OCR Interpretation


Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, November 21, 1941, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1941-11-21/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

H
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
VOSCBSTBIt DEMOCRAT KBT. MM
rBRLRDOBR-RRTRRPBIEBRBT USO
“Omps”^
from the
Democrat’s Pen
Well, Sir, you know David Harum
rid himself, now and then, of some
very wise philsophy, and none wiser
‘.than when he said: “Do unto others
as they would do unto you and do it
*#ost\" That is to say, if a guy comes
up to you with blood in his eye, and
his looks as if he would let fly a hay
maker, the best thing to do is to beat
him to the tape and hind on him, if
possible. The stories we read of these
■ picturesque, romantic, wide-brimmed,
high-booted, wild westerners; those
fallows who carry a six-shooter on
each hip, and one under each arm pit,
always made it a point to draw first,
If the atmosphere seemed a little
heavy. Athletes in a foot-race, gen
erally try to get a lead over the rest
by Jumping first when the gun is
fired. And so it is all through life,
and when one gets left, there’s that
consoling old adage, "Devil take the
hindmost."
. Mow, when somebody comes along
advocating the reverse policy, I al
ways think of the old warning. "Be
ware of Greeks, bearing gifts;" or
seme such homely saw; such as,
"There’s an African concealed in the
stock of winter fuel!" And what I’m
getting at is, when that man Hitter
comes out and says he’s ordered his
ships not to fire on American craft
unless our guns apeak first, I feel
very much like Lincoln said of a man
he was asked to recommend or do the
opposite. He remarked that—there
jwas a rat hole down in the comer of
the man’s office which bore looking
into.
If I’m going to rely on what a fel
low might say, to the effect that he
wasn't going to hit me till I hit him,
% might be lulled into a dangerous
Security which w*euld -result in a bust
ed- snoot, a fractured Jaw, or a wal
lop on the chin sending me to dream
land before I could hit first. Danger
ous to be late in the matter of self
defense.
So, maybe, Mr. Hitler had better
think one or two thoughts about
this you-first-Gascoigne attitude
Tou see, some of these Yankee boys
already have their fingers on the
trigger and are rami’ to go. And
they ain’t such bad shots when you
come to think of it. These old United
State of America have a pretty good
record on the high seas. Ask Great
Britain what she has to say. And
maybe those Algerian pirates might
have some interesting testimony. Also
the Spanish admirals might be will
ing to add a word. So if ffitler gives
our sailor boys a chance to fire first,
there might not be any "Nasty" ship
to send an answer back. Anyhow, I
think the boys fighting under the
Stars and Stripes, will be willing to
take "first go," and Hitter bettor look
out for the second and the third go,
following in rapid succession.
How-some-ever, as I said in the be
ginning, I now repeat: "Beware of
tl|S Greeks, bearing gifts." I’d take
seme more convincing reports as to
who fired the first shot, than what
generally comes over the wires con
cerning the war as the Huns see it.
When a Hitlerite says, "He hit me
first," such a charge needs investiga
tion, if there’s anything left of the
German craft to investigate. If three
weren’t, that fact might or might not
be' proof of the start of hostilities.
There might not be anything left to
tell the tale.
Hut, I don’t think our lads of the
deep, deep, blue, sea are going to be
caught napping by such generosity.
They are going to watch their enemy,
aad when he gurices a motion to draw,
the folks at home can rest assured
Uncle Sam’s Navy ain’t any slouch
in getting into'action.
Further, I don’t believe they will
be influenced by Mr. Hunnish - Hit
ler’s secondary idea. I believe they
will fire first, second ,third just as it
seems fit, and I believe they will give
a good account of themselves. They
don’t need any previous pronounce
ments from the boss of the Fader
land; and, so far as they are concern
ed, he can go his way and our Navy
will sail theirs.
And now, maybe, the boys in blue
will take some good advice from me,
or else rot. Go to it, gobs, and rid the
seas of these under-sea pirates. Blow
all others off the waves. Fly your
flags from ships that make ocean a
free highway. Make it possible for
Europeans peoples to rid themselves
of a bloody tyranny.
