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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, August 15, 1941, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1941-08-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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DEMOCRAT b.
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT SST. 1898
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE EBT 1880
“Chirps”^
from the
Democrat’s Pen
Well, Sir, I believe I remarked once
before in this column that it is said,
“The Lord takes care of babies and
drunks.” I’m not exactly a baby, and
I don’t get drunk often enough so’s
one could note it, but, this morning,
I wasn’t feeling as “toppy” as usual
—may be due to the crabs I ate last
night down at Winter Quarters. I
didn’t feel very much like writing,
specially trying to write in a humor
ous vein,
• So, whether lam a baby, or wheth
er I’m a drunk, here comes Providence
along in the shape of John Borum’s
good newspaper he published down in
Accomac, and I’m taken care of,
whether or no. I’m going to let him
pinch hit for me and, I’ll leave it to
the public if he hasn’t made a three
bagger, where the best I could have
done would probably have been a
Texas-Leaguer.
Seems as if the Old Dominion has
adopted daylight saving time. The
people down in Accomac appear to be
all “het up” about it, and this is the
way “The News” tackles the situa
tion:
With Daylight Saving Time (1
hour earlier) being proclaimed by
Governor Price and half the busi
nesses adopting it and the other
half wondering whether they should
or not, the Eastern Shore citizen
will probably soon find himself in
a quandary.
“While part of the folks are go
ing to bed the other half will be get
ting up,” said one observer this
week.
“Now supose you are on E. S.
T. Monday,” he continued, “and
you get off work at 6:00; you eat
and dress between 6:00 and 7:30,
but the movies start at 8:00 D. S.
T. and already you’re half an hour
late.
“Or on the other hand if you quit
at 6:00 D. S. T. and the movies
start at 8.00 E. S. T.; in three hours
you’d probably get disgusted wait
ing and wouldn’t want to go any
way.
“Then just imagine going to
church at 9:00 o’clock, when we
have trouble enough getting there
at 10:00 as it is. But if the preach
er will go on D. S. T. and let us
out at 11:00 E. S. T. that would
make our Sunday afternoons an
hour longer.
“And the softball games starting
an hour earlier would have to play
in the twilight, so they’ll probably
split the difference and mess every
body up.
“And just think if you were on E.
S. T. and decided to call Joe Jenks
who was on D. S. T. and it was 11.00
E. S. T.; Joe would probably reach
for the phone and cuss something
like this, !!*&%!” so and so, what
the Blankety blank do you mean
calling me up at midnight.
“Consider the plight of a poor
citizen who might transact business
at 11.30 p. m. Couldn’t the lawyers
go to town on that; arguing wheth
er or not the business took place
the day it was dated, the day before
it was dated, or the day after it
was dated. They’d probably wind
up proving that there wasn’t any
day anyway.
“And there’s the barnyard Cock!
How are the farmers going to set
him so he’ll be able to tell Junior
when to get up and dash into town
to be there on time to go to work.
And the Farmer himself will have
to milk the cows an hour earlier if
he wants to be down to Accomac
when Court convenes at 9.00 in
stead of 10.00 E. S. T.
“Can’t you imagine receiving a
pretty engraved invitation to a
wedding and right down in the cor
ner “All time referred to during
ceremony will be computed as D. S.
T. following ceremony details will
revert to old time.”
“Or aunt Mamie inviting us out
to Sunday dinner and saying, “Now
children you’d better come at 1.00
D. S. T. as I like to have my meals
sharp at 12.00.”
