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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, November 14, 1941, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1941-11-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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WORCESTER DEMOCRAT-^
*T" r . I | n ° Cl l rd ra ßoom b
AND "
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT EST. 1898
THE LEDGER*ENTERPRISE EST 1880
B. F. STURGIS
DIED TUESDAY
IN BALTIMORE
Prominent Business Man In
Pocomoke City For The
Last Twenty-Two Years
FUNERAL SERVICES TODAY
FROM WATSON’S PARLORS
Barney F. Sturgis, well-known
business man of this city, died on
Wednesday last in Johns Hopkins
hospital, his death occuring after an
illness of more or less severity ex
tending over four years.
The deceased was the son of the
late Morris and Jane Sturgis, and
was born April 4, 1883. Prior to his
taking up his residence in Pocomoke
22 years ago, he was connected with
the Wilson Company, of Philadelphia.
Twenty-two years ago he came to Po
comoke and engaged in the poultry,
egg, and feed business. Failing health
forced him to retire from this, but
a temporary improvement induced
him to associate himself with Messrs.
Small and Bull who had purchased
the business that he had built up.
His strength, however, did not stand
him in good stead. He died of a heart
failure superinduced by a diabetic
condition.
Mr. Sturgis was prominent in Re
publican politics, and at the time of
(Continued on Page 12)
HRS. ARTHUR MILLS
DIES AT GREENBACKYILLE
Mrs. Arthur R. Mills, highly es
teemed resident of Greenbackville,
Va., and well known throughout this
locality, died Monday after an illness
of some length.
Though she had not been in good
health yet her death came as a shock
to family and friends.
Funeral services were held from
her late home in Greenbackville
Thursday afternoon at 2.30 o’clock
and were largely attended.
FIRE WRECKS THE
RESIDENCE OF MR.
ERNEST DICKINSON
Breaks Out After A Previous
Blaze In The Chimney Had
Been Extinguished
Fire thought to have originated
in the chimney, wrecked the home of
Mr. Ernest Dickinson on Dudley Ave.
Sunday night about ten o’clock.
Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson and their
daughter, Miss Evangeline, were at
home when someone passing saw the
roof afire and immediately gave the
• (Continued on Page 12)
Sc THB
copy
MISS EVELY REDDEN
WEDS MR. C. S. TULL
Mrs. Louie F. Redden announces
the marriage of her daughter, Evelyn
Hill Redden, to Mr. Calvin Sturgis
Tull, son of Mr. and Mrs. Calvin B.
Tull, of Beaver Dam.
The ceremony was performed Sat
urday evening last at Beaver Dam,
by Rev. Robert B. Stewart and was
witnessed by the immediate members
of the two families and a few friends.
The bride wore a dress of defense
blue with black accessories and her
flowers were a shoulder corsage of
red roses and baby’s breath.
Immediately after the ceremony the
happy couple left for a brief trip to
Atlantic City.
GRAND OFFICERS
EASTERN STAR
VISIT THE CITY
Officially Received By The Lo
cal Chapter, Crescent, On
Monday Last, 10th
In an impressive and beautiful cer
emony, the Grand Officers of the
grand Chapter of Maryland Order of
the Eastern Star, were officially re
ceived by Crescent Chapter, Monday
night.
Prior to the meeting a splendid din
ner was served in the Social Hall of
Bethany Methodist Church by the la
dies of the church. The Grand Offi
cers present were: Worthy Grand
Matron, Mrs. Anna A. Janney of Elk
ton, Worthy Grand Patron, Edgar S.
Hubbard and Mrs. Hubbard of Cam
bridge; Associate Grand Conductress,
Mrs. Elsie Wolfe of Frederick; Grand
Marshall, Mrs. Ann Delgar, of Aber
deen; Grand Organist, Mrs. Mabel
Fleagle, of Baltimore; Grand Esther,
Mrs. Lillie Matthews, of Cambridge;
and Mrs. Florence W. Abernathy,
Grand Electa, of Elkton.
The officers of Crescent Chapter,
headed by the Worthy Matron, Mrs.
