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Worcester Democrat and the ledger-enterprise. (Pocomoke City, Md.) 1921-1953, October 09, 1942, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060127/1942-10-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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A DEMOCRATIC NEWSPAPER
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT EST. 1898
THE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE E9T 188 C
“Chirps^f^
from the
Democrat s Pen
Well. Sir. 1 hope the way those
Yanks got yanked off their base ball
feet by that St. Louis “Gas House
Gang”, contains nothing of a lore
boding nature, but it sounds ominous
to me. Yankees don't often get beat.
Over there in Solomon’s Island, the
Japs get called down by the Marines |
whenever these little brown men yet
restless and want to go somewhere.
The Yankees tell ’em to stay where
they’re at, or alse. But I don t be
lieve the boys in Uncle Sam’s uni-1
form are going to lie down and be
walked over like those Yanks in the |
uniform of the American League base ■
ball club.
Blest if I don’t believe those ball ;
tossers ought to adopt the name of
the Brooklyn team: “Dem Bums.”
How-some-ever, I’ll bet some of them
will be yanked out of the line-up be
fore the next season rolls around, if
the war will allow a season even to
roll around. You know, I’ve had bad
luck lately. Last September my fa
vorite in politics lost out; last Sat
urday, the football team I generally
put my money on (not much tho’)
Notre Dame, lost out; and now the
Yanks go and let me down hard; —
all by close scores, but “close” doesn’t
count; you can’t bring home the ba
con by “close”; that’s not a pay-off
word.
You know, I think some of those
Yanks could wield a gun better than
they can a base ball bat, if one is to (
be judged by the way any effective
hitting was in evidence during the
series. Uncle Sam, I think could
make better grenade hurlers out of
them than team managers and coach
es can turn them into ball tossers.
But isn’t that like a ball fan? To
day, his team is peaches and cream;
tomorrow, it is gall and wormwood.
Today, he can pat a player on the
back; tomorrow, he calls him a bum
and hurls pop bottles, maybe, at him. i
Today, the player is a red, red, rose;
tomorrow, he is a rotten egg. When
the club wins, it can have the fan’s
wallet and all it contains; when it
loses, he wants it all back with in-1
terest. So, today, the Yanks are
Dead Sea fruit; less than a week ago,
they were oranges ripening on the:
tree. A few days ago, they were;
stepping high, on top of the base ball :
earth; today, they are beneath the
sod, and the fans have erected a
marker to the grave, inscribed: “Res- j
quiat in pace”, with not a flower to
note their passing. A fate awaiting
many another.
As usual, I’m trying to fill this,
column up with vapid mutterings;
and the day is, as usual, Tuesday,
the day before the scrap collection; !
therefore, I can’t tell you anything
concerning how much came in, nor
can I do any urging to make the a
mount to something to write home a
bout. But I’m hoping to see a pilej
high enough to prevent the Nasti-
Jap to look over; and wide enough
to mold war weapons that will put
the whole gang out of business for
centuries to come. The Jap has said,
and he believes he is uttering the
truth, that he will dictate peace to
Americans on the lawn of the White
House. The German believes he is 1
the elite of the Earth, altho’ it is a
nation of debauched womanhood with
a progeny of bastards. It would be ‘
well if the two would fly at one ,
another’s throats; and would do, as ,
the two snakes did, about which I ‘
wrote in this column not long ago—
eat each other up. What a nauseat
ing dose that would be to each.
So, I hope we’ll build a barrier a
round our White House lawn with
what we’ve thrown on the junk heap,
so high that Mr. Jap will have to
grow a little taller to climb over; ,
we’ll build sea-going craft that will
guard our shores; we’ll construct
submarines that can be as sneaky as
those of our foes; and will manufac
ture planes to blow the enemy to bits
before they get started across the big
ditch.
If you’ve negleced to add to the
scrap pile on the day appointed, let
this be a reminder to bring it in later.
