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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, August 22, 1941, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1941-08-22/ed-1/seq-1/

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I* WORCESTER DEMOCRAT
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOCRA T EST. 1898
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE EBT 1880
“Chirps”#-^
from the
Democrat’s Pen
Well, Sir, Old Jo Serra—another of
my friends in need; I’d like John Bor
um to meet him-every once in a while
gets home a real solar plexus, and
then I am helped out when Chirps ma
terial is “sorta skase”. Jo gets off
the following as his latest brain
storm:
Before the old Roman Empire
blew up back yonder around 2000
years ago, things were something
like they are now, here. Taxes
were sky-high divorce was easy
as shootin’ fish—pleasure came
first—spending for swords and
chariots soared—religion was half
hearted.
I been gassin’ about it with
Henry—he is my neighbor. He says
“Jo, instead of standing around
with your mouth open taking in
all the new theories coming over
the radio or reading 2-columns of
hysterical reporters, you better
sharpen a coupla pencils and start
writing your U. S. A. senators and
U. S. A. congressmen. Tell ’em
where to start pruning expenses.
Tell ’em to sweep out the Govt, psy
chologists and economic experi
menters. Tell ’em to send home
their son-in-law and all their other
relatives. Anyway, send home all
who are getting 2 thousand or up
wards, per year. That would just a
bout empty half the buildings. Tell
’em to sell the surplus furniture,
including the 600 thousand swivel
chairs. That might help start the
ball rolling,” he says.
Henry is not so handsome, but
brother, he ijfure is no green pea.
Now, Jo has, in away, stolen my
thunder—not exactly from this col
umn, but it has been running in my
mind, for a long time, to write an
editorial comparing the situation in
theße good old States, to the time
when, the Roman iSenate sat with all
their ancient dignity as the “Barbari
ans’ swarmed into the Eternal City,
sacking and burning as they went.
But, I reckon I haven’t a very re
tentive mind; for what I said had been
running therein, must have kept on
running before I had a chance to get
a firm hold on it, so it has never got
ten a firm abiding-place in my old
think tank.
Now, when Jo begins to talk about
the circumstances that brought about
the fall of the once Mistress of the
civilized world, there are some names
that should stand out very forcibly.
The Huns, Goths, Visigoths, Vandals,
and, prior to these, the Saxons—a
tribe which defied the conquering
power of Rome; and with these, such
names as Alaric, Attila, Odoacer,
with all their host of inferior hench
men, —these should appear vividly be
fore his mind.
It is true the Romans called all who
were not of the Empire—barbarians.
But the invaders of Rome were more
than barbarians in name; they re
vealed all the instincts of untamed
human organisms. They burned, pil
loyed, ravaged estates as well as the
Italian women; killed, tortured, en
slaved, and multilated the men-folk;
they revelled in the riches piled up
by the Roman aristocracy, and had no
pity on the treasures of art and sci
ence, accumulated by a taxation which
destroyed all the liberty of the middle
(Continued on Page 8)
POCOMOKE WINS IN A
SUIT FOR RE-ASSESSMENT
According to information received
by Godfrey Child, Esq., attorney to
the local City Council, the State Tax
Commission has allowed an addition
of nearly $11),000 to the assessment
laid on the property of the Maryland
Light and Power Company in Poco
nioke City.
This action is the result of an ap
peal to the Commission by the city
officials, who asked that the assess
ment on the company’s property be
placed at $98,500, an amount formerly
set by a Pocomoke assessor; instead,
the raise brought the figures up to
$76,837.
At a public hearing before the Tax
Commission on May 28, city officials
said they had appealed to the County
Commissioners on several occasions to
revise their assessment against the
power firm, but that no action had
been taken by the county.
City officials testified at the hearing
there had been no appreciable de
crease in the value of the company’s
property in Pocomoke City to justify
the reduction in assessment.
Sc THK
'J'-’ COPY
MUNICIPAL PARK TO OPEN
WEDNESDAY NEXT, WITH
EXHIBITION GAME OF GOLF
Professionals Will Show The Public How To
Play The Old Scottish Game. Small Charge
To Those Who Are Mere Spectators
COURSE IS WIDELY PRAISED
FOR ITS POTENTIAL BEAUTY
The Winter Quarters Country Club will be opened for the
playing of golf next Wednesday, August 27, 2:00 P. M., when an
exhibition match will be played.
