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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, August 01, 1941, Image 9

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1941-08-01/ed-1/seq-9/

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Friday, August 1, 1941
SIDNEY SNOW will be glad to
answer any questions
on food
Tricks Of The Trade
For Simple Lemonades
We all know that there are many
tricks to all trades and possibly more
to cooking than any. One can take
the simplest thing to prepare and
14am all sorts of interest things about
it—short cuts or tasty long cuts—but
all interesting and with definite re
sults.
Just to demonstrate this, let’s take
sbmething as simple and well-known
as a lemonade and just see what can
be done to and with it. Well, in
the first place, that accumulation of
sugar we usually find at the bottom
of the glass can be done away with
by making a sugar syrup. This syrup
can be made in fairly large quanti
ties and kept on hand to be used as
needed—being made thusly:
SUGAR SYRUP
4 cups sugar
4 cups water
Boil the sugar and water together
for ten minutes. Pour into clean hot
jars and seal.
That's all there is to it!
Then we come to the actual mak
ing of the lemonade —that too is sim
ple and probably known by one and
all, young or old, but for good luck—
LEMONADE
6 lemons
3 cups water
1 to 1 1-2 cups sugar syrup
HOUSEHOLD HINTS
V ————-
By EUNICE ELLIS
Home Economist
Eastern Shore Public Service
FRUIT PUNCH
3 qts. fresh or canned pineapple
juice
Juice of 8 lemons
Juice of 8 oranges
Juice of 3 limes
2 cups sugar
2 bunches mint
4 quarts ginger ale
2 quarts plain soda water
1 pint fresh strawberries, quarter
ed
Mix fruit juices, sugar, and mint
and chill 2 hours. If fresh pineapple
juice is used, increase the amount of
sugar. Just before pouring juices
over a large cake of ice in a punch
bowl, add the ginger ale, soda water,
and strawberries. (Serves 35).
. . CHOCOLATE MINT DRINK
2 squares chocolate
1 cup boiling water
3-4 cup sugar
4 tablespoons marshmallow topping
2 drops oil of peppermint
1 quart milk
Melt chocolate over hot water, add
boiling water, and cook 3 minutes.
Add sugar and cook 2 minutes; re
move from heat, add the marshmallow
topping, and beat until smooth. Add
oil of pepermint and the milk; com
bine thoroughly and pour into iced
glasses. (Serves 6).
RADIANT LIVING
Begin Anew Today
By Rev. C. M. Griffeth
Cecilton, Md.
There is always something so in
spiring in a sunrise. You can not
•watch that great orb of rosy light un
conquerably rise above the horizon,
driving before it the last remnants of
lingering twilight of the preceding
night without feeling within your own
heart the resurgance of hope, confi
dence and determination to win.
Perhaps yesterday was not all it
should have been for you. Perhaps
it was a day full of disappointment,
discouragement, and distress.
If yesterday has been unkind to
you, why drag its unhappiness into
today’s life, by constantly thinking
about its miserable failures?
yesterday with all its failures is
dpw gone. Let ,jt stay gone!
Today is another dayj,
noyr, this very moment—a fresh start
right from scratch! Sure you can!
you are even now leaps ahead, if you
only knew it. Just pause a moment
and count your many blessings that
iire surrounding you. Just think of
dhe many things that are in your fa
vor! You already have much with
which to make this day one of the
very best days in your life. All you
need is a determination to make it
such!
Happiness lies in the determination
of one’s spirit, not in surrounding
circumstances.
Are you saying it is too late in the
day to make a new start? What if
it may be afternoon now. Tomor
row will soon be here, bringing a
brand new day. Get ready for it by
using the rest of today in making
plains to so profit by the unhappy ex
periences of the past that tomorrow
Copyright Bv Sidney Snow 1936
Squeeze the juice from the fruit.
Mix well with the syrup and water
and serve very cold.
That’s all there is to that too! But
—from here we can go on and on and
on some more—serving all sorts of
lemonades.
APPLE LEMONADE
Wash apples and dice, using every
thing, including the skin and core.
Cook with enough water to cover,
strain through a cloth and add one
cug sugar for each cup of juice thus
obtained. Dissolve sugar in the juice
and cool. Fill glasses half full of
this apple syrup, ad dto each glass
the juice of half a lemon and fill up
with ice and water.
BERRY LEMONADE
To each glass of lemonade add two
tablespoons of crushed fresh or can
ned berries—strawberries, raspberries
or blackberries, loganberries or blue
berries. Seedy fuits should be strain
ed. Garnish with whole berries and
serve with plenty of crushed ice.
LEMON FROST
Fill a tall glass one-fourth full of
cracked ice, add lemonade, filling the
glass three-fourths full and frost the
top with a spoonful of stiffly beaten
egg white sweetened slightly and fla
vored with lemon juice.
SATIN SHINES
Smart navy evening jacket.
