OCR Interpretation


The midland journal. (Rising Sun, Md.) 1885-1947, September 13, 1946, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060136/1946-09-13/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

'Bedspread With a
Permanent Valance
A BED with a valance to the
** floor has a well-dressed ap
pearance that is lacking when a
short spread is used. A plain val
ance like this repeating a color in
the room would be just as attrac
tive used with an old fashioned
g MAKE A SLIPCOVER FOR
THE HEAD OF THE BED
19 MATCH SPREAD—
quiIt for a spread; or with a cro
chet or plain spread. Five and
one-half yards of any 36-inch ma
terial split lengthwise right down
the center does it.
* *
This bedspread is from Home-Making
BOOK NO. 4 which also contains illus
trated directions for more than thirty
other things to make for the home. Read
ers may get a copy of BOOK 4 for 15
cents by sending request to;
MRS. RUTH WYETH SPEARS
Bedford Hills, N. Y. Drawer IS
Enclose 15 cents for Book No. 4.
Name
Address
•take MGHE//ERW TONIC
Scott’s Emulsion helps tone up the
system, build stamina, energy and
resistance when you feel “dragged
out” and rundown—and your diet
lacks the natural A&D Vitamins
and the energy-building: natural
oils you need. Remember—many
doctors recommend good-tasting
Scott’s. Buy today—all druggists.
Gas on Stomach
Relieved in 5 minutes or double your money back
When excess storfiach acid causes painful, suffocat
ing gas, sour stomach and heartburn, doctors usually
prescribe the fastest-acting medicines known for
symptomatic relief medicines like thos&i n Bell-ans
Tablets. No laxative. Bell-ans brings comfort in a
jiffy or double your money bade oa return of bottle
to us. 25c at all druggists.
A favorite household antiseptic dress
ing and liniment for 98 years—Hanford’s
BALSAM OF MYRRHI It contains
soothing gums to relieve the soreness and
ache of over-used and strained muscles.
Takes the sting and itch out of burns,
scalds, insect bites, oak and ivy poison
ing, wind and sun burn, chafing and
chapped skin. Its antiseptic action less
ens the danger of infection whenever the
skin is cut or broken.
Keep a bottle handy for the minor
casualties of kitchen and nursery. At
your druggist—trial size bottle 35*5;
household size 65*5; economy size $1.25.
G. C. HANFORD MFG. CO., Syracuse N. Y.
Sole makers of
Mb
k-> ?
. ’ - "W
k:k: . ' :
Yodora checks
perspiration odor
spoTtM.
Made on a face cream base. Yodora is
actually soothing to normal skins.
Entirely free from irritating salts.
Can be used right after under-arm
shaving.
Stays soft and creamy, indefinitely.
Never gets stiff or grainy.
No harsh chemicals to spoil clothing,
'flibes or jars, 104, 30 4, 60 4
Yes, Yodora is a gentle deodorant.
I>y it—feel the wonderful difference!
fpP*# ...
MOPSY tyOIADYS PARKER ,
HA</E VOU COT ONE ABOUT MY SIZE ) ,
JHAT m I JITTERBUG ? j S j
WALKING !
Home-Town Echoes By C. Kessler
AUA/ UJMEM- J
an
- -Wf TUAT<CIIIVf
, TnATbSILurl
~j*r- HCWCAN
C c
READY-STUFFED
“There you are, my dear,” she
said, “my first turkey,” as she
proudly placed the steaming bird
on the dinner table.
“It looks wonderful, darling!” her
husband responded. “What did you
stuff it with?”
“Stuff it with!” exclaimed the
bride. “Why, honey, this one wasn’t
hollow.”
Proper Color
Tim Cassidy and Barney O’Toole
met for the first time in years. The
two old friends determined to cele
brate.
‘Sure now,” said Tim. “Let’s go
out tonight and paint the town
green!”
Campus Comment
Fresh—Gee, you gave me an aw
ful fright last night.
Soph—Sorry, old man, but it was
the best blind date I could get on
shout notice.
MIDLAND JOURNAL, RISING SUN, MD.
■ " i
CHEAP MONEY
Goldstein was telling Steinmetz |
about his dream.
“And I walked into a drug store
and bought a package of razor
blades. The druggist asked for j
five dollars.”