The Winter Quarters Country Club,
will be opened for the playing of golf
next Wednesday, August 27, 2:00 P.
M., when an exhibition match will be
played.
The exhibition match will be a
foursome—Ed Kierney, former “pro”
of the James River Country Club,
Newport News, Virginia., Jimmy Ar
macost, former “pro” of the Wood
holme Country Club, Baltimore, Mary
land, Harrison Dye, Temperanceville,
Virginia, former title holder, Acco
mack Country Club, Accomac, Vir
ginia, and Pete Walters, our local
amateur of the Winter Quarters
Country Club.
There will be an admission charge
of 26c for spectators who would like
to follow the match around the course.
Those wishing to play golf on the
Winter Quarters course on the 27th,
will be charged 60c green fee, plus
caddy fee.
The club house will be open that
day and sandwiches aqd toft drinks
may be purchased.
The fairways, tees, and greens,
while not in perfect condition, are
playable at the present time, and are
expected to be in good shape for the
opening game next Wednesday.
According to opinions expressed by
those thoroughly familiar with the
game and who have seen and played
many courses throughout the eastern
section of the United States, the Win
ter Quarters Golf Course will become
one of the most beautiful and inter
esting courses in this section of the
(Continued on Page 8)
CLUB HOUSE AT THE WINTER QUARTERS GOLF COURSE
POCOMOKE CITY, MD., FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1941
0
; ROUND C. SCOTT
PLEADS GUILTY
AT TRIAL THURS.
Prison Sentence Suspended Up
on Payment Of S4OO Fine 1
And Costs
1 ‘
’ The trial of Roland C. Scott, 18,
of Selbyville, Del., took place yester- |
day (Thursday) morning in Ocean
City, Md., at 11 o’clock, before Magis
• trate J. Edward White.
! Young Scott was charged with vio
’ lation of the Maryland motor vehicle
1 laws arising from the death of two !
Ocean City women on August 9.
Judge White said Scott was charged 1
1 only “with failing to stop after an
accident in which a person has been 1
1 fatally injured.”
! Young Scott, son of Roland F. I'
! Scott, merchant of Selbyville, Del.,!
! has been at liberty under bond of
SSOO since August 10, when he gave 1
' himself up to State Police Corporal 1
! Newton J. W. Lloyd and confessed,
' the officer said, to having been the 1
1 unknown driver of an automobile
which struck and fatally injured two :
? pedestrians on the Ocean City-Berlin 1
‘ highway the night before.
! Scott confessed he drove away
(Continued on Page 6)
AND
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
N.
MRS. MILES T. TULL
Mrs. Tull will be remembered by her majiy friends as Miss
Kathryn Barnes, formerly of this city.
PREPARATIONS NOW IN
PROGRESS FOR THE BALL
Four nationally known radio and
stage artists, augmented by the well
known “N” Orchestra directed by i
George Weber, of Baltimore, will pro
vide high class entertainment and
music during the Worcester County
British War Relief Benefit Ball, to
be held in the Ocean City Pier ball
room on Friday evening, August 29.
Tickets to the Ball are today being
disposed of throughout this county
and the lower Eastern Shore, in addi
tion to those being sold in Baltimore
City.
National, State and County digni
taries together with the Maryland
Committee of the British War Relief
Society, Inc., will attend the Worces
ter County Ball at Ocean City on Au
gust 29th.
WHEAT CROP INSURANCE
! FOR WORCESTER COUNTY
i
The U. S. Department of Agricul
ture, Agricultural Adjustment Admin
istration, upon the approval Of the
Federal Crop Insurance Corporation,
has made available Wheat Crop In
surance to the Worcester County
farmers whereby they are insured a
gainst drought, insects, hail, fire,
' flood, wind and other natural enemies
of wheat.
Wheat crop insurance assures the
farmer of a gross income covering
75':; of the normal yield of wheat
planted, at a premium of one-half bu
shel of wheat per acre planted. The
premium is deductable from the
A.A.A. conservation payments.
August 30th is the last date that
l insurance can be written. Farmers
interested should contact the County
I Agent’s office on or before this date.
$1.50 v’k"
MILES T. TULL, SECRETARY
OF STATE, LOSES LIFE BY
DROWNING, SUNDAY LAST
*
Was On A Pleasure Trip When He Was Dragged
From The Boat While Attempting To Draw
Bucket Of Watey. Body Found Tues.