Harriet Ham, and the Worthy Patron,
Mr. Robert J. Lambden, followed the
Grands and were seated according to
their rank and these in turn were
(Continued on Page 12)
THANKSGIVING DANCE
BY AMERICAN LEGION
The annual Thanksgiving Dance,
sponsored by the Worcester Post
No. 93 American Legion and Auxil
iary, will be held Thursday night, No
vember 20th in the State Armory, Po
comoke City.
Due to the popularity of the Blue
Serenaders Orchestra which furnished
the music for the Hallowe’en Dance,
this orchestra has been secured for a
return engagement and will be on
hand for the Thanksgiving affair.
Tickets will be on sale at $2.00 per
couple and reservations may be made
through E. Farrel Brown, Telephone
Pocomoke 329-W.
POCOMOKE CITY, MD., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1941
Editorial
We are perfectly aware that we are making a very trite remark when we say this world
is in a turmoil of doubt and uncertainty. Europe is a seething cauldron; or, perhaps, a more fit
ting metaphor would be to describe it as a blazing fiery furnace.
The revolting, slimy, body of a human octopus spreads itself over the center of the conti
nent and reaches out its clinging tentacles to the four corners of the European area. Nation after
nation is sucked into the embrace of a war-mad descendent of a war-mad country, with a war-mad
history dating back to the first century and revealing itself in the Celtic origin of the very word,
“German” itself, which is comprised of “ger,” brave; and “man,” signifying a warlike people.
Once under the dominion of France and Charlemagne, the Empire now terrorizing the
world seems to have inherited the war-like spirit of that ruler, who had the reputation of excelling
all other magnates in matters of war and statesmanship; and of all the dominions of Charles the
Great, the Hunnish government still survives. It is considered as the real successor to the Roman
Empire.
And, as the Roman Empire extended its sway over the entire civilized world, so Germany,
as the heir of that mastery of arms and men, is now seeking a similar seat upon the top of civili
zation. Time and again she has broken the bonds of national regulation; she reduced France to a
begging people in the Franco-Prussian war, and the women of that devoted land sold their golden
tresses to pay a debt to release themselves from chains worse than death. Back in the early years
of the present century, the innate propensities to strife again sent them on a rampage of martial
deeds only to read their doom at Versailles.
The apparent laxity of the nations allowed these restless souls again to arm themeselves
for conquest, and today we see them rolling over European lands with death-dealing machines and
again seeking to establish themselves as worthy successors of dead and gone Charlemagne.
In this situation, we might wonder what the world has to be thankful for. Nothing but the
groans of the dying is heard across the seas. The blood of millions is there drenching the soil. The
homes and firesides of once happy families, now are prey to shot and shell. Human life is in the
hands of ruthless demigogues who value it as they do that of the tiniest insect. Religious teaching
imparts nothing but scorn of Omnipotence and substitutes a worshrprof the god of war. Europe is
a shambles and the end is not yet.
Have we anything for which to be thankful? Yes! Thankful that there is still a nation
which loves peace better than war. A nation whose annals are not one awful recital of war, pesti
lence, and famine. A nation of sturdy, vigorous tenacious, manhood. A nation whose democracy
is as thorough as our own, though it accomplishes its ends under a monarchcial form. A nation
with the fear of God before its eyes and a love of freedom in its heart. A nation slow to move but
determined in its purpose. The British Nation! caught unawares, harboring an insecure plight in
its enjoyment of the blessings of peace. It has now turned to war; its fangs are revealed; its bite
severe; its hold unyielding. The civilized world should indeed offer unstinted and sincere thanks
to Him who holds the sea in the hollow of His hands, and whose might none can oppose.
Have we anything for which to give thanks ? Yes! A younger nation. A nation sprung from
English soil. A nation whose people, from aborigine to president, has never breathed aught but
freedom’s life-giving air. A nation that has shed its blood to obtain rule by the people; died to
maintain it; and is now ready to stand by its mother land; ready to see its flag wave besides the
Union Jack; ready to sail its sons across the waters to stand, side by side, with those combating a
common foe. The United States of America! Americans should give thanks to a wise Providence
that we are what we are.
