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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, March 13, 1942, Image 7

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Friday. March 13, 1942
Boyhood Recollections
0!
The Five Churches Of Pocomoke
City
By EBEN IIEAKN E
Chapter Six
Salem Methodist Church
Notwithstanding the fact that I
have entitled my series of articles on
Pocomoke City’s five churches, “Boy
hood Recollections,” yet 1 have con
sidered it advisable to include some
outstanding facts connected with the
beginnings or early history ot the re
spective churches.
Tradition says that a Mr. Reville
suggested about 1785 that this town t
be given the name of Newtown. It
was therefore known by this name
until the year 1878, when by an Act
of the Maryland State Legislature,
its name was changed to Pocomoke
City. Methodism probably had its
beginnings here some time during
the latter part of the 17th century. Be
fore the founding fathers of Metho
dism were able to build a church, so
cieties were formed and religious ser
vices were held in private homes.
Preaching apopintments were at Lev
in Long’s house (in Henderson’s
Neck) about a mile from the present
town limits, at Wm. Melvin’s (father
of Rev. Avra Melvin) on Market |
Street extended, where the Pocomoke
Inn -now stands, and at Capt. James
Fumiss’ on Front Street on the site
of the present home of Miss Maude
Berry.
The first Methodist Church in New
town was built in ISOS. It occupied
the site of the present Salem c hurch
at the south-west corner of the pres
ent 2nd and Walnut Streets. It faced
on 2nd Street, which at that time was
known as Cedar Hall Road. It was
in the suburbs of the little village
and probably partially surrounded
by a pine thicket. The church was a j
small frame building only 30 x 32 j
feet in dimensions. It had three doors, j
two. in front and one at the side lead
ing out into the graveyard which
surounded the church. The church
had three galleries, two side and one
end gallery. It was neither lathered
nor plastered for 30 years. In its
erection, some gave lumber, some
work and some money. The Act of
Incorporation was signed on March
17, 1834, twenty five years after the
church was built. A Board of Trus
tees was elected under the name, style
and title of the “The Trustees of the
Methodist Episcopal Salem Chapel in
Newtown.” At that time the trustees
were John, Thomas and Josiah Long,
Jesse Powell, Thomas Maddox. John
Williams and Justus M. Bratten. It
is interesting to me to know that Jo
siah Long was my great-grandfather
on my mother’s side and John Wil
liams was ,my great-great uncle on
my father’s side. For many years, the
ground around the church was the on
ly cemetery in the town and it was
a general burying ground for the in
habitants of the little village, regard
less of religious belief. The church
of my boyhood, the successor of the
1808 church, which had been in ex
istence for 47 years, was built in 1855
during the pastorate of Rev. John F. j
Chaplain. Of course, I do not remem
ber him but my parents informed me
when I was old enough to comprehend
that Mr. Chaplain baptized me on
Jan. 3, 1856, at which time I was less
than fourteen months old. The Church
Records for that year also corrobo
rate that statement. The 1855 church
was a frame building 30 by 46 feet, i
It contained one gallery and was sur
mounted by a spire in which hung a
bell. The gallery was constructed to
accommodate colored folks who at that
period had no church of their owp.
In my boyhood, I have heard colored
people while they stood in the gallery,
relate their religious experiences dur
ing the Love Feasts that were held
previous to the sermon period at the
Quarterly Meting occasions, and I al
so have seen them march down from
the gallery and pass down the aisle
to the altar and partake of the Holy
Communion after it had been admin
istered to the white people of the
congregation. In later years after a
Cabinet Organ had been introduced,
the gallery was occupied by the choir
of the church. However, in my child
hood days, there was no choir but
there was congregational singing.
The leader of the singing was the
late Mr. Littleton T. Clarke. He was
capable and efficient and with my
mind’s eye, I can see him now’ stand
ing in his acustomed pew leading the
congregation in singing the stirring
and treasured hymns of Methodism,
to the tunes our mothers sang to us
when putting us to sleep w’hen we
were infants. Mr. Clarke was the
father of our fellow townsman, Mr.
Edward J. Clarke, the present editor
of our local paper “The Worcester
Democrat.” Mr. L. T. Clarke led the
singing from my earliest recollection
until his death, which occurred in
1866 at the early age of 37 years.
How greatly he was missed by the t
congregation of Salem after he passed
aWa> .