This is a serious business, and every
body should take it seriously.
WORCESTER DEMOCRAT
WM. S. COSTON 1
WRITES OF THE
HORRORS OF WAR
He Has Just Returned To This
Country After Being Held
Prisoner By The Japs
MR. COSTEN IS FORMER
RESIDENT OF POCOMOIvE
On December 8, 1941, across the
harbor in the hills of Kowloon, Jap
anese guns opened fire on the Island
|of Hong Kong, this being our first
; knowledge of the fact that war was
at hand. Their planes followed,
searching out military objectives,
more frequently missing than hitting
Ihe points sought. Hong Kong’s resi
dential section is built on what is
called “The Peak” or a series of hills
accessible by tramway and excellent
roads, whereas its business district
is on the harbor level. From points
of vantage on the peak our guns re
sponded anti-aircraft and long
ran g ej —but unfortunately no planes
were available, and only one small t
gunboat represented the navy. Thus
began a battle in which we were
poorly equipped throughout its dura
tion —a period of eighteen days—un- 1
til Hong Kong surrendered on Christ
mas Day to the Japanese.
While we well knew that surren
der would bring no festivities for us,
still little did we know that in emer
ging from these tragic days and
(Continued On Page 6)
staged
FOR CIVILIAN DEFENSE
A horse show for the benefit of,
Hebron Civilian Defense, will be stag
ed on the St. Giles farm, owned by
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bounds, Hebron
Maryland, this Saturday, October 10,
starting at 10:30 A. M.
The program of the day will in
i elude saddle horses, ponies, hunters,
drivers, walkers, and others.
The admissions are as follows:
Adults, 25 cents; children, 15 cents;
Ringside Parking Car, 50 cents.
HOMEMAKERS
ARE GUESTS OF
TWO HOSTESSES
*
Mrs. Talmadge Beauchamp And
Mrs. James Cottman Enter
tain Large Number
The regular meeting of the Quin
ton Homemakers Club was held at
the home of Mrs. James Cottman
with Mrs. Talrnadge Beauchamp joint
hostess. There was a large attend
ance with two new members joining
the club. The President, Mrs. Ralph
Gordy, presided.
Following the usual business
ing, Mrs. Verlin Krabill gave a read
ing, “I want to build a home.” Our
President asked that the club spon
sor the collection of scrap in the com
munity, the proceeds from which to 1
be given to the Red Cross. During
the past month the club members (
made twenty-four hospital shirts for
- Red Cross.
The Home Demonstration agent,
Miss Hilda Topfer ably defined and
discussed the topic for the month, i i
“Credit Buying.” She brought a |
sample kit which the Red Cross is
fitting out for the soldiers and ex
plained how these kits are to be filled,
(Continued on Page 8)
EXPLANATION
In last week’s issue of the
“Democrat” the statement that
the American Legion, through
its Post Commander, William
L. Bennett, very patriotically
sponsored the Junk Rally ad
vertisement which appeared in
the above-mentioned issue was
unintentionally omitted. The
“Democrat” regrets the fail
ure to give the Legion credit
therefor.
r THE
COPY
FIVE PERIODS DIVIDE
THE RATIONING PLANS
The heating system under the fuel
oil rationing plan will be divided into
five periods, it was announced this
week by the Office of Price Adminis
tration. The periods will be varied
slightly among the four zones. Al
though the date of issuing ration
books has not been definitely set, the
actual rationing will started October’
Ist.
The five periods as set tentative
ly ai’e:
Period 1 December 3.
Period 2 January 4
Period 3 February 2
Period 4 March 6
Period 5 September 30 :
The consumer himself must take 1
four definite steps before he can ap
ply for oil ration books.
Have the fuel tank filled before |
October 1.
Check amount of oil in the tank on
October 1.
Obtain record of the amount of oil
purchased last year.