Have we anything for which to give thanks? Yes! The country of the frozen north. Huge
weighty Russia! A country thought to be weak in martial exploits, but now presenting a disas
trous front to an invading Hun. A country that has astonished the world by its stubborn stand
against a foe swelled to vicious importance by its mastery over the puny nations of Europe. A
nation that has risen in its might, and is slaying by the thousands the enemy of the world. May
more power attend her arms, and success reward her struggles.
Have we anything for which to be thankful? Yes! The unrest that prevails in countries
already subjected by German might. For a people who writhe under a hated administration of
war. Nations whose people send secret aid to the arms of Hitler’s foes. Who refuse to live under
the heel of a despicable mailed hand, and who would rather the sod close over their dead bodies, then
enjoy the sunlight of tyranny.
For all these, let us be thankful. Let us pray the flag of free nations shall be seen in far off
lands of the world; that the time may soon come when, as Holy Writ hath it, “the nations may
beat the swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks and learn war no more.”
HRS. N. TAYLOR
DIED ON TUESDAY
FROH A STROKE
Funeral Services Were Held
From Remsen’s Methodist
Church On Thursday
Mrs. Mollie E. Taylor, wife of Neal
Taylor, died early Tuesday morning,
her death following a paralytic stroke
in the yard of her home near town.
Mrs. Taylor never fully regained con
sciousness, her death occuring within
twenty-four hours after she was
stricken.
Daughter of Mr. William J. Lewis
and the late Mrs. Belle Bunting Lew
is, she was bom in the Welboume
community near Pocomoke in 1884.
When she was 16 years of age she
joined the First Baptist Church in
this city and had been a faithful mem
ber and a regular attendant until
illness incapacitated her from active
work.
She was a devoted wife and a kind
neighbor and friend. She will be
greatly missed from the community
(Continued On Page 6)
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
UNION THANKSGIVING
SERVICE ON NOV. 20TH
The annual Union Thanksgiving
Service will be held on Thursday
morning, November 20, in the Pitts
Creek Presbyterian Church. The ser
vice will commence at 10.30 a. m. Mu
sic will be in charge of Mrs. Dyott,
organist of the host church, who will
be assisted by the combined church
choirs of the city. The ministers of
the Pocomoke churches will take part
in the service. The Thanksgiving
message will be delivered by the Rev.
John Ditto, minister of the First Bap
tist Church. “It is a good thing to
give thanks unto the Lord,” helping
us to be more contented with our lot,
and more appreciative of our bless
ings. A hearty invitation is extended
to every resident of Pocomoke City
and vicinity to be present next Thurs
day morning at the Union Thanksgiv
ing Service.
SENTECED TO HANG
A jury of twelve men found James
Baker, negro, of this city, guilty of
first degree murder and within the
next thirty days Gov. O’Conor will
set a date on which he will be executed.
AN EVANGELISTIC
SCHOOL OPENED
IN SALISBURY
Ministers Of Pocomoke Asked
To Attend Services Running
Through The Week
The ministers of Pocomoke City are
invited to attend the school of Evan
gelism held in Salisbury beginning
Monday and running through the
week.
The School will be conducted by Dr.
Harry K. Denman of Alabama, the
only layman in the U. S. who has a
D. D. who has never been ordained.
He has served in the religious Edu
cation work for years and has been
such a success as a personal worker
he has gone into the work of conduct
ing Schools of “How It Can Be Done.”
The School will run from 9 a. m.,
until noon and then the ministers will
be asked to return to their homes and
visit in the afternoon and put into
practice what has been learned in the
morning.