“And then you might plan a fish
ing trip and just casually state we’ll
meet down at the dock at 10.00 and
then half the party would arrive at
9:00 E. S. T. while the other half
might arrive at 10.00 L>. S. T,
“Those fellows who are sparking
better be on their p’s and q’s to be
(Continued on Page 12)
LOCAL SCOUT
IS AWARDED
HIGHEST HONOR
Ames Byrd Corbin Receives
Honor Recognition At Fa
mous Camp Rodney
FIRST RECIPIENT OF
HONOR IN TROOP HISTORY
For years, in fact ever since Camp
Rodney has been opened, the boys
from Pocomoke City have tried hard
to be nominated for the Honor Recog
nition for General Camp Spirit, All-
Rodney and have failed to secure the
honor/
This is not due to the Scouts, as
the Pocomoke troop has sent Eagles,
Lifes, Stars, First Class, Second Class
and Tenderfoot Scouts. Up to this
year, none of these scouts was ever
nominated.
This year, a young scout, only Sec
ond Class, made his way to camp. He
came home with the highest award
which can be given at any Boy Scout
Camp.
This boy was Ames Byrd Corbin.
The honor recognition that he was a
warded is obtained without any course
to be followed, no quantitative amount
of work to be done. No boy can
know specificially how or just when
he might receive an honor, as the
camp staff itself cannot know except
thru active observation. Boys should
know that only through a fine spirit
of participation, a genuine desire for
improvement in sportsmanship and
increased initiative, can Honor Recog
nition come his way.
Nominations for Honor Recogni
tions are made only by Directors of
Activities and, in some cases, by the
Directors of the individual camp.
Besides the one recognition for
General Camp Spirit, many other hon
ors were given to the Pocomoke boys.
These awards are approved by the
camp staff and given to the boys for
their interest, improvement, spirit and
achievement in each of the more im
portant camp activities, some of which
are: Camp Cleanliness, Swimming,
Camp Improvement, Scouting, Boat
ing, and Camp Craft and Camping.
Appropriate certificates serving as
the symbols of the Honor Recognition
were presented to all the boys at a
ceremonial campfire on the last night
of the period.
SENATOR TYDINGS TO
BROADCAST OVER WBAL
The following telegram was receiv
ed on Thursday from U. S. Senator
Millard E. Tydings:
Having accepted the kind invitation
of the radio station commencing Fri
day night next, at nine P. M., I will
speak weekly over Station WBAL,
Baltimore to the people of Maryland
giving them an intimate account of
the happenings here in the nation’s
capital and comments on world events.
DRESS COMPANY
TO ESTABLISH
A PLANT HERE
WiU Employ Forty To Fifty
People To Manufacture
Garments
According to the best information
obtainable, the second floor of the old
fire engine house, will be utilized in
the near future as a sewing room.
Mr. M. Bogash, president and gen
eral manager of the Princess Anne
Dress Company, will soon begin the
manufacture of garments at the above
location. The partition which cut off
the kitchen, in the times when it was
used as a room for dinners, has been
removed, and work in installing the
machinery is expected to start on
Monday next.
This plant will employ from 10 to
60 people at the start, with prospects
for increase as the business gets go
ing. All such enterprises should have
the encouragement and hacking they
require from local influence to make
them successful. There is no reason
for doubting they will get it.
C c THE
COPY
LOCAL ROTARY CLUB
DINES IN PICNIC STYLE
The local Rotary Club met in reg
ular picnic style on Monday evening,
feasting on crabs, pickles, crackers,
hot dogs, soft drinks and the rest.
The site was under the trees at
Winter Quarter, where is located the
attractive log cabin and the golf
course in the Municipal Park. There
was a good attendance and everybody
had a good time.
The riverside development is one
Pocomoke City should really be proud
of. The cabin is commodious and is
a splendid specimen of the carpenter’s
handiwork. Its place on the river
shore, with trees in its “front yard”
and all other yards, makes a scene
hard to beat, and few towns have such
an opportunity to make for themsel
ves such a convenient and all-suffi
cient community centre. The resi
dents of this city should give it un
stinted support.
