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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, March 13, 1942, Image 1

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1 . ■ ■ L'IJT
UNITED STATES
' DEFENSE 9
BONDS
AND
STAMPS
U|l'
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOf'RA T EST. 1898
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE EST 1880
“Chirps*’^*
from the
Democrat’s Pen
Well, Sir, you know we—and when
I say “we,” I don’t mean you folks
—we give these post office guys Hail
Columbia once in a while. We are ex
pecting a leter, and they won’t bring
it to us as quickly as we think they
should. We order merchandise, and
it sometimes goes all the way round
the north pole before it gets here. We
find the mail of all the folks in our
vicinity thrown into our box, and vice
versa —that is, our mail takes up
room in somebody else’s two by four
cubicle. And I don’t know what else,
but there’s plenty.
How-some-ever, you got to hand it
to ’em, they come across sometimes
in great shape and you just wonder
how they do it. As an instance I re
ceived a letter last week with this
so-called direction on the outside of
the envelope:
The State News Editor, —
Woster Democrat,
Woster, Maryland.
I suppose the word “Maryland, ’
was the key word in that wonderful
attempt at superscription. Otherwise
I just don’t know how the initial post
master knew’ whether to start it on
its ways to Alaskan climes, to the
Phillipines, to India’s coral strand, to
Gape Horn, to Patagonia, to Califor
nia’s Golden Gate, to British Colom
bia; across the western continent, or
to the South Sea Islands.
But it got to Pocomoke City all
the same, and right side up with care.
Now, it might be that the “Democrat”
was the favorite paper of somebody
who knew just where it was publish
ed and what sort or reading matter it
contained. The letter reached here
with, “Try Pocomoke City,” written
below the enigmatic “Woster” sym
bol, and Pocomoke was the destina
tion. You people may have read the
item that was type written on the
sheet inside the envelope. It was con
cerning the promotion of a Stockton
boy who had answered the call of his
country for service and, apparently,
was giving a good account of himself.
He wanted the people in “Woster” to
know about it.
There may be just another explana
tion: The letter went to a little vil
lage up in Kent County by the names
of Worton. It may be that the post
master in that burg knew something
about a man who has spent 35 years
of his life in that section, and may
have known he was in the newspaper
business in “Pocomoke City—hence,
“Try Pocomoke City.”
Anyhow the post office department
is responsible for the letters reach
ing its proper destination, and I reck
on when I feel disposed to cuss the
officials out again, I’ll just manufac
ture a slogan and paste in my hat:
“Remember the Woster,” or some
thing like that, similar to /‘Remem
ber the Maine,” or “Remember Pearl
Harbor” —although those two would
make a man cuss, rather than make
■him count ten before he does.
Everybody makes mistakes, how
ever; we wouldn’t be human if we
didn’t. I made a big mistake a week
• r so ago when I didn’t lift my foot
high enough to escape a curb, and I
landed on the inside of the pavement
with my head trying the resisting
power of a show window’s base. I
think that curb must have been just
a little higher than usual. It reminds
me of that story about that young
fellow who took his girl out riding in
one of those Austin cars.
He drew up on the side of the
street, and his girl asked:
“What large building is this, I
can’t see the top of it?”
“That’s no building,” the young
fellow replied,” that’s the curb
stone.”
I think that curbstone 1 struck
must have been, at least, as high as
the Austin car. I felt like I was fall
ing from the Eiffel Tower, Washing
ton’s Monument, or Pike’s Peak.
Next time, I’m going to “Watch my
step.”
And, just byway of closing, this is
a time when everybody should watch
his step. This country is faced with
a big proposition; it’s costing big
money: it’s costing big loss of life
and territory; it’s going to take a big
©fort to preserve us from Old World
despotism jit’s a bigger job than any
defender of Democracy ever conceiv
ed it; we are fighting to save the big
gest ideas in government ever born
in the brain of man; it’s going to take
(Continued on Page 10)
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT
FARMERS’ NIGHT;
STAGED MONDAY
BY ROTARIANS
About Seventy Persons In At
tendance At This Annual
Social Function
PROF. STEWART S. SHAW
SPEAKER OF THE EVENING
The Pocomoke City Rotary Club j
staged its annual Farmers’ Night on
Monday last, at which about 70 per
sons were present, including the mem
bers and guests.
Prof. Stewart S. Shaw, of the Uni
versity of Maryland, was the speaker
of the evening and his speech was di
rected to the farmers concerning
their tomato crop and their contracts
with the canners. He advised they a
dopt a straight forward plan during
these troublous times, and make ear
ly contracts instead of taking chances
on prices.
