OCR Interpretation


The midland journal. (Rising Sun, Md.) 1885-1947, July 23, 1937, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060136/1937-07-23/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HYDRAULIC* BRAK LS
/ ll
||> 1 THE ONLY COMPLETE CAR •PRICED SO LOW! Vj
t. - -:" : - fe .Jl - ; I ; M
V
V 1 '' j! 1 VlwuMilli ■ 'K’N.
k
<\- MlM* FOR KrOHOMICAL
g 8: ' I •“*** TRAM BFORTATIOM
||BB , W NIW HIGH • COMPRESSION VALVE-IN-HEAD ENGINE - NEW ALL-SILENT, ALL-STEEL
1 Jz 3&j :. : A BODIES—NEW DIAMOND CROWN SPEEDLINE STYLING—PERFECTED HTDEAULIC WAKES
tI A^-iH,ir "-■"■ —-IMPROVED GLIDING KNEE-ACTION ride*-safety plate glass all around
£|ra*H^s? ** Jo||s wl ><;! GENUINE PISHER NO DRAFT VENTILATION - SUPER-SAFE SHOCKPROOF STEERING*.
*Kn-A<Hon and Shockproof gtoorlng on Mnttor B. tw modal, only.
ru> Oonoral Motor* InttaUmont Plan—monthly paymontt to utt year pun*.
MW CHEVROLET MOTOR DIVISION, Ganoral Motor* Sale* Corporation, DETROIT, MICHIGAN
*A. J. Dinsmore & Bro. Ph ° ne 108 Rising Sun, Maryland
THIRTEEN MILLIONTH
CHEVROLET
Another milestone in industry was
reached Wedesday, when the 13-mil
llonth Chevrolet rolled off the assem
bly line in the Flint plant of the
Chevolet Division, General Motors
Corporation.
In spite of interrupted production,
Chevrolet’s 13 th millionth car was
produced in a period of just two days
more than 11 months, the second
shortest million-unit period in the
company’s history. Officials stated
that the demand for the 193 7 models
has exceeded anything heretofore
known, and that, but for the fre
quent interruptions of output since
Jan. 1, production and workers' wag
es would have shattered all previous
records, and the present milestone
would have been reached from 60 to
90 days earlier.
Production of No. 13 million was
marked by no ceremonies at the
factory, but M. E. Coyle, general
manager of the division, issued a
brief statement from his Detroit offi
ce officially announcing the event,
which was also the occasion for an
informal luncheon, attended by Mr
Coyle, Mr. Holler, and other execu
tives of the company.
When the present management,
headed by Mr. Coyle, took over the
reins in October, 1933, the company
had built 9,000,000 cars and trucks.
The 10-millionth was produced Nov.
20, 1934, the 11-millionth Dec. 4,
1936, and the 12-millionth August 5,
1936. Records show that it took 12
years for the company to build its
first million units, while the remain
ing 12 million have been produced in
a period of only 14 years. Mr. Coyle
has been a member of the Chevolet
organization throughout the produc
tion of all but 120,000 of the 13,-
000,000 units built to date.
O
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SERVICES
"Truth” will be the subject of the
Lesson-Sermon in all Churches of
Christ, Scientist, on Sunday, July 25.
The Golden Text will be from Psa.
117:2- “The truth of the Lord en
dureth forever. Praise ye the Lord.”
Among the oitations comprising
the Leeson-Sermon will be the follow
ing from the Bible: Isa. 26:1-
“O Lord, thou art my God, I will
exalt thee; I will praise thy name;
for thou hast done wonderful things;
thy counsels of old are faithfulness
and truth.”
The Lesson-Sermon also will in
clude the following passage from the
Christian Science textbook, “Scince
and Health with Key to the Script
ures, “ by Mary Baker Eddy, page
276: "Spirit, Life, Truth, Love, com
bine as one, • and are the Scriptural
naanrtar Owl.”
SCHOOL SYSTEM LACKS
VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
Howard Bell, director of the Nat
ional Youth Survey in Baltimore,
told the annual Parent-Teacher
Association conference at College
Park that "many needs are not being
met by the present school program ”
He said the present school system
did not lay sufficient emphasis on
vocational guidance. He assserted a
survey made among 13,500 children
and young people between 16 and 24
years showed eighty five per cent, of
them said the schools had not given
them adequate training in vocational
subjects.
The survey director reported that
nineteen per cent, of the 13,500 chil
dren were in school, fifty-four per
cent, had dropped out because of
economic conditions at home, and
twenty-four per cent, stopped because
of lack of interest. Sixty per cent., he
added, declared that if they had the
opportunity, they would take voca
tional training.