M. W. JONES DIES
AFTER COLUSION
WITH A TRUCK
Was Riding Bicycle On By-Pass
When Hit By Vehicle Driv
en By Powell, A Negro
Charles Powell, negro, 36, was ar
raigned before Magistrate Walter W.
Price early this week on a charge of
manslaughter, and afterwards releas
ed on bail.
Powell was arrested when Maurice \
W. Jones, 56, of Pocomoke died in
stantly when struck by a truck driv
len by Powell on the Pocomoke by
pass early Tuesday morning. Jones’
neck was broken according to the
report of Medical Examiner and De
puty Sheriff Crawford B. Hillman.
Deputy Sheriff Hillman said O. W.
Thomas, Pocomoke, told him he was
driving in the rear of the truck when ,
he saw something fall over the side
of the road and thought at first
something had fallen from the truck.
The truck belonged to Mr. William
Lewis, of Snow Hill.
Hillman said evidently the truck,
driven by Charles Powell, negro, |
# (Continued on Page 8)
coloneThoTtenstein
LEGAL ADVISOR AT CAMP
The Armored Division has its own
legal adviser at Camp Campbell, Ten
nessee.
Lt. Col. David Hottenstein is the
judge advocate for the new division
and has his office in the headquar
ters building on the post .
It is the duty of this officer to ad- j
vise the division commander and his
staff on questions of law. He also
supervises the administration of mili
tary justice within the entire division.
Col. Hottenstein, a native of Snow
Hill, is a graduate of Western Mary
land College and attended George
Washington University from 1937 to
1939, where he received his L. L. M.
and J. D. degrees. Before joining
the Armored Force, he was with the
Coast Artillery Corps and the Judge
Advocate General’s Department.
Col. Hottenstein is a brother of Mr.
T. C. Hottenstein of near Pocomoke.
COUNTY HEALTH :
DEPARTMENT’S
OCT. SCHEDULE
Dates And Places For Treat- <
ntent Of The Various Phases
Of Many Diseases
i
The Worcester County Health De
partment has arranged the following
schedule for the remainder of the ,
month of October: (
Friday, 9, X-Ray Clinic, Pocomoke, ;
2 P.M. Venereal Disease Clinic, Ber- 1
lin, 8 P. M. •
Monday, 12, Holiday. Tuesday, 13, ,
Venereal Disease Clinic, Pocomoke, r
(Continued on Page 5) j i
AND
1 HE LEDGER-ENTERPRISE
POCOMOKE CITY, MD., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1942
MISS FRENCH IS
MARRIED TO
MR. T. V. ZUG
Senator And Mrs. Yease\ And
Mrs. \V. C. ( ullen Of This
( it\. Attended Wedding
The marriage of Miss Lenore
Roussel French, daughter of Mr. and ;
Mrs. J. Graham French, of 2106 Pine
: Stieet, Philadelphia to Ensign Thom
as Veasey Zug, U. S. N. R., son of ,
i Mrs. Charles Keller Zug, of Chestnut |
Hill took place Saturday at Holy!
Trinity Chapel at four o’clock. Rev. 1
j B. Janney Rudderow and Rev. Dr.
Leicester C. Lewis, officiated.
The bride, given in marriage by j
her father, wore a gown of ivory
tone satin with a fitted bodice, a
V-neckline, long tapering sleeves,
i with a full skirt which flared to form
the train. Her tulle veil which was
edged with rose point lace, fell from
a tiara of the lace, completely en
veloping the train. She carried a
bouquet of gardenias and bouvardia.
Miss Mary Lewis Mayer, acting as
maid of honor, wore a gown of gold
colored taffeta, the torso bodice scal
(Continued on Page 5)
INFORMATION AS TO
SUGAR STAMP NO. 8
Retailers were cautioned last week
against accepting any ration stamps
other than No. 8 for sales of sugar
during the month of October. Mr.
J. O. Byrd, Chairman of Worcester
County War Price and Rationing
Board, said there was some confus
ion among consumers and retailers
as to the period covered by the No. I
8 stamp.
