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The midland journal. (Rising Sun, Md.) 1885-1947, December 22, 1933, Image 7

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060136/1933-12-22/ed-1/seq-7/

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MIDLAND JOURNAL, RISING SUN, MD.
BEAUTY
TALKS
By
MARJORIE DUNCAN
FINE POINTS IN MAKE-UP
A LWAYS apply your make-up b®-
** fore a good, clear mirror, prefer
ably one of the magnifying mirrors
which were so very expensive a yeai
or so ago but have since been consid
erably reduced.
Then, be sure to have that mirror
so that the light from a nearby win
dow falls over your shoulder and full
on your face without any distorting
shadows. Also when make-up is used
for daytime be sure It Is applied In
daylight and when intended for eve
ning it should be applied before artifi
cial lights.
Now let us start changing facial
contours by means of make-up. When
applying rouge, don’t color both cheeks
exactly the same. Nature doesn’t bal
ance the two halves of our faces, yon
know. High cheek bones can be made
to look less prominent If rouge la
blended directly over them. Hollows
in the cheeks should be rouged. It
makes the face look fuller. A long,
thin face may be made to look broader
if the rouge is blended from the cheek
bones well outward toward the ears.
Bring your color over the greater por
tion of the cheek, but avoid getting
the rouge too low as that gives an old
and hard appearance and makes the
contrast between powdered neck and
rouged jaw line too great A very
broad face can be made to look longer
or thinner if the rouge is placed a
little below the cheek bones and Just
a small part of the cheek rouged, leav
ing white space between the nose and
the rouged area and again between
the outer edge or rouge and the ears.
Now for the mouth —do not rouge
a very full lower lip at all. Simply
apply lip paste to the upper lip and
rub the two lips together to get a little
color on the lower lip.
For a full upper lip, blend the rouge
so that it fades completely before
reaching the outer edges—that is the
upper lip and outline.
If the mouth is too long stop the
rouge at a little past the center and
blend so that It fades completely be
fore reaching the corners.
The very thin mouth can be made to
look more generous if the rouge is car
ried well up and down to the edges
and a little past the actual outline of
the lips.
There are any number of little tricks
one can employ to enhance the work
of Dame Nature. Make-up Is a fine
art It requires practice and per
sistent experimenting before perfec
tion is attained.
Normally your make-up shouldn’t
need altering during the day, whether
you’re swimming, or exercising stren
uously, or going through a normal
routine. If your face gets dirty use soap
and water and dust it with powder
brushed off with a camel’s hair brush.
• • •
WHY SOME TREATMENTS FAIL
I HAVE had a great many letters,
the gist of which is: “Why has my
beauty treatment failed to bring the
desired results?’’ Occasionally, it is
difficult to say. But, more frequently
“there’s a reason.”
In the first place, too much em
phasis is put on the local treatment
and the use of creams and lotions and
too little said about keeping the sys
tem in trim. Mind you. lam not cast
ing any aspersions on creams and lo
tions for I very strongly advocate their
use. But women are more prone to
spend time and energy and money on
these preparations than on studying
diet and exercising.
If I were selling an acne cream or
lotion, I would tell the customer that
the preparation would very definitely
help providing that her diet was right,
that she was exercising, watching her
system to see that all waste Is regular
ly eliminated. In other words, erup
tions are as a rule, caused by some
systemic disturbance, and most fre
quently Indigestion, constipation, etc.,
and the cause must be corrected or al
together successful results cannot be
expected from external applications.
Can creams or lotions applied to the
face correct a condition of chronic con
stipation? No—of course not. Once
the cause is corrected the creams and
lotions may serve to give the skin
a clear and radiant look, but not be
fore then.
There are a great many conditions
that can be treated by external means,
to be sure. Freckles, for Instance, can
be bleached from without But the
majority of skin and hair conditions
need both external as well as in
ternal care.
Another reason why some beauty
treatments are unsuccessful for one
woman and quite successful for an
other is simply that skins do differ.
This Is a very important point. Wom
en with dry skins need nourishing skin
foods. Women with oily skins need as
tringents.
Improper method of application, dis
regard of directions, and haphazard,
belter skelter, “now and then" applica
tions Instead of regular, persistent
care are other reasons why treatments
fall.
If I advise you to do this or that
I want you to do your part under-
There is a definite reason
for It aIL The better you understand
the more faith you will have, the more
direct your efforts will be, the surer
and swifter the results.
