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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, April 24, 1942, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1942-04-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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UNITED STATES
' DEFENSE *
BONDS
AND
STAMPS
H|l'
A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT EST, 1898
THELEDGER-ENTERPRISKEST 1880
“Chirps'’^*
from the
Democrat’s Pen
Well, Sir, did any of you people
ever hear persons expressing deep re
gret that they were “born a genera
tion too soon?” If you did, you, of
course, know they were bewailing the
fact that the years had so piled them
selves on their backs, they were un
able to enjoy the delights of the pres
eut day, which delights seemed far
more intensive than those of last cen
tury*—the days of the 80’s and 90’s.
But, I’m here to tell you those old
days had something to recommend
them also. In proof of that, one of
my good friends brought me a bill of
items purchased back in the 50’s—
-1861, to be exact, and as I read it, it
made, even me, sigh for the good old
days.
The first item on this bill—dated
November 18, 1851, almost a century
ago—“3s gallons of whiskey at 25
cents a gallon”, amounting to $8.75.
Boy, O Boy! Why I paid—l mean I
was with a man not long ago who, I
saw, paid 50c for one little drink, a
bout two fingers. He had to buy an
other one in order to make it feel fa
miliar to his throat.
But, “25 cents a gallon!” Wonder
wbat sort of “pizen” that was. I
reckon it had the kick of a mule, the
explosive strength of TNT, the ex
hilaration of a plane flight, and cal
culated to “lay you by” for, at least,
48 hours after taking. But, doesn’t
that price sound alluring? Why,
when you went to the place where
that was sold, the merchant must
have handed out a dipper, pointed to
a barrel, and told the purchaser to
help himself, collecting 25 cents per
dipper, making money at the price be_
cause he knew the drinker would be
snoozing under a haystack long be
fore swallowing eight pints. Just
think, how 25 cents against about sls
make the old times glow with entranc
ing splendor.
There was still another item on that
aged and infirm bill: “One barrel of
Hour, $4.25”. Just think of the pan
cakes, doughnuts, fluffy rolls, angel
cake, short cake, ash cake, and a
thousand other things you could make
“back in the old days”, out of a bar
rel of flour! Now-a-days you’d have
to shell out about $12.00 for the
wheat product. Back in those day,
tho’, “Old Dobbin” carried the wheat
to the mill; the miller took his toll,
gTound the rest up for you, and you
went home happy. Compare the old
water-turned wheel to the oil-burning
engine of today; compare the old
mill-house on the dam side with the
buildings in Pocomoke, and you have
the answer.
We come to another very interest
ing record: “500 segars, $1.62%.”
Caluculate, you mathematicians, just
bow much that would be per “seegar”
—just a fraction of one-third of a
cent. Can you imagine the effluvia
arising from the weed that went into
the manufacture of one of those
smokes? Why, in about five min
utes your head plus your stomach
would be on the bum. Just one good
effect of those would be to make a
man swear off forever and a day. I
don’t know whether these would make I
you sigh for the good old days or not. s
Maybe, one of Cuba’s best is more at
tractive.
These farmers’ wives ought to be
asnamed of themselves collecting 40
cents per pound for butter. Back
there in the “good old days”, 14 cents
was a standard price. And it was
good butter, too. No oleomargarine,
in those pats of cow product. On the
bill I have before me, 98 pounds of
butter sold for $13.72. Just think of
the pleasure of eating buckwheat
cakes, soaked in butter at that price.
I eat a dozen now; no telling how*
many with 14-cent butter. The only
drawback would be a possible indiges.
tion.
Here’s another item which makes
you look back toward the old time
and weep: “98 pounds of bacon at 12 j
cents a pound!” You know, I believe
it would taste better at that price,
don’t you? Now-a-days, these store
keepers make you pay 30 cents for
it. That’s enough to make the pig
squeal if it were alive; it being dead,
we do the squealing. But it’s no
use. The price stays put.
Again, think of this: “114 pounds
of cheese at 8 cents a pound!” That
explains the popularity of cheese and
crackers as a lunch—good one, too —
in the days of “ye olde time.” Some j
people preferred one of the big old,
(Continued on Page 8) j!
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT
45 SURVEYORS
ARE ENCAMPED
j NEAR HERE
These Surveys Are 100%, At
Present And For Duration
For The Armed Forces
MELT. G. VV. LOVESEE
IS CHIEF OF THE SURVEY
A field party of the U. S. Coast
and Geodetic Survey is camped at the
Y on highway 113 just east of Poco
moke City. About 45 surveyors,
' many with their wives and children
' are living in tents and trailers there.