In the late 1860’s. during the pas
torate of Rev. Thomas K. Mart indale,
a cabinet reed organ was installed in
tin* church. About that time, the
late Lieut. James H. Vincent, hav
ing settled in Newtown, joined Salem
Church and organized a choir. He be
came its leader and filled that posi
tion in the church for over fifty years.
! Four generations of his family be
! ginning with himself have been con
nected with Salem choir from 1868;
I to the present time—a record per
haps unparalled in any church in this
section—a period covering over sev
enty years. The first organist of the
church was my oldest sister, the late
Miss Mary M. Hearne from 1868 to
her death in 1875. I was a member
of the choir over thirty years. I be- |
gan to attend Sunday School at a very
early ago and was appointed as the
i teacher of a class of boys while still
in my teens. I am one boy that did j
not outgrow the Sunday School but
; I have attended it all through my life
! time. The Sunday School Superinten
-1 dents during the 1860’s were the late
I Thomas J. Blaine and I)r. Samuel
I S. Quinn. During those years and for
many afterwards and many years be
; fore, the Class Meeting was one of
■ the deeply spiritual institutions of the
Methodist Church and it held many
a follower of Christ steadfast to his
religious duty, but sad to relate the
innovations of the 20th Century have
| modernized the church to such an ex
tent that this powerful Wesleyan in
| stitution has almost been obliterated
ifrem the general church calendar.
In my boyhood, children, regardless
!of ago. accompanied their parents to
the preaching services of the church
and sat with them during the deli\
ery of the sermon thus emphasizing
the spirit of worship. 1 regret that
! this custom is not strictly followed
iat the present day. St. Paul surely
j had this custom in mind when he
wrote in Hebrews 10-25. “Not for
| getting the assembling of ourselves
! together as the manner of some is;
but exhorting one another and so
j much the more as ye see the day ap
! proaching.” The pastors of Salem in
my boyhood that I remember so well
were Revs. Wm. Merrill, Thomas
Newman, N. M. Bennum, Edward G.
Irwin, John W. Pierson, Thomas E.
Martindale and George D. Watson.
During a great part of the 1860’s
Newtown Circuit included eight chur-
Iches or appointments as follows: —
I Salem in Newtown, Sandy Hill (now
Stockton), Goodwill, (near Davis’
Cross Roads), Swanscute (now Rem-
I son’s), Cokesbury, Williams’, Hol
land’s and Furnace. The first four
j named above are located south east
of the Pocomoke River, and the sec
ond four northwest of the Pocomoke
River. To properly accomplish the
work, two pastors were required. The
Junior ministers I remember were
Revs. Chas. H. McDermond, Wm. T.
Tull, Thos. B. Killiam, George S. Con
away and Albert Jump. The Presiding
Elders (now called Dist. Supts.) were
Henry Colclazer, Adam Wallace Sol
omon, M. Cooper and Vaughan Smith.
There was a retired minister, Rev.
William Quinn, of the Philadelphia
Conference, who resided here dur
ing my childhood. His home occupied
the site of the present home of Mr.
Raymond C. Dryden on Market St.,
extended. He was the father of the
late Dr. Sam‘l S. Quinn and the great
grandfather of Mr. Lorie C. Quinn,
Sr., of Crisfield, Md. The local prea
cher of the circuit of Newtown dur
ing the 1860’s were Revs. James Mur
ray, George W. Covington, James Mil
ler and Joseph J. Devereaux. Rev.
John D. Long, Sr., while a native of
this locality did not reside here dur
ing the 1860’s. He was licensed to
preach by 4 Salem Church Quarterly
Conference. He joined the Philadel
phia Conference in 1839. When he re
tired in the 1880’s, he returned to this
town and resided here until his death
I
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LEE ST. & PA. R. R. off So. Division St. Phone 2112, Salisbury,Md.