By Vera Winston
THE girl who makes the
Jacket an integral part of her
evening frock scheme can af
ford to laugh at sudden chill
breezes. This delightful jacket
top is of navy satin printed
with a white star design. The
dinner dress is of white satin
made with a plain bodice with
narrow shoulder straps. The
skirt has a flared inset at cen
ter front draped to fall like a
wide unpressed pleat, and the
back is plain. It shows the in
creasing importance of satjn
for late summer and early au
tumn wear.
BRIDGEVILLE MURDERER
HELD WITHOUT BAIL
Charles McKinley Tingle, 16 year
old Negro farm hand, charged with
stabbing to death John E. Richards,
30, a Bridgeville business man, was
held without bail for the Court of
Oyer and Terminer at a preliminary
hearing before Magistrate Elwood
Wright in Georgetown, Monday.
tingle, charged utftli ( jftret degree
murder, waived hearing and admitted
he was the knife wielder who stabbed
Richards late Saturday night, July 19
in Bridgeville.
Immediately after the hearing Tin
gle was returned to the Sussex Coun
ty Jail where he was lodged early on
Sunday morning when threats of mob
violence were heard in Bridgeville.
Private Joseph J. Shannon and Pri
vate John Blizzard of the State Po
lice, had Tingle under guard for his
short trip away from the jail. The
arraignment drew only a few specta
tors.
you might guide your feet into the
paths of more joyous walking.
Radiant becomes the man who has
learned to follow the example of the
Apostle Paul who was determined to
forget the unhappiness of the past
and to keep looking toward the fu
ture with joyous anticipations.
THREE MEALS A DAY
BIG DISPLAY OF
FIREWORKS IN
SALISBURY, 41H
Monday, August 4th, has been se
lected as the date for Salisbury’s dis
play of fireworks which annually at
tracts 20,000 people.
The display will be used this year
as a tribute of Welcome to several
hundred Elks who will hold their 21st
Annual Convention in Salisbury.
In addition to the Fireworks dis
play, there will be a parade and ex
hibition drill by the crack Drum and
! Bugle Corps of the Veterans of For
eign Wars and a concert by the Wi
comico High School Band.
The 115th Infantry Regimental
Band and Choral Club will also par
ticipate in the program.
Col. D. John Markey, Commanding
the 115th Infantry which includes the
National Guard units from the East
ern Shore who have been called into
Federal service, has accepted the
city’s invitation to bring his two musi
cal organizations to Salisbury for the
evening.
Almost 1,000 Elks, their wives and
families are expected to attend the
Convention which will cover a four
day period, August 3rd to 6th.
Monday night’s program will be run
on this time schedule:—
7:00 P. M. Parade and Drill by
VFW Drum and Bugle Corps.
7:30 Concert by Wicomico High
School Band.
8:15 Concert by 115th Infantry
Band and Choral Club.
9:00 P. M. Mammoth Fireworks
Display.
Poetry Corner
ONE DAY AT A TIME
Some people have nothing but sun
shine,
With scarcely a cloud in their skies;
No worry or trouble besets them,
And seldom do tears dim their eyes;
They always seem carefree and happy
In a world that, to them, is sublime; —
And yet, a whole life time of pleasure
Is enjoyed just one day at a time.
There are those who know hardship
and sorrow, —
Some people have more than their
share;
Frail bodies are weakened by sick
ness,
And hearts overburdened with care.
Though much that we dread never
happens,
And we fret without reason or rhyme;
Yet the load, be it ever so grievous,
Is carried one day at a time.
To most of us life is a mixture
Of the evil, as well as the best,
And the way the portions are dealt us
Gives living a spice and a zest;
We may walk in pleasant, green val
leys,
Or have wearisome mountains to
climb;
So, no matter what life has to offer
We will live it one day at a time.
Alma Gertrude Hurley
CAMP MEETING TIME
ON SMITH’S ISLAND
Saturday after next, and for a lit
tle more than a week thereafter, it
will again be camp meeting time at
Smith’s Island, the lovely little island
in the Chesapeake Bay and camp meet
ing time is one event that is upper
most in the minds and hearts of the
citizens of the three communities
which go to make up Smith’s Island
—Ewell, Rhodes Point and Tylerton—
as well as the numerous fprmer resi
dents and visitors who attend this an
nual event.
The meetings wiU get under way on
August 2 and will continue through
Sunday, August 10th
The “Happy Clarks”, famed
singers who are heard regularly over
radio station, KYW, Philadelphia, Pa„
will be in charge of the music and
will be assisted by Miss Edna Griffen
berg at the piano. Those who have
heard the “Happy Clarks” over the
radio will not want to miss the op
portunity of seeing, as well as hear
ing them.
Services will be held each evening
at 7:30 o’clock. On Sundays there will
be services morning, afternoon and
evening with the initial service of the
day, the Love Feast, beginning at
9:30 o’clock. Gifted speakers will
bring the messages of the day.
In order that visitors will be able
i to have easy access to and from the
i island, two boats, the “Island Belle”
and the “Fish-Hawk” will make reg
ularly scheduled runs between Cris
field and Smith’s Island.
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT. POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND
11. A. M. Service Every Sunday. Par
ish House, Third Street.