WOMEN KILLED
ON HIGHWAY BY
HIT-RUN DRIVER
Both Were Residents Of Ocean
City. Were Walking On
Road When Struck
SELBYVILLE MAN LATER
GIVES HIMSELF UP
Two women, Mrs. Amelia Parsons,
and Mrs. Lilly B. Truitt, the former
65 years of age, the latter 55, both
of Ocean City, Md., were killed on the
Ocean City-Berlin highway by a hit
and-run driver, last week end, Satur
day night. Since then, it is reported
that Roland C. Scott, of Selbyville,
Delaware, has identified himself as
the driver of the car that Struck the
two women. At this writing, no
hearing of Scott had been held.
The week-end was rather prolific
in fatalities, thirteen lives having
been sacrificed; two, by drowning
and the others by motor-vehicle acci
dents. ,
The list of the deaths, throughout
the State is as follows:
George Richard Gohlinghorst, 63, of
English Consul, Md.
Edgar Mohlman, 26, Hyde Park,
Back River, Md.
Leroy Brown, 23, Westminster, Md.
Miss L&Rue Whitehurst, 19, West
minster.
Mrs. Amelia L. Parsons, 65, Ocean
City, Md.
Mrs. Lilly Baden Truitt, 55, Ocean
City.
Rodney Costello, Jr., 17, Gaithers
burg, Md.
William Ellis Leibig, 28, Newmans
town, Pa.
Edward Foss, 59, 3000 block Vine
yard Lane.
John Stakes, 19, Washington.
Mattie Quickly, 47, Negro, 1300
block McElderry street.
Henry Quickly, 5, Negro, his grand
son.
An unidentified man, about 50, kill
ed on the Philadelphia road.
Among these, Costello was a well
known Gaithersburg sandlot baseball
player and high school athlete, drown
ed in the Potomac river near Seneca,
Md., when the canoe in which he and
! Clifford Howard, Jr., were riding up
set in midstream. Howard told police
that Costello became panicky and, al
though assisted to the canoe several
times, slipped from Howard’s grasp
and disappeared.
The accident in which the Quickleys
were injured occurred three miles
north of Centreville, Md.
MR. BELCO BEUTZ
i WEDS IN BALTIMORE
! Announcement has been made of
the marriage of Miss Mary Stewart
• Lewis, daughter of Mrs. George H.
i Lewis, to Mr. Walter Bclco Belitz,
• Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter B.
i Belitz of Baltimore.
The ceremony took place in that
• city Friday, August eighth.
The groom has a number of friends
■ in Pocomoke having visited here on
' one or two occasions. He is the bro
• ther of Miss Blanche Y. Belitz, a mem
• her of the faculty of the Towson Higli
i School and a former teacher in the
Pocomoke High School.
AND
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
POCOMOKE CITY. MD., FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1941
ATTORNEY IS
ENDORSED FOR
STATE OFFICE
! R. W. McCullough Enters Race
For Leadership Dept. Of Md.
American Legion
IS PAST COMMANDER
POST 3, HYATTSVILLE
I .
Robert W. McCullough, Prince
1 Georges County attorney, will enter
i the race for leadership of the Ameri
i can Legion, Department of Maryland, i
. The election will be held Saturday :
, morning, August 16th at the Emerson
■kJ
Hotel, the last day of the Department
1 convention.
Snyder-Farmer Post No. 3, of Hy
attsville, of which McCullough is a
I Past Commander, endorsed him for
the State office, and now he is con
| sidered one of the strongest candi
, dates in the field. McCullough was
' Commander of Snyder-Farmer Post
in 1929, during which year his Post
, enjoyed the largest membership in its
' history.
• He has served as Judge Advocate
. of the State Legion group, has served
on the executive committee, and has
- served as President of the Exchange
Club, the Optimist Club and other dv
? ic organizations.