Two of the Future Farmers of
(Continued on Page 10)
- - -
REHABILITATION FOR
SOUTH EASTERN SHORE
The State Commander has authoriz
ed a Rehabilitation Conference for the
South-eastern Shore District to be
held Friday, March 20th at 8 P. M.,
at the American Legion Headquar
ters, 208 Broad Street, Salisbury,
Md.
If you have any problems in con
nection with claims, etc. Richard C.
Manning will be there Friday after
noon, March 20th and gladly assist
you with them.
Mr. Joseph A. Cantrel, Membership
Chairman, will address the meeting
that evening.
FIREMEN WILL
STAGEftDEFENSE
MOTION FILMS
Will Hold Meeting In High
School Auditorium On Tues
day Evening Next
The Pocomoke City Volunteer Fire
Department has arranged for what
will, no doubt, prove to be a very in
teresting and educational defense
program, to be staged in the Auditor
ium of the High School building on
Tuesday evening next, March 17, at
7.30 o’clock. Everybody is invited and
j there is no charge for admission.
I The feature of the evening will be
a sound motion picture showing the
appearance, construction, and opera
tion of the fire bombs, now in use by
the nations engaging in modern war
fare. No one wishes to be an alarm
ist, but all who know anything a
bout geography realize that Worces
ter county has an exposed line of sea
coast, and also that the enemy is
waging his fight very near the shores.
Pocomoke City, in an air line, is
close to the water, and it is plain,
might, see some of the real action of
the war. It behooves everybody to
(Continued on Page 5)
MD. STATE GUARDHAS
SET-UP FOR ALL RUMORS
During these times, rumors are be
ing spread abroad, many of which
can do harm. The Maryland State
Guard has in its organization a set up
to investigate any subversive activi
ty. It is of the utmost importance
that,should any person be legitima
tely suspected of any unpatriotic ac
tivity, he should be reported to the
proper authority immediately. Should
any activity out of the ordinary take
I place in your particular section, the
same should be reported to the prop
er authority.
It is requested that all citizens liv
ing in the vicinity of Pocomoke be on
the alert for anything to the detri
ment of the country and report the
jsame to: The Intelligence Dept., Co.
A. 4th Bn., State Armory, Pocomoke
■City, Md.
the
OL COPY
LEAGUE PRESIDENT IS
NOW IST LIEUTENANT 1
Harry S. Russell, editor of “The i
Enterprise,” a weekly paper publish
ed in Chestertown, Md., has been com
missioned a First Lieutenant in the
U. S. Army, and will leave for active
duty on March 18. It is understood
that his brother, Emerson Russell,
will take over the business end of the
newspaper business while Calvert
Jones, student editor of the Washing-
ton College ELM. will edit the paper. (
Mr. Russell, as all base ball fans (
and many others know, is president
of the Eastern Shore Base Ball Lea
gue, which has suspended operations
“for the duration.” Harry is to be
commended for offering his services
to his country, and it is to be hoped
he may not be exposed to balls any j
more dangerous than those which fur- |
nished the ammunition for the dia- 1
monds of the Shore League.
H. T THORNTON
OF NEW CHURCH
*
LOSES HIS LIFE
Crashes Into A Truck Stalled
By Reason Ot Its Battery Sud- \]
denly Going “Dead"
j
Mr. Henry T. Thornton, a promi
| nent citizen of New Church, Va., was j
instantly killed on Wednesday morn-.
! ing last, when the car in which he!
| was riding and which he was driving
! crashed into a truck loaded with pi-;
j ling. It is said that the battery in the
i truck “went dead” suddenly and the
i truck came to a practical standstill
! causing the two machines to collide, i
(Continued on Page 5)
REPORT OF THE 1
TUBERCULOSISi
ASSOCIATION
12 Clinics Held In Worcester
County; 241 Patients Were
Examined; 123 White
DEATH RATE THOUGHT
TO BE MUCH REDUCED
1,000 more patients were examined
in the diagnostic clinics of the Mary- j
land Tuberculosis Association during
1941 than in the previous year, it was
announced at the Association’s head- !
quarters today. Also, in 1941 30 addi
tional clinics were held.
These free clinics are held in all of
the counties of Maryland by the
Maryland Tuberculosis Asociation in
cooperation with the State Depart- (
ment of Health and in every county 1
with the exception of four, there was
at least one clinic per month.