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT
SEWING ROOM
NOWOPENED IN
THE CITY HALL
The Hoars Are From 1.30 To
4.30 P. M., When Materials
Will Be Distributed
IDEAL CHANCE TO
FORM ORGANIZATION
The War Production Committee of
the American Red Cross of Worces
ter County has opened a sewing room
at their headquarters in the Municipal
Building. This room will be open
from Monday thru Friday. The hours
are from 1:30 to 4:30 P. M. All ac
tivities will be concentrated there.
Materials for War Production will be
distributed from this location and any
assistance will be cheerfully given.
In case you are unable to visit them
telephone Pocomoke 295 M and your
material will be sent to you.
The quota, which is to be in by De
cember 31st, consists of 168 layette
pieces, 14 dozen diapers to be hem
med, 12 hospital bed shirts, 6 opera
ting gowns, 3 women’s cotton dresses,
10 boys shirts and 48 knitted gar
ments. These garments consist of 3
(Continued'on Page 12)
STATE HIGHWAY WORK
GREATEST IN HISTORY
Maryland will shortly be engaged
in the greatest highway construction
projects in its history, Governor Her
bert R. O’Conor made known today
after a report from the State Beads
Commission. >. . , ■
A total of funds on hand and ex
pected for highway constrvetlon was
announced by Governor O’Conor as
$30,281,788. Expenditure of such an
amount, or even programming of
such expenditures within a period of
a single year, would entail four to
five times an average years’ activity
for the State Roads Commission.
Among the projects provided for
are: approaches to Ocean City
bridge, $452,907; approaches to Her
ring Creek bridge, $226,419; Yacht
Basin Road, Ocean City, $45,000; and
Pocomoke City—Virginia, 4 miles,
$450,000.
CCC CAMP, S-69
IN THIS COUNTY
RE-ESTABLISHED
Abandoned In July It Was Re
vived By State Forest And
Parks Commission
The CCC Camp S-69, in Worcester
County, abandoned in July, has been
reoccupied, is an announcement made
by the newly created Commission of
State Forests and Parks, a member
of which is Mr. J. Miles Lankford, of
Pocomoke City. Along 'with other
prominent Eastern Shore citizens, Mr.
Lankford last summer made strong
representation to CCC authorities a
gainst the camp’s removal. Work to
be undertaken by the reestablished
camp will include the development of
a recreational area at Melbourne
Landing, on the Pocomoke River, and
of several new picnic grounds within
the Pocomoke State Forest, one of
which will be set aside for the use of
colored people. Other plans call for
forest stand improvement on lands
recently turned over to the Depart
ment of State Forests and Parks by
the Farm Security Administration.
In addition to Mr. Lankford, other
members of the Commission of State
Forests and Parks are John M. Nel
son, Jr., chairman, Baltimore; Ber
nard I. Gonder, Oakland; J. Wilson
Lord, Ellicott City; and Sidney D.
Beverly, Bel Air.
MRS. LANDING ILL
Relatives and friends of Mrs. Win
field Landing of Pocomoke City re
gret very much to learn that she is at
present a patient at the Union Mem
orial Hospital, in Baltimore. It is the 1
sincere wish of all who know her that <
the time will be very short before
she will be home again, entirely well.
C r THE
COPY
WILLIAM GORDY, 25
FOUND DEAD LAST WEEK
William Gordy, 25, of Willards, was
found dead Friday last in a hotel
room in* Ocean City. The hotel room
> burst into flames as an attendant
opened the door to call him.
Dr. John L. Riley, deputy medical
1 examiner, gave a verdict of death by
smoke suffocation. It is thought Gor
dy had gone to sleep and dropped a
lighted cigarette which ignited the
bedclothes. „
WYE OAK SEED
TREES NOW PUT
ON PUBLIC SALE
Income From Sale Goes Into The
Wye Oak Fund For Care
Of Tree And Grounds
The Wye Oak at Wye Mills in Tal
bot County, Maryland, the largest
white oak on record in the United
States, inspired the Maryland Gener
al Assembly of 1941 to adopt the
white oak as the Maryland Arboreal
Emblem.