A. BtU Smdlcaf ■ WXTJ ferric*.
qJL Fein
m Little ®
■■— - --
IN LUCK
“I think that fellow Smithson’s
the luckiest fellow alive,” said Hayes
to his fellow worker.
“Lucky?” repeated the other. “I
don’t call it lucky to be injured like
he was."
“But he doesn’t have to work now,”
said Hayes.
"I know he doesn’t, you
brute,” replied his companion
warmly.
“But you don't understand me,”
explained Hayes. “He’s getting com
pensation now, whereas most of his
former fellow workers have lost their
jobs.”
Young Tree
Little Helen, age six, a struggling
“young artist,” painted a picture of
a little girl and a tree. She was told
the picture was out of proportion—
the little girl was larger than the
tree. After some thought she replied:
“Well, this is just a young tree."
CROSSWORD PUZZLES
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Copyright,
Horizontal.
1— A dark far
4—Found on through train*
7—Tnrned white
10—A single time 11—Paradise
12—Possessed 13—Pattern
16—Prefix meaning new
lft—Barren of moisture 20—Seat
21—An Important bone
23—To wind or roll together
25 A utensil used In building
26 A famous gladiator
20—A beverage
30— To make senseless by violence
31— To carry
33—Secretary of state under President
Lincoln
35—Before 37—A color
40— In the past
41— A city of northern France
43—By way of 44—To suit
45 Well paying
46 A kind of whisky
47 A measure
40—An article of faith
50—To scold 52—Yielded assent
55 To put on
56 In law to Impede or bar
58—The secondary movement In a mu
sical composition
60— A kind of berry
61— To make knotted lace
63—A city of Canada
06 —That chewed twice
GS—A Roman Emperor who killed him*
self
70— To recline
71— A river of China
72 A famous French Illustrator
73 An animal of the Far North
75—To go In 77—A domestic animal
78— To disrupt
79 An ancient country near the Per
sian gulf
SO—A kind of flower
81—Overly supplied 82—To deserve
Vertical.
I“—An exclamation found In proverbs
2 Burden 3—To conclude
4—To behave s—To bow
6 A widow
7 A place of restraint
O—Again 9—To cover
12—Concealed
14— Poetic for above
15— A period of time
MORE SATISFACTION k
CANT BE BOUGHT^A^I*
GRAHAM lIPi FAMOUS114010 announcei>
MCNAMFP^^^^bS' I ’** announce to the
ITI wor|d that THE EDISON
is a great Hotel"
(FROM V
HOTEL EDISON
™ / 47th ST. w.„ o rway NEW YORK
MOO ROOMS UCM WITH BATH, RADIO AMO CIRCULATING ICE WATER
ERROR SOMEWHERE
The film director was making a
real thriller and working very hard
to get action into it.
Finally, he turned from the brink
of tlie clilT. mopped his brow, and
glanced at a dummy made of straw
and old clothes lying on the ground
beside him.
“Good heavens!” he shouted. “Who
was it we threw over the cliff?”
Just the Thing
Two high school girls were talking
about getting a birthday gift for a
friend.
“Let’s get her one of those dickie
doos they have in the florist’s win
dow," suggested one girl.
“Dickie-doos?” questioned her
friend. “Oh, yes, you mean those
thing-a-ma-gigs. Yes, 1 think that
would be Just the thing.”—lndian
apolis News.
Points of Stress
“My boy Josh is a great help,” said
Farmer Corntassel.
“How?”
“He criticizes my speeches. He
says my emphasis is all right, but
sometimes I put it on the penult in
stead of the antepenult It’s the first
time I knew we had raised any such
things on the place.”
Thanksgiving Starters
A primary pupil inquired: "Who
started Thanksgiving?”
The reply from his schoolmate
was: “The Turks, of course.”
17—A money introduced into Engliai
by the Danes
lft—Part 20— Slang for potato
22—A device for marking a channel
24—T00 20—Wandering actors
27 New land
28— A famous Scotch author
30—To sink in the middle
32—A high priest mentioned In Samuel
53 Capital of a Balkan country
34 To sprinkle
35 Made a mistake 30—Devoured
38—Musical term meaning slow
30—Divisions of time
41— A division of a play
42 To occupy a chair 48—To rent
51—Corroded 53—A domestic animal
54 A device for telling time
50—A biblical man's name
57 To rain hard
58— A kind of willow 60—Plew
61— Having a slight color
62 Possessive pronoun (old form)
64—Knowledge 65—Article
66 Part of a gear wheel
67 City In Holland whose name ta
used to specify color
68— A kind of grain
72—A round top of a building
74—A low island 77—A kind of meat
Solution
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