He pointed out that No. 8* stamp is
good through October 31. The im
pression of some retailers and con
sumers was that the stamp expired
!on September 30. This is incorrect.
, The value of the No. 8 stamp was
; set at five pounds of sugar for the
j ten-week period beginning August |
! 23 and ending October 31.
s. e7bonneville
PASSED AWAY IN
CLEVELAND, OHIO
Was A Native Son And For
Years One Of Washington's
Leading Hotel Managers
FUNERAL SERVICES HELD
HERE ON WEDNESDAY
Another one of Pocomoke’s native
sons, whose life’s history began back j
in the early 70’s, passed away in St.
Luke’s hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, on
Monday last, after an illness of more
or less cardiac intensity extending
over a period of more than a decade.
The deceased was Samuel Earl
Bonneville, son of the late Mr. and
Mrs. T. Francis Bonneville well known
in this community for many years.
The son, S. E., was bom June 6, 1871;
died October 5, 1942, aged 71 years. ‘
Mr. Bonneville, at the retirement
(Continued on Page 5)
SICK NEGRO WOMAN
DIES FROM BURNS
Amintha Holmes, a 65-year-old
colored woman, who had been an in
valid for some time, and living alone,
died in the hospital from the effects
of burns which she received, when
the house, in which she was living
took fire and was practically destroy
ed.
The alarm was sounded about 5:30
A. M., on Friday of last week. Ar
riving very shortly, the firemen res
cued the sick woman, but not until
after the burns were too serious to
treat successfully. She died shortly
after arriving at the hospital. Fun
eral services were held on Sunday.
The house was located on Laurel St.,
in the section known as Bedlam.
WOMANS’ CLUB
HOLDS INITIAL
FALL MEETING
Covered Dish Luncheon In # I>eth
any Methodist Church Com
munity Room
The initial fall meeting of the Wo- i
man’s Club of Pocomoke City open
ed with a Covered Dish Luncheon
Wednesday m the Social Hall of
Bethany Methodist Church, with Mrs.
i George Henderson in charge of the
j luncheon.
A short business session, presided ,
! over by the president, Mrs. Earle
I Merrill, featured the meeting.
Mrs. Henry Watson, chairman of,
! the program, opened it with Salute to
the Flag, followed by “The Star i
Spangled Banner”. The President’s
message was given by Mrs. Merrill
and an outline of the year’s program 1
by Mrs. Grady E. Powell. A solo
by Mrs. Henry Watson, accompanied
by Mrs. William S. Bowen, concluded
a very enjoyable program.
The club year books were distribu
ted. These had been arranged by
Mrs. Powell, program chairman, and j
(Continued on Page 8)
FATAL TRUCK CRASH
CAUSES DEATH OF TWO—
Two men are dead, one a Wicomico
county youth and the other a soldier
from Onley, Va., following a collis
ion of two trucks Saturday last at
the Chincoteague airpoi't .
Robert P. Bayly, 16, son of Mrs.
Lillian Bayly and the late Charles
Bayly, of Delmar Road, was reported
killed outright. The soldier, James
! Davenport, of Onley, Va., died en
route to the Peninsula General Hos
pital in Salisbury. His brother, Roy
Davenport, who was in the truck with
him, was not critically injured.
Bayly was said to have been in one
truck and the Davenport brothers in
the other. Both trucks were used for
j dumping in the airport construction
work at Chincoteague.
Virginia state police are investiga-
I ting the accident.
LOCAfSCHOOLS
GOOD RECORD
FOR SEPT. ’42
Pocomoke High Leads The List:
Pocomoke And Berlin Tie
For Elementary Honors
NEARLY ALL THE GROUPS
SURPASS 1941 AVERAGES
Pocomoke City white schools j
| rounded out a very creditable first j
month’s attendance record. The high
school leads the procession; and the
two elementary divisions, A and B,
stand No. 2 and No. 1 respectively;
Pocomoke B, however, is tied by Ber
lin B at 96.1. It is hoped this good
beginning may characterize the whole
1942-43 session.