This giant white oak, standing by
the side of the State Highway, has a
trunk measurement of 50 feet at the
base, 27 feet 8 inches at a height of
4 1-2 feet, a branch spread of 165
feet, a height of 95 feet and is esti
mated to be 400 years old.
The State of Maryland, (through
the State Department of Forestry)
purchased the tree, including the 1
1-4 acres of ground upon which it
stands, in 1940, and now administers
it as a miniature State Park, under
the Department of State Forests and
Parks.
Seed from this tree was planted in
a special Bed In the State Forest Nur
sery, and genuine seedlings from the
Wye Oak are now available for dis
tribution. Three sizes are offered at
the following rates, including pack
ing and shipping charges anywhere
in Maryland. Remittance should ac
company order:
6 to 12 inches, one tree, $.75 addi
tional trees, $.25 each.
12 to 18 inches, one tree, SI.OO, ad
ditional trees, $.35.
18 to 24 inches, one tree, $1.25, ad
ditional trees, $.50 each.
Each tree bears the certificate of
the State Forester that it is a genu
ine Wye Oak Seedling, and with a
clean bill of health.
The income from the sale of trees
goes into the Wye Oak Fund for the
care of the tree and grounds. Here is
an opportunity to secure an offspring
from a giant of the species, well
known for its long life and magnifi
cent proportions.
HASTINGS-MARRINER
WEDDING ANNOUNCED
Announcement is made of the mar
riage of Miss Mildred Virginia Hast
ings, of Wattsville, Va., to Mr. Jer
mond Lee Marriner, of Pocomoke
City, Md.
The ceremony was performed on
October 29, 1941, by the Rev. R. J.
Sturgill, at Elkton, Md. They will re
side in Pocomoke City, where the
groom holds a position.
P. AND T. ASSOC.
HOLDS REGULAR
MEET THURSDAY
Most Important Business Was
The Discussion Of A New
Elementary Building
YEAR PROGRAM IS
THEME OF "OUR TOWN”
The Parent-Teacher Association
held its regular meting on Thursday
evening, November 13, in the Elemen
tary school building. Mrs. Dawson
Clarke, President, presided over the
meeting. Many patrons were pres
ent, and all seemed interested in the 1
discussions. * :
The most important business was :
(Continued On Pag* 7) 1
AND
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
POCOMOKE CITY. MD., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1941
LOCAL PASTOR
ADDRESSES THE
VA. RBMTAWS
Rev. R. B. Stewart, Pitts Creek
Presbyterian Church, Is The
Speaker At Banquet
The annual Ruritan Farm Show
Banquet of the Eastern Shore of
Maryland and Virginia, was held at
Central High School, Painter, Virgin
ia, Friday, November 14th, at 6 P. M.
Two hundred and fifty Ruritan mem
bers and guests attended the ban
quet. Mr. Francis Rogers, local Vo
cational Agricultural instructor acted
as toastmaster. Reverend Robert
Stewart, pastor of Pitts Creek and
First Presbyterian Churches of Poco
moke was guest speaker. Rev. Stew
art spoke on “The International Sit
uation And Its Effect Upon Us."
The music and entertainment were
furnished by Mrs. W. L. Cosby, Mrs.
Raleigh Hobbs, Mrs. Polk Kellam,
Mrs. John VanKestren, Mrs. Fulton
Ayres, and Miss Dorothy Wise.
Among the distinguished guests
present were: Mr. and Mrs. Tom
Downing, of Ivor, Virginia; Mr.
Downing was responsible for organiz
ing the first Ruritan club at Holland,
Virginia, in 1928. Since that time
over one hundred and twenty clubs
have been chartered in Virginia,
North and South Carolina, Maryland,
and Tennessee, Pop Rogers, District
Governor for the Shore is trying hard
to organize several new clubs in
Maryland, Virginia and Delaware.