He was born in Cecil County, Mary
, land, near Elkton in 1898; moved to
Havre de Grace from Northeast, about
. 1904; graduated from the Havre de
■ Grace high school in 1916; graduated
(Continued on Page 6)
‘ WEEK STANDING
OF SOFT BALL
LEAGUE HERE
Ramblers Are Tied With The
) Essos By Virtue Of Two
Recent Victories
This week standing of the City
Soft Ball League finds the Ramblers
. tied with the Essos, by virtue of two
I victories since the last issue, while
. the Essos were suffering their first
t defeat of the season in the league.
1 Thursday night of last week the
- Ramblers defeated the Chain Clerks
s in a thrilling game by the score of
- 10-5.
1 On Monday night of this week the
* Pepsi Colas took the Chain Clerks in
to camp for their second straight de
-3 feat by a score of 7-5.
5 Tuesday night saw the first defeat
of the Essos as stated above by the
Chiefs, score 14-2. This was one of
the greatest upsets of the last half
of the season to date and the Essos
have had smooth sailing since the
J start of the season but the Chiefs
(Continued on Page 4)
t
; A CORRECTION
t In naming the speaker at the
Rotary meeting, held in Chinco
-8 tongue, Va., on Monday, August
,i 4, the “Democrat” published it
us “Drummond Ayres”, when it
r should have been “Ames Drum-
I) mond.” The “Democrat” regrets
e the error.
MISS M. CULLEN 1
TO WED DR. NED
CAREY FAHSI
]
Ceremony At Bride’s Home This j
Afternoon At Four O’clock.
Rev. Stewart Officiating ]
WILL MAKE THEIR HOME
IN ANNAPOLIS, MD. J
i
The marriage of Miss Margaret ;
Elizabeth Cullen, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Winter Calvert Cullen, of Poco
moke City, to Ned Carey Fahs, son of
Mrs. Frank O. Fahs and the late Mr.
Fahs, of Fullerton, California, will j
take place at four o’clock, this after- ,
noon at the home of the bride’s par- ;
ents. The Rev. Robert Barr Stew- ;
art, minister of the Presbyterian
Church will perform the ceremony.
The bride, who will be given in
marriage by her brother, Winter Cal- ■
vert Cullen, Jr., will wear a gown of
white embosssed mousseline de soie.
Her veil of tulle falls from a coronet
of orange blossoms and her bouquet
is gardenias.
Miss Mary Elizabeth Cullen, niece
of the bride will be flowers girl and
Master Winter Calvert Cullen 111,
nephew of the bride, ring bearer. En
sign Howard R. Brandon, U. S. N. R.,
will act as best man.
After a wedding trip, the couple
will reside at 20 Dean Street, Annap
olis.
The bride is a graduate of the Col
lege of William and Mary in Williams
burg, Va., and is a member of the An
napolis High School faculity. The
groom holds the doctorate in romance
language from the University of Cali
fornia and is an instructor at the U.
S. Naval Academy.
Members of the immediate family
and a few intimate friends of the
bride and groom will be present at
the wedding. Out of town guests will
include: Mrs. Frank O. Fahs, Ensign
and Mrs. Howard R. Brandon, Mrs.
Edward F. Lathrop, Jr., Mrs. Charles
L. Johnson and Mr. Charles W. Mix
er, of Annapolis, Md.; Mrs. Paul P.
Blackburn and Mrs. William Wagner,
of *New York; Mrs. Charles K. Zug,
Mr. Thomas Veasey Zug, and Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Veasey Zug, of Phila
delphia; Mr. and Mrs. Veasey B. Cul
len, of Buffalo; Mr. and Mrs. John L.
Fahs and Miss Eleanor Cullen, of Wil
mington; Mr. and Mrs. Harry E.
P&rkhurst and Mr. George Parkhurst
of Baltimore.
4-H MEMBERS TO
VISIT POINTS OF
CAMP INTEREST
Camp To Be Held During Week
Of August Eighteenth At
Pleasant Valley, Md.