Pocomoke leads the high schools
at 95; Snow Hill, 94.2; Ocean City,
92.5; and Berlin, 91.8. Stockton has
been dropped from the list of high
schools, the pupils being divided be
tween Pocomoke and Snow Hill.
In the graded group, Pocomoke A
and Berlin B are tied for first honors
at 96.1; Pocomoke B, 95.9; Stockton,
95.1; Bishopville, 94.9; Berlin A, 93.8;
Snow Hill, 93.8; and Ocean City, 93.1.
Girdletree leads the two-teacher
schools with 98.3; Newark, 96.4;
Whaleyville, 91.7.
St. Martin ,the only one-teacher |
school, is still trying to beat its own
record, and it did this year. In 1941
September grade was 93.5; for this
year, 96.7. However according to
Mrs. Pilchard, attendance officer, all
types of schools have increased their
September attendance this year over
that of last.
Among the colored schools, the Po
comoke attendance lags somewhat.
The high school is No. 2 in a list of
three; and the graded school brings
up the rear.
(Continued on Page 8)
Enoch Pratt Library
Mavyland r^l { J RE SERVICE
$1.50 T ™
RALLY DAY SERVICES
BY SALEM METHODISTS
Next Sunday, October 11th will be;
an important date in the program of
jthe work of Salem Methodist Church.
In the Church School it is Rally Day
and the general superintendent, Har
ry D. Melvin and his officers and |
teachers, are expecting the attend
ance to reach a high water mark. At (
the eleven o'clock church service the
Philathea Class, taught by Mrs. Wil
lard Stevenson, will present the
Church with a new set of collection
plates and a marker for the pulpit
hible. Mrs. W. R. Byrd, class presi
dent, will officially present the gifts
;of the class to the Church and Mr. j
Willard J. Stevenson, Chairman of
; the Board of Stewards will officially
receive the gifts after which the pas
-1 tor, Rev. Ralph J. Yow, will deliver
a short dedicatory address and place
the plates and marker in use for the
, first time. All members, former
I members and visitors are most cor
dially invited to be present.
UNITED JEWISH
APPEAL CAMPAIGN
BEGINS SUNDAY
Campaign Inaugurated By A
Buffet Supper At The Local
Synagogue, 6 O’clock
Pocomoke City and environs, will
come to the rescue of millions of peo
ple ovei-seas smarting under the yoke
of Nazism. The local United Jewish
Appeal campaign with a quota of
$750 will open with a buffet supper
to be held at the local synagogue, on
! Sunday, October 11th at 6 P. M.
Pocomoke City, Md., and environs
will join communities throughout
America in contributing its propor
tionate share toward the $25,000,000
national goal. Jews as well as non-
Jews are urged to contribute to this
great humanitarian effort which does
' not discriminate between race or re
ligion. Since the inception of the
Joint Distribution Committee in 1914,
close to $7,000,000 has been spent on
I non-sectarian work. At this moment
this organization which derives its
; funds from the United Jewis Ap
peal is engrossed in providing relief
(Continue i on Page 5)
QUIET - WEDDING IS
SOLEMNIZED OCT. 6
A very quiet wedding was solemn
ized Tuesday, October 6, when Miss
Ruth May Lawson, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Norman Lawson, of Cris
i field, became the bride of Mr. Wil
liam Edward Taylor, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Neal Taylor, of near this city.
The ceremony was performed at
the Baptist parsonage, the Rev. J. A.
Ditto, pastor of the church, officia
| ting.
j The ceremony was witnessed by
Mrs. Neal Taylor, Mrs. Oscar John
! son and little daughter and Mr. Ralph
j Taylor.
The bride is well known in Cris-
I field, where she was a popular mem
ber of the younger set. The young
I couple will make their home for the
present with the groom’s parents.