Mr. Bell continued: “There should
be a closer relation betw r een the sec
ondary school training and jobs. The
junior college seems to be the adequ
ate solution for the problem.”
He said other results of the survey
showed three per cent, were dissatisfi
ed with their home conditions, and a
majority believed the city offered
more opportunities than small towns
and the country. *
Miss Elizabeth Amery, sixth vice
president of the Maryland Congress
of Parents and Teachers, and State
supervisor of home economics, advo
cated more vocational training and
advised parents to pay closer atten
tion to the child’s needs.
o
HOW YOU CAN HELP
There has never been a newspaper
printed that satisfied everybody, but
there is a very simple method by
which better newspapers can be pro
duced and that is for those who sub
scribe to them to take an individual
interest in seeing that they get more
local and personal news.
If you have visitors, if you have
been on a visit or if you are going on
one your neighbors are sure to be in
terested in knowing about it. Tell
them through your home town paper.
Every little item of a local or person
jal nature helps just that much to
j make a still better newspaper and
getting it to the editor requires very
little exertion on your part. That is
how you can help make your news
paper still more interesting, and you
are invited to start doing so at
once.—Ex.
And when a woman feels her su
periority she never overlooks an
opportunity to show it- 1
'4.
THE MlDlAtfD JOITUffAL, FRIDAY, JULY 88,1887
MRS. ROOSEVELT LIKES FAIR “SAMPLE”
IE;:Oi #lSfc : '"%£
m 4 ILr*”'
x§M&&su!k mmk :. .•.•?'•-•?->.',-••.•
IS® IHF- - ■
mHNmMF jj^H-v;^
llli jmmm *
—\<*ym ■§ ./MB
'. Al> ♦ ~
' ' ■: I
M ■£, - ,
m KL.IH Bw IS
A
ss&•>-'■■■ •■ # "■ i'"’
k. _
fl^kjO^,' :-^v- j iSm
NEW YORK (Special). —Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of the Presi
dent, like more than 200,000 others persons from all over the world, has
already sampled the New York World’s Fair of 1939 by visiting the exhibit
the Fair Corporation maintains for the public on the Fifth Avenue floor
of the Empire State building.
“I am much interested in this Fair,’' said Mrs. Roosevelt, after she
had seen the ingeniously illuminated piodels and animated displays that
promise so many wonders for the Nation's Fair.” "It seems to me that
there is opportunity here to do a remarkable piece of work from the edu
cational standpoint. The conception of the whole Fair as outlined to me
sounds very provocative of thought.” The theme of the Fair is “Building
the World of Tomorrow."
LEAVE OF ABSENCE FOR
SCHOOL YEAR
Earle T. Hawkins, former princi
pal of the Chesapeake City High
School, and now principal of the Bel
Air High School, has been granted a
leave of absence for the next school
year in order to take a course in Yale
University. A teaching fellowship
has been awarded Mr. Hawkins and
he will teach psychology of adoles
cence in the department of education
while studying for his Ph. D. degree.
O
People favor a managed currency.
There is a feeling that It shouldn’t
1 be the only thing to esea^e.
I Letterheads I
Snuelopes !
a '(Sill Heads [
I GlveUs'Your j
1 Orders for I
f Printing 1
A fine epitaph won’t boost a
through the golden gateg,
HOMEWARD BOUND
Evangelist John Moses Baker
Baltimore, Maryland
We Are homeward bound for heaven,
That land of perfect peace
Where everlasting joy abounds,
And conflicts all have cease.
We are homeward bound for heaven,
To be with our Saviour and King,
In that land of eternal beauty
. And never ending spring.
We are homeward bound for heaven,
Where the loved ones watch and
wait,
To greet and bid us welcome,
Just inside the pearly gate.
We are homeward bound for heaven,
Where the Lamb is the light
thereof,
And the song that they sing is ever
new,
In the home land up above.
We are homeward bound fOT heaven,
How comforting the promises of
God,
That passing through the valley of
the shadows,
He will keep us safe, supported by
his rod.
o
BARN BURNED AT NEW TEXAS
Fire believed to have been caused
by spontaneous combustion on Thurs
day, about noon, destroyed the barn
on the farm of J. A. Badger, near
New Texas, Fulton Township, Lan
caster county, Pa. The structure
was a large one.
Grover Duvall, who happened to be
passing, did good work in saving the
livestock from the burning building.
The flames started in the mow.
The flames quickly licked up the
25 tons of hay, 175 bushels of wheat,
all the farm implements and a set of
harness. Fifty chickens perished In
the fire.