WAS ONLY TWENTY-SIX YEARS
OF AGE WHEN APPOINTED
People, not only of this community, but of the whole State
learned with deep regret that Hon. Miles Tawes Tull, the 26-year
old Maryland Secretary of State, had lost his life by drowning
in the lower waters of the Pocomoke River.
SENATOR TYDINGS
TO TALK WEEKLY
OVER THE RADIO
Time Of Broadcasting Will Be
At 9 O’Clock On Friday Even
ing To Maryland People
Senator Tydings will talk weekly at
9 o’clock on Friday evenings to the
people of Maryland on happenings in
the world and particularly those in
Washington.
These talks will be on radio station
WBAL, Baltimore. Senator Tydings
says:
“With war in both Europe and Af
rica on the one hand and Asia on the
other and with the United States aid
ing the nations opposing the Axis
powers with all help short of war, I
feel that each week. I can bring to
the people of Maryland much infor
mation to supplement the general
press reports and which will give
them a more intimate view of what
is taking place. I received many let
ters concerning my first talk last
week from radio listeners in Mary
land. Generally they have urged me
to continue these talks so that they
(Continued on Page 6)
NEWS AND PICTURE SERVICM
VOLUME 61 NO. 33
O People, not only of this community,
| but of the whole State learned with
deep regret that Hon. Miles Tawes
Tull, the 26-year-old Maryland Sec
retary of State, had lost his life by
drowning in the lower waters of the
| Pocomoke River.
I Residents of Pocomoke were special
ly regretful since, only recently had
Mr. Tull taken for a wife, Miss Kath
( ryn Barnes, a native of Pocomoke,
but lately removed with her parents
to Crisfield. She has the sympathy
of many friends here in her bereave
ment,
t Mr. Tull, according to accounts of
( the tragedy, was cruising in the Po
i comoke River on a pleasurable fish
t ing trip. With him were Mrs. Tull;
Mr. Tull’s brother, H. Parker Tull,
t Jr., and his wife; Mr. Paul Maddrix
, and his wife; Mr. Henry Ennis and
his wife; Mr. and Mrs. Garland Ennis;
Mr. and Mrs. William Tilghman, and
three other couples, all of Somerset
' County. The boat was owned by Mr.
Paul Maddrix, of Marion Station.
* As related by those in the boat,
1 the unfortunate man was dragged
5 from the boat as he attempted to filil.
* a bucket with water. Not much con-r
--1 cern was felt, since he was a strong
* swimmer. Mr. Ennis promptly dived
c to his assistance, but, it* is said, Mr.
" Tull gave him the assurance he was
1 all right and would continue to swim,
until the boat turned for the rescue.
a
However, he was soon seen to be
r in trouble, Mr. Ennis doubled his ef
forts to save his friend. He was un
; successful and was nearly drowned.:
in his attempt, being brought aboard
the boat in an unconscious condition..
Mrs. Parker Tull, Jr., who was said.,
to be a strong swimmer, also addetf
her efforts to no avail.
Efforts were immediately started
to recover the body, but not until
Tuesday morning was it recovered.
Governor O’Conor got into action at
once. The Slate’s Conservation De
partment fleet dropped dynamite
bombs, and dragging operations pre
ceded this. There was no let-up in
the search for the victim. Charles
Elliott, of Marion Station, finally
(Continued on Page 5)
FIRE COMPANY TO
STAGE CARNIVAL
FOR FULL WEEK
\
The Heller Acme Shows Will Ar
rive On Sunday And Will Ap
pear On School Campus
.
The Pocomoke City Fire Co., will
bring to this city next week The
Heller Acme Shows for a week’s en
gagement for a Fair and Carnival.
The Heller Acme Shows completely
motorized will arrive Sunday, August
24th in Pocomoke City and can be
seen setting up at the Elementary
School grounds, Walnut and Fourth
Streets, where the Firemen will hold
the Fair.
It is said that Heller’s Acme Shows
carry many riding devices and shows
of the latest designs. One of the
many shows is that of Hawaiian
Follies, managed and operated by Mr.
Wagner; another that of many laughs
for the children is a monkey show,
where many animals have been well
trained.
There will be fun at the fair for
the Old as well as the Young, so
come one and all, to the Pocomoke
City Fire Co., Fair and Carnival, Po
comoke City, Md., August 25th to
30 th.

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