During the year there were a total
of 352 clinics in which 7,002 patients
were examined. Of the total number 1
(Continued on Page 10)
MISS V.T. JONES
BECOMES BRIDE OF
MR. MATTHEWS
Pretty Wedding Solemnized At
The Home Of Mr. And Mrs.
Bryan Groton
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Bryan
Groton was the scene of a pretty wed- ,
ding on Saturday, March 7 at 8 o’-
clock, when Miss Virginia Lee Jones,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Elton
Jones of Stockton became the bride <
of Mr. William S. Matthews, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Matthews of
Girdletree.
Miss Jones was a student of Stock
ton High School and Mr. Mathews <
graduated from Stockton High School,
class of 1938. i
The home was decorated with ev-11
ergreens and lighted by candles. The <
j marriage took place before an arch j]
of evergreens. <
Preceding the ceremony, Mrs. Har-j<
(Continued on Page 5)
EHE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
POCOMOKE CITY, MD., FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 1942
AND
AIR-RAID TO
BE ANNOUNCED
BY THE SIRENS
Information Of Valuable Sort
Passed Out By Messrs. Child
\nd Bunting
By order of Godfrey Child, Com
mander; and Leslie C. Bunting, Direc
tor of Signals, the following informa
tion concerning air raid signals has
been compiled and should be carefully !
noted by the public:
Air Raid Signal
Until further signals are installed,
Pocomoke City will blow both fire
sirens for an air raid signal.
The fire siren on the new fire house
(Fifth Street) will not be used as a
fire alarm until further notice. When
ever this siren blows, it is an Air
Raid Signal.
In the event of an Air Raid or Prac
tice Blackout, the fire siren on the
new fire house (Fifth Street) will
start to blow, followed almost imme
diately by the fire siren on the old
fire house (Willow Street).
Signal Ror An Air Raid Or Practice
Blackout
Both sirens will bltw for two min
utes or more with a slight waving or
warbling sound.
All Clear Signal
Both sirens will blow for two min
(Continued on Page 6)
HOME NURSING CLASS
WILL ATTRACT JOINERS
It isn’t too late to join the Saturday
night Home Nursing Class held from
7 to 9 o’clock. This course is abso
lutely free and you will not be called
upon to r go outside or do any outside j
nursing. It is simply for the protec
tion and benefit of your own family.
Any person interested in this Sat
urday night Home Nursing Class is
asked to call Pocomoke 250.
sandTpoint
IS ACQUIRED FOR
A TERMINAL
Annapolis Deserted Since Ter
minal There Is Bought By
Naval Academy
j The State Roads Commission has
1 completed negotiations for the acqui
sition of a site at Sandy Point for the
Western Shore terminal of the State
owned Chesapeake Bay ferry system.
Governor O’Conor, announcing that
negotiations were for 1,400 foot of
frontage on the bay and about fifty
acres of right-of-way toward the Gov
ernor Ritchie Highway said the Roads
J Commission indicated it would ask
for bids on the project by the end of
(Continued on Page 5)
ORGAN RECITAL
ATTRACTS MANY
MUSIC LOVERS
Bradshaw’s Funeral Parlors
Capacity Tested On Thurs
day Evening, sth
THE HAMMOND ORGAN
AN ELECTRIC WONDER
I The “S. R. O.” sign had to be dis
played at Bradshaw’s Funeral Par
lors on Thursday evening of last!
week, the occasion being an organ re
cital and the instrument used being
the Hammond Electric organ; and
the organist being John H. Elterman,
former Dean of the Chesapeake
Chapter of the American Guild of
Organists.
Mr. Frederick Stieff, of Baltimore,
connected with the old and well
known piano people, was in charge
of the recital, and at the beginning
had Mr. Eitermann show the audi
ence the many wonderful tones that
could be produced on an organ with
(Continued on Page 10)
SHORE CHEMIST
SHOWS FORMULA
MAKING RUBBER
Homer Pilkinton, 44, (Jets His
Experimental Training At
Heidelberg, Germany
I Necessity is the mother of inven- j
tion and, as there is a necessity for
j rubber, the invention is forthcoming, j
According to the story a cook-stove,
chemicals and a common plant may
provide the answer to the rubber
shortage.
With chemistry courses at Heidel
berg as his background, a kitchen as
his laboratory and a common Eastern
Shore plant as his material, a Wicom
ico county farmer has produced some
thing that feels, looks, and acts like
rubber.