POCOMOKE IS
PLANNING FOR
’4l CHRISTMAS
t
Public Is Assured By Merchants
That City Will Measure Up
To Fqrmer Seasons
DECORATIONS WILL BE
PLACED AT EARLY DATE
In line with past seasons Pocomoke
is planning for another Merry Christ
mas full of fun and entertainment for
all holiday shoppers and . visitors.
Christmas is a season of light, laugh
ter, friendliness and faith and Poco
moke merchants and business men
have always entered into the spirit
of the Yuletide by presenting a pro
groom chock full of real enjoyment.
Further anouncement of plans will
be made later but the public may be
assured the merchants of Pocomoke
appreciate their patronage and will
do all in their power to make it worth
their while to shop here and will offer
special entertainment during their
shopping.
For weeks Christmas merchandise
has been arriving and is being display
ed as fast as it is received. As usual
(Continued on Page 12)
THREE MEN KILLED
NEAR FRUITLAND, MD.
The highways are still taking their
toll of death as was evidenced on last
Saturday night when a Mount Her-j
man Negro was killed on the spot and.
two Fruitland men died in Salisbury's
Peninsula General Hospital as a re
sult of a head-on-collision between two
automobiles near Fruitland.
Benjamin Franklin White, 55, a
contracting carpenter ,of Fruitland,
died in the hospital at 8 o’clock this
morning, about one hour after the ac
cident. James D. Brown, 60-year old
retired mail carier who lived near
Fruitland, sucumbed to injuries two
hours later.*
Samuel Bounds, Mount Herman
Negro, was found dead by police at
the scene of the accident.
State police said a dense early
morning fog evidently obscured the
view of the operators of the two cars.
Injured were Fred Water, Camden
(N. J.) Negro, who suffered frac
tures of the ankle and pelvis and Cor
nelius Bounds, Negro, of Moorestown,
N. J. Both were treated at the Salis
bury Hospital. i ,
AMERICAN LEGION
AUXILIARY MET
NOVEMBER 7TH
; Members Of Worcester Post
Joined Ladies In A Social
Hour And Refreshments
The District meeting of the South
Eastern Shore District, American
Legion Auxiliary took place at the
Country Club House Friday evening,
November 7th. The new vice-presi
dent, Mrs. Thompson of Salisbury,
presided.
After the business meeting and
presentation of gifts, Mrs. Henry
| Watson entertained with several vo
! cal selections accompanied by Mrs.
Anna G. McClure and Rev. J. W.
Wootten spoke on “Peace" which was
timely and impressive. Gifts were
presented to Mrs. L. G. Callahan,
Past vice-president by Mrs. Roy F.
Mason, Past Secretary of the District
and by the Trophies and Awards
chairman Mrs. Stanley Lankford to
Mrs. George Hartman, a Past Presi
dent.
Members of Worcester Post joined
the ladies in a social hour which fea
tured a humorous reading by Mr.
Wootten and impromptu speeches and
readings by Mrs. Thompson of Salis
bury, Commander Ewell Dryden and
others. Delicious refreshments were
served and announcement was made
of the next meeting to be held in Sal
isbury.
INSPECTION OF
RIVER PROJECT
ON MONDAY, 17
Headwaters Of Pocomoke Drain
ed For 31/2 Miles Of A Pro
posed 14.4
INSPECTORS FETED BY
CAMP WICOMICO MEN
In November of last year, a pro
ject was started looking to the drain
age of the upper waters of the Poco
moke River, from near Snow Hill, to
the line of Delaware, a distance, in
the beginning, estimated to be 17.28
miles, but later cut down to 14.4
miles.
The average depth of cut is about
seven feet, with a bottom width, at
the point of beginning of sixty feet
and a top width of eighty-eight feet.
At the Maryland-Delaware State
Line the bottom width has been re
duced to twenty feet and top width
to forty-four feet. The slope of
the hydraulic gradient for the lower
nine miles of channel is .0275%, and
for the remaining five miles, .0300%.