MORRIS PARSONS
IS SELECTED AS
RADIO EXPERT
I Gets Work As Specialized
Trainer In Radio Communi
cations In U. S. N. R.
A letter received by Mr. and Mrs.
Luther G. Parsons this week from El
mer H. Schubert, Lieut. Commander,
U. S. N. R. of the Naval Training !
School (Radio), University of Wis-!
consin, announced the selection of
their son, Morris Vernon Parsons, for
specialized advanced training in ra
dio communications.
The letter in pari states “Recent
ly a new group of Navy men came to 1
the eampns of the University of Wis
consin. Your bluejacket is among
(Continued on Page 8) j
BUY
1 UMITSD
STATE#
j^^KSTAJbtPS
J 5555553
VOLUME 62 NO. 41
16000 POUNDS
JUNK AND SCRAP
DONATED HERE
Chairman Walters Announces
Another Opportunity For
Those Who Did Not Give
AMOUNT GIVEN IS
VERY SATISFACTORY
About 16,000 pounds of junk were
dropped on the elementary school
grounds on Wednesday, and, at this
writing, should be there still if the
Pocomoke “kids” haven’t carried all
home in their pockets. They swarm
ed over that pile of scrap like ants
i over a juicy heap of tasty carrion,
• apparently looking for something
they could carry home for their pri
vate amusement during the winter
days of sleet and cold. The Yaps
arid the Japs meant nothing in their
young lives, and the arts of extrac
tion and secretion seemed to be very
highly developed in their nature. To
those who saw them at work, it was
an exhibition of youthful energy ex
erted in the wrong direction.
The amount of scrap brought in on
Wednesday and dumped on the school
ground represents only war material
donated by the citizens.. Additional
scrap was brought in and sold to deal
ers. As soon as possible, informa
tion will be given out as to the a
mount contributed and sold during
the campaign which began on Sep
(Continued on Page 8)
MARRIAGE ANNOUNCED
OF MISS HOTTENSTEIN
Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Hottenstein an
nounce the marriage of their daugh
-11 ter, Betty E. Hottenstein to Pvt. Ed
win C. Crosby, of the U. S. Army.
The marriage took place in Wilming
; ton, September 18, 1942.
Pvt. Crosby is the son of Mr. and
; Mrs. John Crosby, of Oxford, Md.
’ The bride is a Public Health nurse
1 j in Wilmington, Del. The groom is
‘ on a ship the U. S. A. Mine Planter,
’; “General Schoolfield.”
CUB BOY SCOUT
RECEIVES LIONS
BADGE HONOR
First Local Boy Scout Ever To
Secure Distinction, Gets A
ward From Scout Master
At a meeting of the Cub Boy
, Scouts held in the Presbyterian
Church, this city, October 2, 1942,
Robert Lee Hall, Jr., son of Dr. and
Mrs. Robert Lee Hall, of this was
awarded the Lion Badge, the cere
mony being presided over by Cub
Scout Master of Pack 153.
Young Hall had been working for
the distinction for three years, and,
as might be expected, was very much
elated to receive this cub honor. He
has the additional honor of being the
first Pocomoke Scout to obtain the
badge.
Robert Hall joined the Cub Scouts
in 1939. He immediately started his
career by passing the necessary Bob
cat requirements which made him a
registered Cub Scout under the Boy
i Scouts of America. He now was a
; full-fledged Cub and allowed to wear
j the Cub Uniform and Badge. From
j here he started on his journey to
ward becoming a Wolf Cub. After
! a year’s hard work, he finished the
Wolf requirements and was award
ed the Wolf Badge. On Robert’s
(Continued on Page 8)
MISS JANE LANKFORD’S
ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Lankford, of
Pocomoke City, announce the engage
ment of their daughter, Miss Jane
Wesley Lankford to Mr. Howard Her
bert Hirzel, of Wilmington, Delaware.
The wedding will take place early
in November.

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