The inventor is Homer Pilkinton,
14, a native of Missouri and an East
ern Shore farmer since 1932.
Two crude samples of his product
have been sent to the National In- i
ventors’ council in Washington to de
termine the discovery’s value in the !
war effort.
The samples were crude, he ex
plained, because of his makeshift
equipment. He said he used the com
mon plant as the base and easily ob
(Continued on Page 10)
MASONIC FRATERNITY TO j
HEAR HON. T.R. McKELDIN
Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin,
Baltimore City, will address the Ma
sonic Fraternity of the Eastern Shore
of Maryland on Thursday evening,
March 19, at Coats Lodge, Easton,
Md. A large group of Master Masons
from all the counties of the Shore will
be present. This meeting is sponsor
ed by the Pastmasters of the Shore.
AUTO CLUB TO
! GIVE REWARD FOR
THIEF ARRESTS
One Hundred Dollars Paid For
Conviction Of Robbers Of
Club Members’ Cars
A reward of SIOO will be paid by
; Keystone Automobile Club for the
arrest and conviction of any thief who
steals tires from the cars of Club
- members.
In posting the rewai'd, which ap
, plies to all territories served by the
' Club in Pennsylvania, New Jersey,
Maryland and the District of Colum
bia, Keystone issued the following
i statement:
i “Tires today are not just an article
(Continued on Page 5)
MRS. BRANNER
DIED MARCH 9
BETHESDA, MD.
Body Brought To Pocomoke On
Wednesday And Interred In
Presbyterian Cemetery
WAS SISTER OF CLAYTON
T. DAVIS, OF THIS CITY
Mrs. Clara Maybelle Branner, wife !
|of Claude E. Branner, passed away
Monday, March 9th at her home in
| Bethesda, Md. Although she had
been ill for sometime, the news of
her death came as a shock to relatives
and friends here.
The body was brought to Pocomoke
Wednesday and funeral services held
from the Presbyterian Church at 2
p m., the Rev. Robert B. Stewart of
ficiating. Interment was made in the
j cemetery of the same denomination,
j The pallbearers were brothers of Mr.
Branner: Cecil G., Harry J., B. 8.,,
John C., William Z., and Kenneth L.
Branner.
The deceased is survived by her 1
(Continued on Page 10)
NEWS AND PICTURE SERVICE
$1.50 T ™
QUIET WEDDING AT
SNOW HILL CHURCH!
A quiet but very pretty wedding
was solemnized Thursday, March 5,
at 9 p. m., when Miss Ada Virginia |
Phillips, daughter of Mrs. Emma
Phillips of this city, became the bride
of Mr. William Linwood McDaniel,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward McDan
iel also of this city.
The ceremony was performed in the
Parsonage of the Methodist Church
; in Snow Hill by Rev. Elmer Shields,
j and was witnessed by Mr. and Mrs.
| Linwood Niblett.
The bride wore an ensemble of
foam blue with matching accessories, i
! Mr. and Mrs. McDaniel will reside'
in Pocomoke where Mrs. McDaniel is
employed as cashier in the J. J. New
bery Store and the former operates .
the Dryden Poultry Market which !
was opened by the Dryden Milling
Company in September of last year.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO SNOW HILL’S
FIRST CITIZEN
|
Mr. Benjamin T. Truitt Is
Chosen For The Honor By
The Men’s Civic Club
Congratulations are due and ex
tended to Mr. Benjamin Truitt, of
I Snow Hill, who was chosen by the
Men’s Civic Club as the outstanding
citizen of Worcester’s shore town.
Those who know Mr. Truitt realize
that the club made no error in their
choice, and that he constitutes a fine
pattern by which future aspirants for
(Continued on Page 5)
SCHOOL RECORDS
OF ATTENDANCES
SHOW DECREASES
I Slightly Less Than In February
I Of Last Year. Pocomoke A
Tops The Graded List
1 STOCKTON SHOWS WAY
. TO THE HIGH SCHOOLS
School attendance records for the
month of February, 1942, show all
groups fell slightly behind the grades
made for the month of February,
1941. The general average for the
high schools in ’4l was 91.8; this
year 90.8. Graded schools, 89.7 in
1941; in ’42, 87.5. Two-teac'her
’ schools, 92.4 in ’4l; in ’42, 88.5. One
i teacher, 94 in ’4l; 92.2 in ’42.
Stockton leads the high schools
this year with 90.9; Ocean City; 94.8;
j Pocomoke, 91.7; Berlin, 89.2; Snow
Hill, 88.4. The first three in this list
improved their 1941 mark and, there
fore, are decorated with a “scar.”