Visits to soil conservation demon
strations, a fish hatchery, the Wash
ington. monument on South Mountain,
Fort Frederick fire observation tower,
on Town Hill, and a coal mine in Alle
gany county, are among the things
that will be enjoyed by 4-H club mem
bers who are selected as delegates to
the Maryland 4-H Club conservation
Camp.
This camp will be held during the
week of August 18 at the Pleasant
Valley site in Garrett county, and will
be under the direction of Mylo S.
Downey, assistant boys’ club agent.
Counties will be alocated a number
of delegates, dependent upon the vol
ume of 4-H club conservation work
conducted. The group will assemble
in Frederick on August 18 and contin
ue to the camp the next day, visiting
points of interest along the way. j
Special bus transportation has been
arranged for carrying delegates from
all counties to the camp.
The program for the week will in
clude discussions, demonstrations and
(Continued on Page 4)
Mrs. Preston Marshall is a patient
in the Peninsula General Hospital in
Salisbury where she underwent an op
eration for appendicitis Thursday of
last week. She is getting along nice
ly and hopes to return to her home
here soon.
NEWS AND PICTURE SERVICR
$1.50 ™ A - h
NEW BUSINESS VENTURE
FOR POCOMOKE CITY
Altho’ no representative of the
“Democrat” has been able to contact
those who may put across the new
business venture, still from very re
liable sources it is learned that Poco
moke City is to have a new packing
house.
It is rather well established that
Mr. J. H. Dulany, of Florida, and
Delaware, has purchased of Mr. Ed
ward Landing a plot of ground, con
sisting of 10 to 12 acres, located near
the old Fair grounds. On this he will
erect a large two-story building about
300 feet long and 100 feet wide.
The intention is to do all-around
fruit and vegetable packing work and,
it is said, from 150 to 200 people will I
find employment. This is welcome
news to this community, and there is
oceans of room for any industry that
might come into this territory. It is
hoped more may soon follow.
MISS C.HOUSTON
SUBMITS REPORT
CO. WELFARE
During 1940 And 1941, The
Board Distributed Supplies
Valued At $7,412.56
SEWING ROOMS GAVE EM
PLOYMENT AND CLOTHES
The following report was prepared
and submitted by Miss Cecilia P.
Houston, Executive Secretary:
During twelve months in 1940 and
’4l the Worcester County Welfare
Board distributed clothing and bed
ding valued at $7,412.56 to needy
families in the county. This was in
addition to cash grants for clothing.
These articles were made in the
WPA Training Centers or Sewing
Rooms in Worcester County, the pro
ject having been sponsored locally by
the Board of County Commissioners,
Charles L. Mason, President.
August and September are impor
tant months in clothing distribution,
as at that time the County Welfare
Board endeavors to outfit needy chil
dren for school. This is shown in
last September’s distribution which
amounted to a value of $1,732.40,
while May, 1941, required garments
to the value of only $87.85.
The Sewing Rooms in Worcester
County were closed on June 30, 1941,
and the remaining materials will be
made up in the Wicomico County
WPA Sewing Room. The finished
garments will be brought to Snow
Hill to be received and distributed by
the Worcester County Welfare Board.
The Sewing Room project not only
supplied needed clothing to the coun
ty; it gave employment to a number
of women who otherwise would have
had no source of revenue to meet their
needs. It is understood that there is
little or no prospect of re-opening
the project unless it can be done with
one central Training Center as in
other counties, or with an increased
quota of workers by the Works Pro
ject Administration.
Since there are no defense indus
tries in Worcester County in which
the suspended Sewing Room workers
may secure employment, it is to be
hoped that the quota for women work
ers may be increased soon for Worces
ter County.
QUINTON HOMEMAKERS
CLUB HOLDS PICNIC
The Quinton Homemakers Club held
its annual picnic at Public Landing
i August 6th.
Quite a number were present, be
; tween 45 or 50, including members
and guests.
The ladies displayed their good
cooking by the following menu: Fried
i chicken, crab cakes, home-made rolls,
deviled eggs, potato salad, baked
beans, sandwiches and delicious home
made cakes.