Everybody welcome.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. John A. Ditto, Pastor
SUNDAYS
9:45 A. M. Bible School
11:00 A. M. Morning Worship with
sermon.
6:30 P. M. Young Peoples meet
ings.
7:30 P. M. Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAYS
7:30 P. M. Prayer Service.
WOMEN’S MISSIONARY UNION
7:30 P. M. Women’s Missionary So
iety, Ist Monday of the month.
7:30 P. M. Young Women’s Auxil
iary, Ist Friday of the month.
7:30 P. M. Girls’ Auxiliary, 2nd
Monday of the month.
7:30 P. M. Junior, Third Monday of
the month.
7:30 Senior Aid, 2nd Tuesday.
SALEM METHODIST CHURCH
J. W. Wootten, Pastor
SUNDAYS
10:00 A. M. Sunday School.
11:00 A. M. Sermon.
6:45 P. M. Epworth League.
7:30 P. M. Sermon.
WEDNESDAYS
7:30 P. M. Prayer Meeting.
PITTS CREEK PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
Rev. Robert B. Stewart, Minister
Pocomoke City
Beer isn't brewed from
words
<jyj-yfn claims
Highest* Priced Malt!
Finest Grains! • Costliest Hops!
No beer regardless of its price is brewed
from costlier ingredients than
Gunther’s "S^tieer
- ~~ ftflwftirftrrhs Aston
WITH GREATER VALUES IN
SALISBURY
; . „■ fail To w ui rrfu s:i
• i&T • J ' ■r<rtfi }r ’r*d-
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
AUGUST Bth8 th AND 9™
They’re Here Again - Salisbury’s Semi-Annual Dollar Day Sales. A town wide event
with Forty Stores cooperating and offering exceptional Dollar Day values. Your
Shopping trip to Salisbury on August Bth and 9th will be profitable for you.
Look For The Official “Dollar Day” Stores
SUNDAYS
10:00 A. M. Sunday School.
11:00 A. M. Worship Service.
Beaver Dam
SUNDAYS
2:16 P. M. Sunday School.
3:00 P. M. Service of Worship.
Everybody welcome. Come and
worship with us.
Preaching every other Sunday at
7:30 P. M.
BETnANY METHODIST
CHURCH
G. E. Leister, Pastor
ORDER OF SERVICES
9:45 A. M. Sunday School.
9:45 A. M. Men’s Bible Class.
11:00 A. M. Morning Worship and
Sermon.
6:45 P. M. Junior C. E. Society.
7:30 P. M. Evening Worship and
Sermon.
PRAYER MEETING
Prayer meeting each Wednesday
evening at 7:30 o’clock. You are in
vited.
POCOMOKE CIRCUIT ...
J. B. Chadwick, Pastor
Cokesbury
10 A. M. Church School.
11:00 A. M. Preaching.
Emmanuel
2 P. M. Church School.
TOC T% M* IA
k IN 7DAYS
666
Edited by Wilma E. Deut.e
3 P. M. Preaching.
GLAD TIDINGS TABERNACLE
Corner 7th & Walnut Sts.
Rev. R. Stanley Berg, Pastor
SUNDAYS
9:45 A. M. Sunday School.
11:00 A. M. Morning worship.
7:00 P. M. Christ’s Ambassadors.
7:30 P. M. Evening worship service
TUESDAYS
7:30 P. M. Prayer meeting.
THURSDAYS
7:30 P. M. Bible study.
PORTERSVILLE TABERNACLE
Stockton, Md.
Interesting Bible lecture illustrated
NO EXTRA CHARGE for
100 Hours Use of Electric Fan!
Bring comfort to hot, sultry days with the cooling
breeze of an Electric Fan. Just switch it on and Ist.
it ran without additional cost to you.
If you're an average consumer (using 36 kflowatta
or more per month) you may use at least 6 additional
kilowatt hours on the New Rate and pay no move
than you did prior to July readings. These 6 Extra
Kilowatts will run an Electric Pfcn about 100 bouva.
* ENJOY MORE ELECTRICAL COMPORT
AT NO EXTRA COST!
J.S"i < > . •
EASTERN SNORE PUBLIC SERVICE
(UcMjr KOmratt’s BaUtwM)
Food of course, must be well I
seasoned to be worthy of
its piquancy
with Bible pictures every Sunday
night.
Song service 7:30.
Lecture at 8 o’clock.
Friday night
Prayer meeting 7:46.
Young People’s Meeting 8:30.
FrettyChildren
Havo you noticed your children are in*
tempered and reatleea when traveling!
This la due to motion upaettlng their or*
gann of halanoe—cauidng travel nausea or
dlarinoM. Relieve this with Mother*
mUi'm For the past 35 yearfl
MothmriiWm has been successfully
used os an aid in relieving and pro renting
v travel nausea. Kocommcndea
isPiiiriw.i for adults and children when
T*ui!rirK traveling by sea. train, bus,
motor or air. Write for booklet.
THE MOTHERSIU. REMEDY CO* ltd. 1
<PO Lafavttte St.; New York 14
Page 9

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