Pocomoke A tops the graded school
list with a mark of 93.1 Ocean City,
(Continued on Page 10>
QUINTON S CLUB
OF HOMEMAKERS
AT MRS.j .PAYNE’S
“Build Health By Nutrition
Yardstick," One Of The Mat
ters Discussed
The regular meeting of the Quinton
Homemakers Club was held at the
home of Mrs. Emory Payne, March
5,. The president, Mrs. Ralph Gordy,
opened the meeting with “An Irish
Love Song,” the Londonderry Air,
followed by the Lord’s Prayer. The
minutes of the last meeting were read
by the secretary Mrs. Stanley Lank
ford.
After the salute to the flag, Mrs.
Lumma Matthews read a paper on
j “Defense of Our Democracy.” The
home demonstration agent, Miss Top
fer presented the topic “Build Health
by nutrition yardstick,” seeing that
our families are properly fed in view
iof the new adjustments that must be
(Continued on Page 10)
gZESM
UNITED STATES
DEFENSE
BONDS
AND
STAMPS
VOLUME 62 NO. 11
MARLIN FISHING
NOT STOPPED BY
THE WAR DANGER
Fleet Of Vessels Has Been Giv
en Clearance By Order Uni
ted States Navy
FLEET TO BE SMALLER
THAN IN PAST YEARS
There’s a Marlin fishing fleet be
ing assembled at Ocean City, Md., in
preparation for the coming season.
The resort has been given a clearance
Order by the United States Navy in
! commercial and sports fishing in
Maryland waters. Perhaps it would
be a good idea to put a gun or two
on these boats and let ’em go fishing;
for subs.
Commercial fishermen, predicting
record catches, are placing their ocean
pound nets in position for the hauls
between March and November.
The marlin fishing fleet, usually
thirty-five cruisers, will be smaller
(Continued on page 10)
COUNTY ICHOOL TEACHER
JOINS COUNTRY’S SERVICE
Mr. George Ewell Dryden, 48-year
old World War veteran and principal
of the Stockton High School for the
past 18 years, is today with the Uni
ted States Navy again.
Mr. Dryden resigned his post as
school principal, as president of the
Stockton Fire Department and as
commander of Worcester Post No.
93, American Legion unit of Pocomo
ke City. He is now with the Naval
Supply contingent.
He served in the World War as a
lieutenant, Sr. Grade, in the United
States Navy
COMMITTEES FOR
SALVAGE ARE
ANNOUNCED
F. VV. C. Webb, Esq., Of Salis
bury. Appointed Chairman Of
' The Eastern Shore Region
The chairmen of the Salvage Com
mittees for the nine Eastern Shore
’ Counties in the ‘‘Salvage for Victory”
' program were announced by H. Find
lay French, Chairman of the Mary
land State Salvage Committee of the
Maryland Council of Defense ,at a
meeting held Thursday evening, March
sth, at Easton, Maryland.
Frederick W. C. Webb of Salisbury,
is Chairman of the Eastern Shore Re
gon. The sub chairmen named for
Worcester and Somerset counties are
as follows: John S. Whaley, Snow
Hill, Maryland, for Worcester Coun
ty; and Frank M. Layfield, Princess
Anne, Maryland, for Somerset Coun
ty.
Mr. French explained that although
various salvage activities have been
started by the Boy Scouts, U. S. D. A.
War Boards, including the County
(Continued on Page 4)
CALVIN DONAWAY IS
BURIED HERE THURSDAY
Funeral services for Calvin Dona
way, 42, were held yesterday, Thurs
day, from the home of his brother,
Walter L. Donaway, Rev. John A.
Ditto officiating; interment in the
cemetery of Salem Methodist Church.
Mr. Donaway died in Cambridge,
Md., at the age of 42 years. He was
born in Whalevville, Md., and moved
to Pocomoke in 1908.
He is survived by three brothers
and two sisters: Walter L., of Poco
moke City; Thomas H., of Powellville;
Burton, of Berlin; George F., of New
port News; Mrs. Jennie Hickman, of
Pocomoke; and Mrs. Isaac Wootten,
of Salisbury.
The pall bearers at the funeral were
: members of the fellowship class of
the Baptist Church, conducted by Dr.
J. T. Nock: B. F. Moore, Willis Hall,
C. T. Howard, C. K. Howard, Vaughn
Wilkinson, and D. K. Hancock.

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