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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, August 27, 1921, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1921-08-27/ed-1/seq-6/

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Page Six
SCHOOL DAYS
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I I \ DpKewVS ff, I / /f/i/tl
Ifcr.eysucVle an 3 sn?ee{. (ocos4>__ "! l^C,
corr/frcftr P' '
j THE ROMANCE OF WORDS j
' ■* * i
“SINCERE." ?
* * T FIRST glance the English ;
T A word “sincere” would ;i]v- •
4 pear to have little connection I
l with “wax”- —hut. by reason of ■
f a custom prevalent among .
1 Homan builders, that is pns'isc- t
| ly where it ctime from. i
i In ancient Home workmen fro- T
l quently took short cuts and 4
4 skimped their labors, it being a ;
| common practice for marble f
4 workers to apply a piece of wax ;
l to a chipped part of the stone f
? in order to conceal the defect 1
i made by a too hasty or too care- !
T less stroke. When the sun i
4 melted the wax, the defect in ]
l the statue or column or pedestal 4
4 would be at once apparent. \
| Meanwhile, however, the laborer 4
f had been paid and th purchaser !
I would find himself with a dam- f
j aged article on his hands. I
i In time, the words “sine ?
? cera" (without wax) began lo •
4 appear in building agreements, ?
? thus stipulating that Iho work 4
l would be carried out by skilled ;
4 workmen and completed without ?
I the use of enmoullage. Cradle 1
* ally the term book on a broader t
| meaning and was applied to per- 4
j sons who were believed to lie |
4 free from defects, who were 4
J genuine and who might be |
4 safely trusted. In Kngllsh, 4
| therefore, all that is expressed I
* in the one word “sincere.”
I (Copyright.) !
amaianmniizacß! -lanc^sr^noEssL^—^
”'• ■ 1 I
Install
Cromar Finished I
Oak Floors f
Homes arc brighter, healthier, happier where ($
oak floors have been installed. They add an
air of refinement. They ease mother’s work. %
Cromar is the wonder floor. Ready (3
finished—like furniture —it nails over
old floors in a single day. f :
No weeks of waiting and noisy work. Cromar is
varnished and waxed by a patented process mak- ] ;jb
ing it cost less than good carpets. Telephone! |
Young & Son, Pocomoke, Md. I |
1 PP P^ | iyiii!ii | ffi. l| fTw*?TTTTTTT^TTTT?Tr[i
: | ELMER E. JUCKETT |
? | Ex-Gob Who Sudden- <
I ly Became Very Rich J
• xit* ,
l 11
. . -i w ?i §
i J | (2
! p •> I Ci
j |
4 Elmer Elsworth .Tuckett, an ex-gob, rj
• was up against it and had .Inst landed
4 a 93-ti-day job in a Chicago depart* (jj
| ment store when lie received word that A
4 he was nn heir to $.100,000 loft by his
| uncle, Harry W Wilson of South
I Springs, S. D. $
k
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT ANI) THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
——
For twenty Lours this food is
baked —one reason you like
it —another reason why it
digests so easily.
One of the important things in connection with
any cereal food is to have it thoroughly baked or
cooked. For baking or cooking changes the starch
of the grains.
Grape-Nuts !s the longest baked of oil cereal foods.
It is scientifically baked at carefully regulated tem
peratures for 20 hours. This is one of the reasons
why Grape-Nuts digests so easily; why it agrees
with many people who cannot take any other form
cf cereal without producing fermentation.
A goodly ; sit of Grape-Nuts is converted into
dextrose, ready to be immediately assimilated by
the system, and yield strength and energy. A
further portion has partially undergone this change,
while there remains sufficient unchanged cereal to
F.trcr.gthc"i the digestive organa. It is then in a
condition to meet the various requirements of the
digestive system.
yon •<•>'{ to cat amort strong*hentngftndnour
ishing 'e and one that will dige t more readily, go
to your grocer today and get a package of Grape-
Nuts. Eat it with stewed fruit or as a cereal with
milk or cream; or make it into an appetising pudding,
Every member of the family will ep|oy its deli*
Clous flavor and wholesomeness.
Grape-Nuts—the Body Builder
“There's a Reason”
J
I * AT |
I |
I ______ I
| Beginning Friday, August 26, at 9 O’clock A. M. §
I we will open our doors to one of the Greatest Cut Price Salts ever j§
I held in Pocomoke City and vicinity. The entire stock of Dry Goods, %
I Clothing* and Shoes will be offered to the public at pre-war prices. 1
% Come earlv and avoid the rush. §
s I
§ CLARKE’S O. N. T. COTTON
35 l." 0 Yards to Spool
5c a spool
—.—
*j LADIES’ VOILE WAISTS
- 58 Cents
i ——————-
i>; MEN’S BLUE CHAMBRAY WORK
SHIRTS
| 48 Cents
& BLUE DENIM MEN’S OVERALLS
% 79 Cents
I FALL SPORT OXFORDS
*) in Russian. Calf or Cordovan. Every
v Pair Guaranteed.
\ /
LARGE SIZE TURKISH TOWLS
i 19 Cents
G
*} HILL’S MUSLIN
% 15 Cents
#j BOYS ALL WOOI. SUITS
| $4.98
$ Formerly sold at $lO.OO.
■■. ■ .j|il .111 .1—■ llH'il.l I IMI I B !■■■■■ Ull'l-U’.
£ BOYS’ SHIRTS AND BLOUSES
48 Cents
Ij
Fisher’s Bargain Store 1
| We Undersell Everybody I
| 307-309 Clarke Ave. Pocomoke City, Md. I
BLEACHED MUSLIN
Good Quality.
10 Cents
UNBLEACHED MUSLIN
8 Cents
All tennis slippers and shoes re
duced below cost.
MUSLIN UNDERSKIRTS AND
GOWNS
79 Cents
MEN’S BALBRIGGAN
UNDERWEAR
39 Cents
GEORGETTE BLOUSES
(Newest Styles)
$2.95
All newest style plaid and pleated
silk skirts at half price.
MEN’S SUSPENDERS and BELTS
29 Cents
TABLE OILCLOTH
35 Cents
A Special Opening Program
The Four
Artists
“The Advantage
of A Handicap”
By Elliott A. Boyl
OPENING THE
Tenth Anniversary Program
i
OF
CHAUTAUQUA
Season Tickets i : $2,50
Pocomoke-Septetnber, 6 to 12
Saturday, August 27, 1921.
MEN’S KHAKI PANTS &
$1.25 I
APKON GINGHAM Ig
9*3 Cents j|
LADIES SILK HOSE (all colors) i\
39 Cents l &
DRESS GINGHAM ®
14 Cents jp
MEN’S AND LADIES LISLE HOSE
8 Cents
Our new Fall Millinery is in now.
Come in and be convinced that we
have the latest styles at lowest
prices.
MEN’S HATS AND CAPS AT ||
Half-Price 1
LADIES VESTS AT
13 Cents
MEN’S DRESsThIRTS #
89 Cents
LADIES CORSETS &
89 Cents

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