Five survey crews, containing four
to six enrollees per crew, were used
(Continued on Page 12)
HEALTH DEPARTMENT AN
NOUNCES COUNTY CLINICS
The Worcester County Health De
partment has arranged the following
schedule for clinics during the re
mainder of the month of November:
Fri. 21, Prenatal Cliific—all day,
Berlin, 10:30 A. M.; Veneral Disease
. Clinic, Berlin, 7 P. M.
Mon. 24, Read Shick Tests in
Stockton School, 1 P. M.; Tues. 25,
Maternal and Child Hygiene Clinic,
Berlin, 1.30 P. M.; Veneral Disease
I Clinic, Pocomoke, 7.30 P. M.; Wed.
26, Maternal and Child Hygiene Clin
ic, (Pediatric Consultant) Pocomoke,
1.30 P. M., Veneral Disease Clinic,
Pocomoke, 7.30 P. M.; Thurs. 27,
Shick and Toxoid—Pocomoke School,
1 P. M., Child Hygiehe Clinic, Berlin,
1.30 P. M., Veneral Disease Clinic,
Snow Hill, 7.30 P.M.; Fri. 28, Ven
ereal Disease Clinic, Berlin, 7 P. M.;
Sat. 29, Nurses’ Conferences, Poco- 1
moke.
Worcester County Public Health
Association Birth Control Clinics,
Snow Hill, November 28, 1.30 P. M. 1
1 1
IN ERROR <
In the Baptist Bible school article i
last week, the name of Mrs. H. H. s
Appleton was omitted. The Democrat £
apoligizes to her.
$1.50/.“A
MORE SECOND GROWTH
APPLES BY MR. ARMS
[This year seems to be producing
very unusual growth and among them
is the second crop of apples.
Mr. C. J. Ardis brings to the "Dem
t ocrat" office perfect specimens of •
little red apple which came off a tree
which bore them on the 16th of No
vember, the first crop having been
! harvested on July 1.
1 This is the second exhibit that has
. been brought to the notice of this pa
i Per*
MOTORISTS ARE
SLOW IN their
INSPECTIONS
. Safety Campaign Began On No
vember First, To Continue
Till December Fifteenth
State Commissioner, W. Lee Elgin
reports that only .a small percentage
of motorists have responded to the
call for the annual inspection of mo
tor vehicles, which is compulsory by
law.
"This highway sefety campaign
started onNovember first, and will
continue until December 16th. There
are approximately 660.000 car* and
trucks to be checked for faulty equip
ment, such as steering, tires, wind
shield wiper, discolored or broken
windshields, king bolts, headlights,
tail lights, and brakes.
"I have received an indorsement
from the Maryland Traffic Safety
Commission urging a more rigid
check for faulty parts on motor ve
hicles, which in turn will reduce the
increase in accidents. I have asked
all Ri the 1886 inspection stations
throughout the State to cooperate
, with us in ridding the highway’s un
safe cars.
"It is unfortunate that Maryland
does not have State owned and oper
ated inspection stations as does the
State of New Jersey and the District
[ of Columbia. During the past sever
al months, there has been a large in
. crease in registrations in Maryland,
. due to the defense work being carried
on here. In a great number of cases,
, old cars that have been ruled off the
! highways of our neighboring States
I are being sold here for transportation
l of workers. These vehicles are not
safe and should be junked, but until
; we have State operated stations, it
■ will be a problem to completely. cope
; with this serious situation. Every
, used car sold here should be given a
. safety test before being turned over
. to a new owner, and this would be
, done if our stations were State oper
> ated."
1 TUBERCULOSIS CLINICS
FOR DECEMBER MONTH
The Maryland Tuberculosis Asso
ciation has arranged the following
schedule for December for the three
lower counties of the Shore:
1 Snow Hill, December 6, Health De
partment Building, 10.00 A. M.
Crisfield, December 9, Health Cen
ter Building, 10.00 A. M.