“Five dollars for a package of ra
zor bladesl Did you give it to him?”
“Of course. 1 should worry how
I spend my money in my dreams.” ,
Dressed for Winter
With great interest six-year-old
Paula was watching her mother
pour paraffin over the jelly.
Then she went to answer the door
bell and explained her mother was
too busy to come to the door. “She’s
weather stripping the jelly,” she
said.
Pay as You Enter
New Tenant—l’U have you know
I pay as I go.
Landlord—Not here you don’t, i
You’ll pay as you come in.
Kathleen Norris Says:
Marrying From Fear
Ben Syndicate.—WNU Feature*.
"Rose-Marie wishes to marry a fine young lawyer, who already shows signs of
political advancement. He is rich, handsome, devoted.”
By KATHLEEN NORRIS
‘‘T'''\OVERTY was the cause
the miserable circum
stance of which I am writ
ing you,” says the letter of a
Portland mother. “My husband
died in 1932, leaving me with
two children, a boy of 14 and a
girl of 10. Destitute, I had to
work hard for some years to
support them, and at 16 my girl
took a job in a law office. The
boy had then won a scholarship
and was living in another town.
“Four months after she started
work my daughter confessed to
me her love for the office boss, her
relationship with him and that she
expected a child. I was then keep
ing a boarding-house in which my
oldest boarder was a man of 76 who
had considerable property. He had
long wanted to marry me, and in
my desperation I now consented
to the marriage, closed my house,
and insisted that he and I and
Rose-Marie go on a trip to Mexico.
Where we really went was to a big
eastern city, where the baby was
born. At this time my husband was
stricken with paralysis; we came
back to our home, where all our
interests were, and I represented
the child as mine. At the time I
was only 38, so that that statement
was not questioned. This man lived
until a few months ago.
“The situation now is that Rose-
Marie wishes to marry a fine young
lawyer, who already shows signs
of political advancement. He is
rich, handsome, devoted. Mean
while the contemptible married
man who was Rose-Marie’s boss
has been widowed; he is 61, a
successful business man, but to me
he would be personally disagree
able even if I did not bitterly re
sent his betrayal of my little girl
when she was only 16. The man she
has now promised to marry
knows nothing of her story, and if
I can prevent it, never will, but the
older man, Harold—my splendid
little granddaughter’s real father,
is quietly blackmailing me into a
third marriage; the thought is un
speakably revolting to me, but by
marrying this tiresome, self-satis
fied little man of 61 I feel that I
can absolutely safeguard my
daughter’s new happiness.
Rose-Marie’s Future.
“It is great happiness, it is real
happiness, Mrs. Norris. Rose-Marie
has grown, has developed in these
bitter years. She truly loves this
new man, she wants to share a dig
nified and interesting life with him;
she can do it, I know she can—and
she will. But it will be at terrible
cost to me. Harold knows that this
darling eight-year-old girl is his
child, for my heart-broken Rose-
Mane naturally told him of her
ago : izing plight. He can hold this
knowledge over us all; he has let
ters to prove it.
“Can you advise me? Just two
points more. Jane, the little girl,
intensely dislikes Harold. And
Rose Marie, believe me when I
] say this, is a gentle, fine, clean
-1 hearted girl, far stronger in charac
ter than many girls her age who
have been more fortunate. As I
began by saying, poverty wrought
, this terrible and perplexing pattern
Tku tiresome little man of 61. . . .”
A DREADFUL PROSPECT
Covering up the first false step
generally means that a chain of
difficulties has been started. So
it was for the unhappy mother
whose letter is answered in this
column.
Rose, the daughter, is engaged
to a young laivyer whom she
loves dearly. He is handsome,
rich and politically ambitious.
A dark secret in Rose's past
threatened to mar her happi
ness, however. She has a child,
born when she was only 16. Her
mother, a tvidow, married an old
man, and passed the child off as
her own to protect Rose’s name.
Now Rose’s seducer, a middle
aged man who was her employ
er, threatens to expose Rose un
less her mother will marry him.
and surely it is cruel to have the
generations go on paying so bitter
ly for what is no one’s fault.”
* * *
Poverty is hard, my dear Janet;
I know it well. But no girl gives
herself to a middle-aged married
man in the first weeks of their
acquaintanceship just because of
poverty. Rose-Marie should have
been better armed for the fight with
life.