The firemen saved the woodhouse
and other buildings. It and the
house have shingle roofs. Chemicals
and water from the well were used
to good purpose.
There is some insurance on the
barn but none is carried on the con
tents. The loss is estimated at
$6,000.
TO PURCHASE EPHRATA CLOIS
TERS
Governor George H. Earle, of
Pennsylvania, has signed a bill pro
viding for the purchase of the Eph
rata Cloisters.
The Cloisters bill provides $15,000
to buy the Ephrata Cloisters, found
ed in 1735 by Conrad Beissel as a
monastery for the Seventh Day
Baptists.
O
’ Nine men out of ten overestimate
their Importance ip the world.
JAPANESE BEETLES EMERGING
IN SOME AREAS OS*
MARYLAND
Japanese beetles are emerging in
s warms jin the heavily infested, areas
of Maryland, according to Dr. Ernest
N- Cory, state entomologist, and Dr.
George S. Langford, specialist in in*
sect control, who have just returned
from the Eastern Shore where they
observed beetle conditions.
Dr. Cory states that his office Is re
ceiving a great many reports of In
jury from alarmed householders and
farmers. Ornamentals, flowers, grape
vines and various fruit trees are eith
er being destroyed or badly defoliat
ed, he says, in and around Baltimore
City, Cambridge, Colate and Elkton.
Beetles are also making their appear
ance in limited numbers in many oth
er towns.
Caught off guard by the sudden
appearance of the beetles, the spec
ialists state, many residents have al
lowed their plants to be injured,
while others are busy sparying with
a whitewash consisting of one pound
of hydrated lime in three gallons of
water, which, they declare, is non
poisonous, but keeps the beetles
from feeding on the foliage of grapes
and fruit trees. Other remedies that
afford protection are sparys made
with either arsenate of lead, or a
four-percent rotenone dust in com
bination with a sticker such as rosin
residue emulsion. The use of baited
traps is valuable also in catching
large quantities of Japanese beetles,
it is stated.
Despair is general in many local
ities, Dr. Cory states, because of the
inability of state officials to under
take a retardation program this year.
He explained that his department has
operated with vigor a retardation
program for the last nine years.
Because of lack of funds the work
done this year will be very limited.
He states, however, that the legisla
ture has made available funds for
1938 and 1939 and promises an en
ergetic program of work beginning
in 1938.
Limited experiments are being
conducted to determine the efficiency
of large traps of various designs for
catching beetles, and the use of bait
for attracting the beetles. Attention
is being given also to improving
machinery and methods employed in
the inspection of nursery stock and
farm produce that is quarantined and
being offered by shippers and farm
ers to be sent into uninfested
territory.
iil
0
AAA PLAN TO BE CHECKED
The work of checking performance
of farmers taking part in the 1937
Agricultural Conservation Program
will get under way in Cecil County;
early in July, it is announced by J;. Z.
Miller, county agent.
Perforance will be checked by loc
al supervisors who will visit each
participating farm toi obtain inform
ation about what actually has been
done by the farmer toward meeting
the conditions of payment provided
in the 1937 program. Local super
visors are now receiving training
through the assistance of state super
visors. They will report the facta
determined for each farm to the
County Committee to be used as a
basis for the preparation for pay
ment.
Each farmer will be asked to assist
the supervisor who visits his farm in
preparing a report of the 1937 farm
ing operations. The report will in
clude a sketch of the farm showng
fields, the acreage of crops grown in
the fields, the soil-building practices
carried out, and the names of the per
sons sharing in the crops andl
practices.
In connection with the soil
building practices carried out; the
seeding of legumes and perennial
grasses, the turning under of green
manure crops, the application o£
ground limestone or the use of super
phosphate in connection with certain
legumes and perennial grasses, farm
ers will be asked to supply records,
or to show otherwise that they have
carried out the practies.
Mr. Miller states that payments to
farmers and for administrative ex
penses are both made from funds ap
propriated in connection with the
conservation program and that the)
expenses of administering the pro
gram will affect the total payments
to be made farmers. Since the
checking of preformance is the most
expensive part of administering the
progarm, cooperation by farmers in
supplying complete and accurate in
formation to supervisors will be oC
great help, in keeping down expense*.
o
Science Explains Aching Feet
“Ladies keep your shoes on - or see
a doctor.” Scientific research reveals
that foot ailments come from
badly shaped shoes. Read this Inter
esting illustrated story in the July
25th issue of the American Weekly,
the big feature magazine, each week
with The Baltimore Sunday Ameri->
nun. On sale at your local newsdealer^

xml | txt