I They moved there from Cambridge
and have been arriving since the 21st
* of April. They will remain about
two weeks to establish latitude and
1 longitude stations in this vicinity.
Their surveys at present and for
the duration are 100% for the armed
forces. However, the marks are per
manent and will be just as valuable
in peace time for the local federal,
state, and municipal surveyors. These
i marks are used as a starting point
for detailed surveys. The marks are
from 5 to 10 miles apart. To locate
them it is necessary to build steel
towers from 50 to 125 feet in height.
These towers serve as a tripod for
the surveying instruments and can be
built in one day by a crew of 5 to 6
men. They remain standing about a
week and then are dismantled and
(Continued on Page 8)
LOCAL WOMAN’S CLUB
TO HOLD GARDEN PARTY
The Woman’s Club of Pocomoke
will hold its annual Garden Party
Friday, May Ist at the Winter Quar
ters Club House, at two o’clock in
the afternoon.
Games, including bridge, 500, rook
and Chinese checkers, will be played
and arrangements will be made to
entertain any size party,
i Other entertainment has also been
| planned and door prizes will be given.
The price of admission is 30c per
person. Those wishing to make re
servation do so at once by calling
the chairman, Mrs. Clarence E. Dun
can, telephone 160.
DR. LLEWELYN
IS COMMISSIONED
IN MEDICAL CORPS
|
Governor O’Conor Has Issued
Commissions To Thirty Of
ficers In Guard
Completing the commissioning oft
| officers held in abeyance until the
survey of the State Guard by the l
War Department was finished, Gover
nor Herbert R. O'Conor has issued
I commissions to thirty officers. All
| of the commissions were recommend
ed through the usual military chan
nels. Thirteen of the commissions
i were original ones and the remain
j ing seventeen were permanent com
i missions, in each case a probationary
period having expired with satisfac-!
tory showing by the officers.
It had been requested of the Gov
ernor that further commissions not
be signed while the War Department
survey was underway. The survey
when completed showed the State
Guard to be of unusually high stand
i ing, and the Army officers making
the survey complimented the Guard
on its training, proficiency and handl
(Continued on Page 8)
SALEM METHODISTS ARE
URGED TO ATTEND SUNDAY
The members of Salem Methodist
Church are urged to be present at
the morning service Sunday.
The pastor will preach on “The
Building Church” and he wants his
members to hear it.
In the evening the Methodist Youth
will meet at 6:i5 and at 7:30 Rev.,;
Wootten will be the guest speaker at! i
Bethany. N | 1
5c THt
copy
————————————
The Pledge lo IPemaeravg ~. Slave Van Signed Vaunt?

pledge for regular investment in
DEFENSE SAVINGS BONDS
NOTE—This is not an order form. The Signer will buv Defense Savings Bonds
by one of the methods listed below: ©s*l*il]VAL
To aid the National Defense, I pledge that Sena to Treararr Dept.
1 6 ’ (CONFIDENTIAL)
I will invest the sum of $ in Defense Savings Bonds (or Stamps) each ii —i
I will buy these Bonds: Jj=j *^ lth
0 Prom a poet office, bank, or other ales h
O By mail from the Treasurer of the United States, Washington, D. C.
Q Under a Pay-RoJ! Savings Plan (or other similar arrangement for regular purrhaMng/ in ,f - vou ar * al*dy Pe
. effect at my place of employment: chasing Defense Bonds
systematically, please
'—l indicate the type of
0 Through a regular purchase plan installed by the following organization: .’’fta^heck
,. , here. Q
(>•■* 4 aiuicMksi * (Adinmj '
I will faithfully fulfill this pledge for the duration of the War or so long as I am financially able to do so.
BUY (Oilm mamm) (Middle vmu.l flaw omr
(SttMand (dtV) '(Smi j
(Name of Organization and Agent Securing Pledge) bTfTs. lis
*■ wtnirtit Mtima* mm 10—3R878-1

NEW PLEDGE CARD FOR BONDS AND STAMPS: Above is a facsimile of a pledge card, calling
for the systematic purchase of Defense jßonds and Stamps, which every American citizen is now being
asked to sign. The country must have billions of dollars tr carry on the war. When you are approached
be stits you sign one of these pledge cards for as much as you possibly can 1
MISS LOUISE McKINNEY’S
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
I
The following announcement con
tained in a Springfield, Ohio, paper
twill be of interest to Pocomoke peo
, Pie:
Attorney and Mrs. Otho McKinney
are announcing the engagement of
their daughter, Anna Louise, to Dr.
( Charles Hilton Turner, son of Mrs.