SPECIALIZING IN LIQUIDATION & DISMANTLING OF PLANTS
in 1891. During his retirement in the
1850’s, he wrote and published a book
entitled “Pictures of Slavery in
('hurt’ll and State.” Rev. James Mur
ray after he was fifty years old joined
tin* Virginia Conference, where he
labored several years. \\ hen he re
tired in 1875. he returned to Newtown
and ho wrote and published a book in
1883 entitled “A History of New
town." He died in 1886. The six last
named ministers were a valuable as
sistance to the churches all during
their residence in this town in looking
after the spiritual interests of the
work during the enforced absence
of the pastors and on local Sundays
and at prayer meetings. Rev. Vaughn
Smith has a daughter residing at
present in Pocomoke City and a mem
ber of Salem Church, Mrs. Benjamin
F. Harrington, of Second Street.
Rev. Adam Wallace wrote a history
in the 1860’s of Rev. Joshua Thomas
of Deals Island, entitled, “The Parson
of the Islands.” Mrs. George Mat
thews and Mrs. Howard Covington,
who are at present residents of our
town are the great-granddaughters
of Rev. Joshua Thomas.
Some of the heads of families that
were members of Salem Methodist
Church of whom I have a vivid mem
ory during the lS6o’s were Thomas
J. Blaine, Thomas N. Williams, .John
H. and Littleton I’. Claiko, Edward
T. Ardis, James S. Primrose, Char
les W. B. Marshall, Janies W. and
Moses Payne, James and Thomas
Henderson, Sam’l S., John W. and
-
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j
USE CHEVUUErS
“TRUCK CONSERVATION PLAN*
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„\C \ira Of JV^
18® "TRANSPORTATION IS H \3fl| ,tio ■••Tsfc about the Budget Plan. B
s ■ VITAL TO VICTORY" B P"“ don P a^n( s and easy |
i vimb ivr viwiwri Wffmx on parts and service. ■
NL® STAMPS
DUNCAN BROS.
Pocomoke City, Md.
i _. i
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT, POCOMOKE CITY. MARYLAND
Wm. W. Quinn, Woods Richardson.
Ralph Russ, Wm. Anderson, Henry
Murray, Ambrose Dixon, .las. 11. Vin
cent. Sharp Fallow. Robert 11. and
.lame. W. dayman. Win. < . Roane
\ 1 11 e. Wm. I' - . Jones, Win. S. Mathews,
John I ticket>on and Deput y. The
Real Estate holdings of Salem < hureli
will he described in a later chapter.
Accomac News
Too late for last issue
Mr. Wesley Bur ford of Camp Geo.
G. Meade, Md., spent the week-end
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. .J. I.
Burford.
Mrs. Martha Shields and Mrs.
Amelia Powell left Monday to spend
some time in Newport News with Mr.
and Mrs. Berryman Scott.
Mr. R. B. Steinmetz of Washing
ton, I). C., spent the week-end with
his family here.
Mr. Sam Northam spent the week
end in Greensboro, Maryland, with
friends.
Mr. Beverly Fletcher spent last
week-end in Englewood, New Jersey
with relatives.
Mrs. E. Aimer Ames, Ji.. spent sev
eral days last week in Norfolk.
Mr. W. S. Johnson of Washington,
I). C. spent several days last week
with his sister, Mrs. T. H. Melson and
Mr. Melson.
Mrs. J. H. Fletcher and Mrs. Jen
nie Hall are spending some time with
Mrs. L. C. M. Smythe in Charleston.
S. (\
Rev. R. W. Kirkpatrick spent sev-j
oral days in Trenton. N. J. last week.
Mr. Walter Milliner ol Kdgewoodj
\rsenal spmit the week end with his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Milliner.
Miss Grace Mason of Virginia
Beach, Miss Hattie White of Belle!
Haven and Mr. Karl Duvall of Lang
ie\ Field spent the week-end in the,
home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred B. Mason.
Mr. John D. Grant, Jrd and Mr.
Wilson S. Grant of Suffolk spent the.
week-end with their mother, Mrs.
John D. Grant, Jr. They were accom
panied home on Sunday by Mrs. Wil
son S. Grant, who had spent several
days with relatives in Accomac and
Parks ley.
Mrs. A. Preston Wessells and Miss!
Lillian Wessells spent Friday ill j
Richmond.
Mr. Leo Shamie spent the first of
the week in New York City with ret- I
atives.
Mr. Malcolm Baldwin of Spring-j
field. New Jersey, is spending several I
days in the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Joe White.
Mrs. Stewart Wessells of Pocomoke
spent the first of the week with her;
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Barnes,
near Greenbush.
Mrs. W. T. Bond returned home
ill's week after spending a month
with her daughter Mrs. Tracey Gar
diner and Mi. Gardiner.
Mr. William Eichelberger spent
several days this week with his fath
er. Mr. Walker Eichelberger.
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Page 7

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