Mrs. Thomas Long, the president,
announced that the September meet
ing would be with Mi's. Marion Dun
can, with Mrs. Clarence Duncan, joint
| hostess.
VOLUME 61 NO. 32
BRITISH WAR
RELIEF BALL
AUGUST 29
Miss Lena H. Riggin Is General
Chairman For Worcester
County
MRS. UPSHUR STEVENSON
HEADS POCOMOKE COM.
A nationally known 14-piece or
chestra with a baritone singer, and a
nationally known radio announcer will
provide music and entertainment at
'.the British War Relief Ball in Ocean
City on August 29th.
Sponsored by the British War Re
lief Society of Maryland, the Ball
is being directed by a countywide
committee of 146 citizens, general
chairman of which is Miss Lena H.
Riggin of Snow Hill. Countywide
chairman appointed with Miss Riggin
are as follows: Publicity chairman,
Mr. C. L. Vincent; Program chairman,
Mrs. William J. Pilchard; Ticket
chairman, Mrs. Joseph E. Brimer, and
chairman of Patrons and Patronesses,
Mrs. Kathryn Corddry.
Every dollar derived from the sale
of admission tickets to the Ball will
be donated for British War Relief
purposes. Expenses incurred in hold
ing the Ball will be borne through
the publication of a beautifully illu
strated advertising and dance souve
nir program.
The committee appointed from Po
comoke City is as follows:
Mrs. Upshur Stevenson, Chairman;,
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. L. Mason, Mr. and
Mrs. C. E. Robertson, Miss Alice
Young, Mrs. Earle Merrill, Mrs. Phil
i ip Creath, Mrs. William Holt, Mrs.
( Raymond Dixon, Mrs. William Bunt
ing, Mrs. Cassell Hall, Mrs. Roger W.
Lankford, Mrs. Bates Hancock, Mrs.
Verlin Krabil, Mrs. Grady Powell,
(Continued on Page 6)
FLORICK-JUSTIS NUPTL4LS
TOOK PLACE AUGUST Z:
_______
Mr. and Mrs. I. N. Justis of this
city, have announced the marriage of
> their daughter, Miss Mary Grace Jus
! tis, to Mr. John Florick, son of Mrs.
■ John Florick and the late Mr. Florick,
i of Hockessin, Del., which took place -
i Saturday, August 2, at the bride'**.
, home. The Rev. G. E. Leister, pastor •
i of Bethany Methodist church, this .;
city, officiated. y
Miss Gladys Farrel, of Wilmington,-
, Del., and Mr. Alfred Florick, of Hoc
s kessin, attended the couple.
After a wedding trip through the
[ north, Mr. and Mrs. Florick will live
r near Hockesessin, Del.
FIRE DESTROYS
HOME NEAR TOWN
TUESDAY NIGHT
| Occupants Away From Home
Only A Short Time Lose
Clothing And Furniture
A large tenant house, owned by
Miss Calvine Howerton and a part of
Cellar House Farm, was completely
destroyed by fire Tuesday night about
9 o’clock. The blaze was first dis
covered by the occupants of Cellar
House who immediately investigated
and sent in the alarm.
The Pocomoke* Fire Company re
sponded promptly but the flapies had
gained too much headway to save the
building and this, together with the
contents, was completely destroyed.
They, however, succeeded in saving
all the outbuildings and stock. The
household furniture and clothing were
a complete loss.
The origin of the fire is unknown.
Mr. and Mrs. Otho Sturgis and fam
ily, who occupied the house, were a
way from home when the fire origina
ted, two of the occupants having left
onlyy about half an hour before the
fire was discovered. Had it occur
red at a later hour, after the. family
had retired, it might have resulted in
loss of life as the entire building was
in ruins in about a half hour after
the alarm was sent in.
The building was partly covered by
insurance.

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