Chauncey Turner. Miss McKinney
was prominent in social activities at
; Muskingum College, from which she
I was graduated in 1941, and was chos
en homecoming queen during her
sophomore year. She is now a mem
ber of the Greensburg High School
faculty.
Mr. Turner received his degree in
optometry from the Northern Illinois
School of Optometry in 1941 and is
now associated as staff sergeant with
the medical detachment of the Army.
No definite date has been set for the
wedding.
Mrs. Chauncey Turner was the for
mer Miss Lucille Young of this city
and the late Mr. Turner was also a
resident of Pocomoke for a number
of years.
JUNIOR LEAGUE^
! OF CITY HEBREWS
HOSTS SUNDAY, 19
The Guest Speaker For The
Evening Was Kabbi Stephen
Sherman. Of Salisbury
The Junior League of the Poco
moke Hebrew Congregation entertain
ed aproximately SO guests at a Vic
tory Dinner, on Sunday, April 19th,
at the Pocomoke Synagogue. Those
present were guests from Pocomoke i
City, Princess Anne, Crisfield, Snow
Hill, Salisbury and Exmore. Also in-j
eluded among the guests were 13 sol- j
diers from Westover Camp, includ- j
ing Father Horn. Chaplain. Father
Horn gave an interesting talk con-1
I ceming the morale of citizens on the
home front, and called on every citi
zen at home to write letters more of
ten to their loved ones in the fight
ing forces.
The guest speaker lor the evening
(Continued on Page 5)
CORPORAL C. H. PRUITT
ILL IN ALASKA HOSPITAL
Corporal Clifton Howard Pruitt, j
son of Mr. and Mrs. John E. Pruitt, j
of Greenbackville, Va., stationed at I
Umnak Island. Alaska, in a letter to j
his parents this week, told them that
he is ill in a hospital there.
The extent of his illness is not
known but his many friends hope it j
is slight.
Corporal Pruitt has had five years j;
service in the U. S. Army and was |
transferred to the West Coast the i
first of this year.
AND
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
POCOMOKE CITY, MD„ FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 1942
SERVICE BOARD
IS NOW READY
j FOR 4TH DRAFT
Prof. Verlin C. Krabill And
Henry P. Walters, Esq., Are
Pocomoke Registrars
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
REGISTRATION DAYS
,|
The local Selective Service Board
announced on Tuesday that all was in
j readiness for the Fourth Registration
under the Selective Service Law,
which will be held in Worcester Coun
ty on Sunday, April 26th and Monday,
April 27th. This registration, as was
, the last one, is conducted under the
! supervision of the Chairman of the
Local Board, who is Chief Registrar,
and is assisted by numerous assistant
chief registrars and registrars. The
assistant chief registrars appointed
for the coming registration at the
several places are as follows:
j Pocomoke City: Messrs. Verlin C.
Krabill and Henry P. Walters.
Bishopville: Miss Elizabeth Bishop
and Mr. Harry R. Ringler.
Ocean City: Messrs. Elwood B,
Mason and John P. Whaley.
Berlin: Messrs. John L. Sanford,
Jr., and Harold B. Scarborough.
Newark: Miss Lottie Holston and
, Mr. Sidney E. Collins.
Snow Hill: Messrs. Ben T. Truitt
(Continued on Page 5)
BOARD ALLOWS
THE COUNTY 96
TIRES; 89 TUBES
Besides These, Forty Retreads,
Are Awarded. Of These
Pocomoke Gets Share
Trucks Ti Tu
!C. R. Turner, Berlin 11 j
,H. E. Hall, Berlin, 2 2
H. E. Bradford, Berlin 1 1 1
J. W. Strader, Berlin 2 0
R. F. Powell, Berlin 3 3
S. W. Murray, Berlin 2 2 j
R. J. Davis, Berlin 4 0
H. Littleton, Berlin 11
R. F. Powell, Berlin 5 5
S. Palmer, Berlin 11
Harrison Nurseries, Berlin 2 2
G. T. Nock, Berlin 11
W. L. Bunting, Bishop 2 1
J. A. Latchum, Bishop 0 2
E. Bunting, Bishop 11
H. E. Brasure, Bishop 2 2
J. H. Bunting, Showed 11
E. Hastings, O. City 2 2
D. C. Harmon, O. City 11 j
D. P. Bishop, O. City 11
J. E. Devereaux, Snow Hill 2 2
P. W. Dryden, Snow Hill 11
Farmers Supply Co. S. Hill 2 2 j
C. M. Hudson, Snow Hill 2 2
(Continued on Page 8) . (
CORPORAL BOUNDS TAKES
MISS RICKHARD FOR BRIDE
A military wedding, of interest
* j here, took place at noon Saturday,
' April eighteenth when Miss Margaret
Rickhard and Corp James W. Bounds,
of Laurel, Del., formerly of Pocomoke
j! City, were united in marriage.