Your idea of marrying her
seducer is fantastic; he has no
legal claim upon her or upon the
child. Rose-Marie can clear this
whole thing up and I think in
justice to you she must —by tell
ing her present sweetheart the
whole story.
Harold Can’t Do Much Harm.
It is possible that he will break
the engagement and leave her.
Political careers and histories like
this one don’t mix. Or it is pos
sible that he will look at the situ
ation honestly and generously. No
’ body knows these facts except Har
old. Even if he were contemptible
[ enough to start a whispering cam
paign, the probabilities are all
against his getting very far with
it.
Jane is established as your child,
the child of your late marriage to
the old man. To break out with evi
dence of her real parenthood would
mark Harold as a scurrilous black
mailer, and hurt him incurably with
all decent folk. The chance of his
doing this is, I believe, negligible;
that is, if he knows Rose-Marie has
made it all clear to her promised
husband.
If she marries him keeping these
facts a secret then Harold really
holds against her happiness and
security a deadly weapon, that may
well ruin her life. It is too bad that
women must pay so high for the
mistakes of girlhood, but we are
made that way, and everything that
; emancipation and independence
can do cannot seem to lessen that
situation. For your sake and the
i sake of innocent little Jane I can
only advise an honest explanation
to Rose’s young man, and then a
: confident going forward in the hope
that any scandal started by Harold
would react against himself more
i than against the girl he betrayed.
For you to make two loveless mar
riages to save the situation would
merely complicate everything.
* '
Russians Like Jazz
Eddie Rozner, one of the most
popular and hottest jazz band lead
ers in the Soviet Union, has been
brought sharply to task by the
government newspaper Izvestia,
which declared that his programs
were trivial and had “nothing in
common” with what Soviet audi
ences love.
Rozner directs the White Russian
state jazz band, and tickets always
are sold out for his shows. He says
he picked up his technique in his
youth in New York’s Harlem.
; ANOTHER f l
\ A General Quiz * £
O- <v.<v. n. fv. (V. ft*
file Questions
1. What is lacking in a person
who is anosnic?
2. Where is the “Land of the
White Elephant”?
3. How old were the Dionne
quintuplets on May 28, 1946?
4. Who did Joe Louis defeat to
become the world’s heavyweight
boxing champion?
5. What does the maxim “Ca
veat Emptor” mean?
6. The prefix tele in such words
as telegraph and telescope means
what?
7. How deep is the lake formed
by Boulder dam?
8. Dolly Madison was hostess of
the White House 16 years. How
was this possible?
The Answers
1. The sense of smell.
2. Thailand.
3. Twelve years old.
4. James J. Braddock in 1937.
5. Let the buyer beware.
6. Far off.
7. Over 500 feet.
8. Thomas Jefferson’s wife died
before he became President, so
the wife of his secretary of state
was officially hostess for eight
years. Then James Madison be
came President for two terms.
iuu ai a ut fumes of DR. R. SCHIFF*
TDtATuriiT MANNS ASTHMADOR
TREATMENT t^e next time you have an
attack of bronchial asthma. ASTHMADOR
is inexpensive - easy to use - nothing to take
internally —a dependable, effective treatment
that helps relieve the agony of the attack— 1
aids distressed breathing. Sold by druggists
everywhere under our money-back guarantee
three convenient forms: ASTHMADOR
I powder, cigarettes or pipe mixture.
One of the best home ways to
6UIIO UP
RCO BiOOO
if you lack BLOOD-IRON
You girls and women who suffer so
from simple anemia that you're pale,
weak, "dragged out”—this may be due
to lack of blood-iron. So try Lydia ■.
Plnltham's TABLETS—one of the beet
home ways to build up red blood— ln
such cases. Plnkham's Tablets are one
of She greatest blood-iron tonics you
can buy! At aU drugstores.
Those occasional nights when ner
vous tension keeps you awake — are
you more wakeful the harder you try
to sleep? Those days when tense
nerves make you irritable and jumpy
—are you crankier and more restless
when you try to fight the feeling?
Miles Nervine can help you on days
and nights like these. It
has been making good
for more than 60 years. if*
CAUTION —use only y&il-lh.
as directed. Get Miles
Nervine at your drug KrftjjSi
store. Effervescent tab
-25c, sl. I

xml | txt