Salisbury, December 19, Health De
partment office, Court House, 9 A. M.
ANNUAL SALE
OF XMAS SEALS
AFTER HOLIDAY
Chance To Help Fight Tubercu
losis To Be Given A Few Days
After Thanksgiving
ONE IN EVERY EIGHT
DIE FROM THIS CAUSE
“Here’s another chance for every
body to help in the fight against tu
berculosis,” Dr. R. H. Riley, Director
of the State Department of Health
said in calling attention to the open
ing of the annual sale of Christmas
seals for the benefit of the various
services used in the care, control and
(Continued on Page 7)
Maryland Room.
NEW* aura nuiu RE SERVtCM
VOLUME 61 NO. 46
.500 SCOOTERS
! ASSEMBLE HERE
IN HIGH SCHOOL
1 ——
! They Cane From Lower Penin
i solt Area Including Salisbury,
- frocomoke, And Virginia
> -
DISTRICT OFFICERS
ELECTED FOR 1941-2
More than 500 Seouters and Boy
Scoots in the Lower Peninsula Area
which includes Salisbury, Poeomofea
and Virginia Districts participated hi
a Court of Honor and Bally at the Po
comoke High School on Priday, No
vember 24th.
76 Scouts received more than 129 a
wards at one of the largest Court of
Honors ever to be held in this Area.
Godfrey Child, Advancement
Chairman of the Pocomoke District,
and Edward W. Ham, Chairman of
148, Pocomoke and Howard A. Solo
mon, Scout Executive, made the a
wards. Tired Tenderfoot award
again goes to Troop 148, Pocomoke.
Several higher ranks of Scouting
were presented to the Scouts of the
District. Rabbi Stephen, Sherman,
Troop 186, Salisbury, Scoutmaster,
(Continued on Page 12)
TUBER MOTH INFECTIONS
FOUND IN LATE SPUDS
Considerable tuber moth infection
has been found in the late seed pota
to crop this fall and growers are
warned to check up on the amount of
the infestation in their seed.
Due to the extremely dry year, tu
ber moth infestation has been encour
aged in this area and if potatoes are
not kept in cold storage, considerable
injury may result..
According to E. N. Cory, State En
tomologist, the surest method of
keeping down the spread of this In
sect in seed is to place the seed in
cold storage where the temperature
is so low there will be little or no ac
tivity. When the temperature is 46
degrees or above, the moth will con
tinue to work. Dr. Cory stated that
disinfectants did not give satisfactory,
results.
s. w westcoit
KENT COUNTY
DIED WEDNESDAY
Was Known In This Section An
A Stationery Salesman,
Baltimore Firm
I *
Mr. Simon W. Westcott, a traveling
salesman, well known in this section
by those who dealt in his wares, sta
tionery, died on Wednesday morning
in Chestertown, at the home of his
brother-in-law, R. Hynson Rogers,
Esq., where he was stricken last week.
Mr. Westcott was a descendant of
one of Kent's most prominent fami
lies. He was an honorary member of
the Eastern Shore County Commis
sioners’ Association and was one of
the founders and first president of
the Kent County Historiacl Society.
His widow, the former Miss Elisa
beth Hurtt; a.son, S. W. Westcott, Jr.,
and two daughters, Miss Mary Wood
land Westcott and Mrs. Robert L.
Bryan, of Seaford, Del., survive him
Funeral services will be held at 2
o’clock tomorrow afternoon from the
Shrewsbury Episcopal Church where
he was a vestryman.
The deceased was a man who en
joyed to the full the great privileges
of life. His pleasing personality
gained him many friends, both in a
business and in a social way. He was
energetic, enthusiastic, honorable, and
upright in all his dealings. He hjl
achieved much success in a material
way; had only recently settled him
self in a country home in his native
county, and seemed as a comparative
ly young man just getting ready to
live, when the summons came. He
has been known since his early child
hood by the editor of this paper, and
to his family and friends we extend
heartfelt sympathy.

xml | txt