The ceremony was performed in the
Episcopal Church at Laurel by the
Rev. H. V. Clary, rector of St. Mary’s
j Church, Pocomoke City.
j
The groom is the son of Mrs. Jas.
> W. Bounds, and the late Mr. Bounds,
former residents of this city. He is
j at present in the Marine Corps, sta
j' tioned at Lewes, Del.
i 1 Those from here who attended the
, wedding and also the reception which
- followed at the home of the groom’s
~ mother were: Mr. and Mrs. Clarence
s E. Robertson, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. Clar
; I ence E. Robertson, Jr., Mr. and Mrs.
3 George Twilley, Mrs. R. Harlan Rob
, ertson, Rev. and Mrs. H. V. Clary and
t son. *
i B. G. TURLINGTON
DIED ON SUNDAY
1 AT HIS RESIDENCE
Funeral Services Were Held
From The Remson Methodist
I Church, Tuesday P. M.
Beverly G. Turlington died Sunday i
evening at his home in Welbournei
after a lingering illness of a few
years. He was born near Modest!
Town, Accomack County in 1892, and
is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Wil-!
liam Turlington. In 1396 his parents I
moved with their family to Welbourne i
where they have been actively engag- 1
| ed in farming ever since.
Mr. Turlington was known for his
kindly nature, greeting his visitors
■ one and all with a smile, even a few
hours before his passing.
Funeral [services were held from
the Remson Methodist Church of '
which he was a member, at three
o’clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted 1
by the Rev. John H. Whedbee. In
(Continued on Page 5)
MISS KILMON BRIDE OF
PRIVATE EDWIN CROSSE;
c
Mr. George L. Kilmon announces I
the marriage of his daughter, Mar
garet Frances Kilmon, of Pocomoke 1
City, to Pvt. Edwin Crosse, of Me- c
Kanda, Illinois, which took place Sat- i
urday evening, April 18th at 5 o’clock i
at the Baptist parsonage, the Rev. !
John A. Ditto officiating. fc
The bride was attractively attired
in a traveling suit of copen blue, with 1<
accessories to match. Her bouquet
was gardenias. I
Immediately following the cere- n
| mony a reception was held at the
bride’s home. They will reside in Po- n
comoke for the present. ' ii
NEWS AND PICTURE SERVICE
$1.50 y TA
OYSTER ROAST
FOR THE SOLDIERS
BY ROTARIANS
Local C lub Also Went To Cris
field Wednesday Evening For
The Inter-City Meeting
The soldier boys, quartered in the
local Armory, were treated to an oys- j
ter roast by the local Rotary Club ,
on Monday evening last. The feast
* a -taged at the canning establish
ment of Mason and Company, and
was most successfully carried out.
The Pennsylvania natives may have
had some difficulty in getting inside
the bivalves, but with the help of the
Sho’ denizens, everybody was satis
fied and pleased.
The local Rotarians joined Princess
Anne and Crisfield in an inter-city
meeting on Wednesday evening last,
(Continued on Page 8)
MISS MARTHA A. HALL
WEDS MR. 0. G. PUSEY
A pretty but quiet wedding was
1 ! solemnized Saturday evening last
j when Miss Martha Anne Hall, daugh
’ ter of Mrs. Minnie G. Hall of this
city and the late Samuel F. Hall, be
came the bride of Mr. Otis Graf
ton Pusey, formerly of Salisbury.
The ceremony was performed at the
home of Rev. Elmer Pryor, in Poco
moke. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Johnson
were the only attendants.
The bride wore navy with match
ing accessories and a corsage of car
nations and pink rose buds.
Mr. and Mrs. Pusey have return
ed from a brief honeymoon ar.d are
making their home in Pocomoke
where the groom is employed by the
Worcester Fertilizer Company.
AMERICANILEGION
AUXILIARY MET
ON TUESDAY LAST
Program Following Business
Meeting Under Direction Of
Mrs. Grady E. Powell
The regular meeting of the Amer
ican Legion Auxiliary was held Tues
day evening at 8 o'clock in the Mu
nicipal Building.
Mrs. Roy Mason, president, pre
-1 sided at the business meeting and the
program which followed was under
the chairmanship of Mrs. Grady Pow
ell. Mrs. Powell presented the sub
ject “Patriotism” followed by group
i singing of America.