The Revival conducted in the Bap
(Continued On Page 6)
$1.50 JS
COKESBURY CHURCH TO
OBSERVE HOME-COMING
The Cokesbury M. E. Church, Po
comoke Circuit, will observe their
“Home Coming” on Sunday Novem
ber 23
10.00 a. m., Sunday School and gos
pel songs; 11.00 a. m., Sermon by pas
tor, Rev. J. B. Chadwick; 2.00 p.m,
Praise service; 3.00 p.m., Sermon by
Rev. Tilghman Smith; 7.00 p. m.,
Song and Praise service; 7.30 p.m.,
Sermon by District Superintendent
Dr. Ralph C. Jones. Song leader Mr.
W. V. Taylor, will have special vocal
and instrumental selections. All for
mer pastors are especially invited.
Come! Invite and bring others.
BAPTIST BIBLE
CLASS GAINING
RECOGNITION
Holds Another Semi-Annual
Ladies* Night On Friday
November, Seventh
The Fellowship Class of the First
Baptist Church, this city, a class that
is rapidly gaining state-wide recog
nition because of its large attendance,
held another of its semi-annual La
dies Night Suppers on Friday night,
Nov. 7. This was by far the largest
affair of its type ever held in this
city, 141 being present, and was a
crowning success. It was held in the
dining-room of the local fire hall and
the sumptuous supper was served by
the Ladies Auxiliary of the local fire
company. It was all that could be de
sired and they are to be congratulated
on their appetizing menu.
The first of these suppers was held
in two large Sunday School rooms
and as they outgrew these later they
were held in the Winter Quarters
Club House, which was filled to capa
city. The latest and most successful
to date left very little space in the
large fire hall, company dining room.
The enjoyment of the evening was
further added to by a very enter
taining program carried out by mem
(Continued on Page 12)
COUNTY WOMAN’S CLUB
INVITED TO WICOMICO
The Woman’s Club of Worcester
County has been cordially invited to
meet with the Woman’s Club of Wi
comico County, at 3 P. M., on Tuesday
December 2, at Felowship Hall, in
Salisbury.
A fine arts program will be pre
sented under the direction of Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Schick. The work of these
eminent artists won highest awards
at both the Chicago and the New
York Fairs. This meeting presents a
rare opportunity to the women of
this comunity. It was first planned
for Nov. 18, but due to change in
plans of the artists will be held on
December 2. Please note change of
date.
NEWS AND PICTURE SERVICE
VOLUME 61 NO. 45
ROTARY CLUB
ADDRESSED BY
WM. T. CHILDS
V
Remarks Grouped Around The
All-Important Subject Of
European War
WAS FORMER HEAD
MASTER OF McDONOGH
The local Rotary club was adressed
on Monday night by Mr. William T.
Childs, of Baltimore, and his sub
ject was “What’s Ahead.”
The speaker’s remarks were group
ed around the all-important subject
of the current warfare in Europe,
and he, in a very lucid and logical
manner, ventured into the future and
pictured what he thought was in
store after the conflagration had been
extinguished.
Some of his speculations were fav
orable, some pessimistic, but through
them he apparently saw that right
must prevail, and the world will free •
itself of a rule which denies the
brotherhood of man and the father
hood of God.
William Talbot Childs was bom in
Baltimore County, Maryland, Novem
ber 6, 1878; graduated from McDon
ough School, McDonough, Maryland,
1895; B. L., Baltimore University
School of Law, 1910; deputy comp
(Continued on Page 12)
STATE EMPLOYMENT
EXTENDS OPPORTUNITIES
On another page will be found an
advertisement of the Department of
State Employment and Registration,
which is worthy of attention by rea
sons of the “Democrat.”
This Department is endeavoring to
extend the competitive opportunities
through the counties, and it is im
portant to those interested to note
the closing date and file application
immediately.
COUNTY SEAT
MOURNS DEATH
OF CITIZENS
T. Howard Collins And Dr.
Ferries Pass Away On
The Same Day
Snow Hill was unfortunate on Mon
day last in the death of two of her
prominent citizens: Dr. Sherwood.
Ferries and Thomas Howard Collins,.
Sr., well-known business man.
Dr. Ferries, 64, died after an illness
of several months. The physioiani
moved here five years ago after liv
ing in Washington most of his life..
He served overseas during t%
(Continued on Page 12)

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