Mr. John Row entertained with
! three songs which were popular dur- 1
■ ing the first World War “Keep the
Home Fires Burning,” "Long, Long j
j Trail”, and “Till We Meet Again”
| and a group of songs which are pop- j
ular during the present war “Pll Re
! member When”, “I’ll Pray For You,’)
! and "The White Cliffs of Dover.” He
was accompanied by Mrs. Anna G. ’
McClure.
Miss Peggy Renninger also enter- 1
tained with a reading “Lincoln’s Get
tysburg Address.” The program was
brought to a close by the singing of
“Star Spangled Banner.”
TUBERCULOSIS CUNICS
FOR MONTH OF MAY
The tuberculosis clinic for Worces
ter County will be held on May 11,
1942 at 10:00 A. M. This month the
clinic will take place at Health De
partment Office in Snow Hill.
This is one of the clinics that are ! 1
held every month in all the counties 1
of Maryland by the Maryland Tuber- :
culosis Association. All of these clin- 1
ics are free. ■
Dr. Paul Cohen, the clinician, will
be in charge of the examinations. 1
Other clinics will be held as fol- i
lows: 1
Princess Anne, May 12, County c
Health Office, at 10 o’clock in the i i
morning. 1
Salisbury, May 15, Health Depart- i
inent Office, Court House, at 9 o’clock t
in the morning. i
■rrrpv
UNITED STATES
DEFENSE
BONDS
AND
STAMPS
9l|l'-
VOLUME 62 NO. 17
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
TO CLOSE WEEK
MAY ELEVENTH
Names Of Prospective Grad
uates And The Dates For
C ommencements Given
POCOMOKE HIGH HAS
43 THAI WILL GRADUATE
The public schools of Worcester
i County will close on Monday, May 11,
1942, and commencements will be held
as follows: Pocomoke City, May 11;
; i Snow Hill, May 11; Berlin, May 11;
, Stockton, May 8; and Ocean City, May
’ 8.
The prospective graduates in the
high schools are as follows:
; POCOMOKE HIGH SCHOOL,
Academic: John H. Clarke, Jr., Verlin
’ Arnold Krabill, John Richard Rew,
4th, John Teagle Smullin, 3rd, Ruth
Parks Callahan, Lydia Elizabeth Den
ston, Ida Louise East, Betty Rae
Leister, Winifred Frances Townsend,
r Phyllis Shaw Vincent, Elizabeth Ann
Wootten.
Commercial: Martin King Cole,
i Frederick Charles Hill, Madge Leigh
t Bailey, Iva Jane Denston, Winifred
■ Elizabeth Ennis, Emma Lee Howard,
> Margaret Lee Linton, Margaret Jean
• Littleton, Mary Beatrice Morse, Mil
■ dred Louise Niblett, Mark Katherine
Schoolfield, Mary Francis Scott,
! Catherine Mae Smack, Juanita Stur
(Continued on Page 8)
i
EMPLOYMENT COMMISSION
TO GIVE TESTS FOR JOB
’ | At a date to be announced later,
' | a test will be given by the State Em
: ployment Commission to applicants
for a position, the duties of which
are to operate and maintain a power
operated drawbridge, and to perform
related work as required. The salary
i will be $720 per annum, and applica
-1 tions must be in by April 30.
; The test is open to all counties on
1 ! the Eastern Shore and to Anne Arun
| del and Harford on the Western
I Shore. Additional information and
. blanks can be obtained from State
’ Employment Commissioner, 22 Light
j Street Baltimore, Md.
FAL STUDENTS
OF THE SCHOOLS
LISTFD MAY 1
Hours Of Registration Will Be
From 9 A. M., To 3 P. M.,
With One Hour At Noon
.
May Ist will be Registration Day
at the Elementary School for all chil
dren who will enter school in Sep
tember for the first time. The hours
iof registration will be from 9 A. M.
: to 12 noon and 1 P. M. to 3:30 P. M.
All parents are urged to bring their
i children to register on that day, as
after the registration the children
will be taken over to the Health Cen
! ter and be given a Medical Examina
tion, by Dr. Louis G. Llewelyn and
his staff, free of charge, and whatever
physical defects are found will be re
(Continued on Page 8)
IMPROVEMENT TO THE
FLOOR OF DRAW BRIDGE
A much needed improvement is be
ing made in the draw bridge over the
Pocomoke river at this city.
The old plank floor is being re
moved and one of steel is taking its
place. This, more than anything else,
resembles lattice work, with oblong
openings measuring about 2 inches
square and the depth is 5 inches.
It was thought at first by many
that these squares were to be filled
in by concrete or some other mixture,
but a representative of the “Demo
crat” was informed they would re
main open. This covering seems to
be what is needed for a lasting floor,
and the noise of rattling boards as
traffic passes to and fro, will become
a thing of the past.

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