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The voice. (Cumberland, Md.) 1937-1938, November 17, 1938, Image 3

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Workers Education Becomes Important
Problem As Union Movement Continues |
Its Tremendous Onward March
Affiliated Schools for Workers Extends
Help to Unions and Plans
Educational Programs
Labor Inday finds itself the center t
of attention In the news on the a
radio. In the theatre—everywhere.
The tremendous itrowth of the trade
union movement in the past two or
three years, and tlie passatte of
new and Important labor legislation
has combined to bring this about.
A large pait of the unions' battle
for recognition has been won and
labor Is now an accepted and an
Incrcaslmt'y Important part of our
national life
Along with this new place In the
sun. labor Is faced with added re
sponsibilities. What do tlisc new
laws mean? How can I'bor take'
full lidvaniace of its opportunities
under this new legislation; make ll.s,
voice heard on minimum wage and
other boards' fight effectively for
higher standards? How can labor
hold the gains it has made along
organization lines; retain the loyal
ty and interest of Us membership
during periods of depression; draw
In new members. Allot these things
depend largely upon the intelligent
participation in the activities of the
union. This rails for a program of
workers' education built along mod
ern lines using new methods
A Problem
Every union evreutive today be
lieves in workers' education, m one
form or another The biggest prob
lem Is to find time lo set tip a pro
gram and se" that it Is earn'd out.
Some of the older unions and a
number of the newer organizations
have established separate workers'
education departments. But fre- <
qurntlv lark of funds holds a un- I
ion back. Often a union that sees <
the importance of an educational |
program, especially during ape- 1
riod of depression when organiza
tion activities are at a standstill. ,
finds Itself handicapped In this <
manner Offers of voluiueer help ;
and of cooperation from oilier j
agencies cannot be utilized because
of the inexperience of these nrganl- ,
zations in the field of workers' edu- ;
cation. The chief difficulty with the
union, however, is the question of
finding the time lo plan for and
earn out a program (
To help meet this situation
the Affiliated Schools for Work
ers. which has brrn working In
this field for a number of yrars.
'as set up several types of ed- ,
atlonai services, whirh arr
fillahle to unions. Too AffiW i,
-.Jed Schools was for some
vrars, as Its name implies, a
loose federation of its member
summrr schools of which Ibrrr
are now five: The Bryn Mawr
Summer School. The School for
Workers at the l Tiiverxitv of
Wisconsin. The Southern Sum
mer School, Tlie Pacific School
for Workers and The Summer
School for Office Workers. Four
of the live schools arc ro-cd
iicational.
Affiliated Schools
Tlie affiliated Schools still works
closely with Its member schools but
more and more of its time and en
ergy and funds go into its Labor
Education Service Tills service is
varied and lias been extended to
more than 100 unictus and m the
ease of one International union to
38 locals, ft may take the form of
help in setting up a regional con
ference where several organization*
feel a need for the stimulation of
an exchange of ideas on such sub
pects as new organizing methods
lor iastance. or Social Security Leg
islation. the new Federal Wage* and
Hours. BUI, or any one of a dozen
different subjects of Interest to la
bor. Or it may be the educational
department of a union needs as
sistance in rounding up teachers for
local classes, as one big Internation
al union did for its locals all the
way from the Pacific Coast to New
England I lie traveling library of
the Affiliat'd Schools Is in more or
less constant demand, particularly
from isolated communities where
(lie shelves of the local library are
strangely minus books on labor sub
jects
Unions arc continually asking
"What hall we read? We cant
get tin crested In heavy books on
economics. What about novels and
labor plays? Can't you tell us
Where to gel pamphlets written in
popular style -easy to read?" The
' answer to most of these questions is
to be found m the publication of
the All 1.1 a ted .Schools. Those ln-
SSTED READING
OF NOVELS. PLAYS. Bl-
UArmiiS AND POETRY deal
ill;; with social and economic prob
lems; a newly compiled LIST OF
LABOR PLAYS; and most recently
of all. a new annotated lust of
PAMPHLET MATERIAL FOR
WORKERS CLASSES In
lo those lists the Affiliated Schools
has pifullxhed its own pamphlets
on IABOR DRAMA. AN INTRO
DUCTION TO AMERICAN TRADE
UN I O SISM. T EACHING ECO
NOMICS IN WORKERS CLASSES
and others.
Plays Amt Skits
A miner from the northwest .
writes: “We have about two |
thousand new members who
have hail no previous union e\- |
perlenee. They don't know what J
it is all about and they ran't lie
gotten out lo conventional j
workers' elas-rs. A group of us
have decided to try a series of
programs comprising workers'
plays, skits, songs and trn In ‘
fifteen minute talks. (on you
give us any suggstions that will
help In reach these people?"
Here. again. the Affiliated
Schools rtiers its list of labor
lays which have been used ef
fectively by amateur labor ,
groups in various parts of thr
country and its SCRAPBOOK
NO. A giving some Illustrations
of new activities for workers' i
groups. Two ether publications <
are about ready for the printer, |
one which includes stories of
workers' education activities
carried on bv unions in connrr
tlrn with their general program
of work, surh as tlie legislator ,
program of the Rubber Work- i
ers Ihe anti-s>phillis crusade of
Hie Hosiery Workers and the
health program of the Textile
Workers. The second one is a
p'rnlar version of It’ll AT A
UNION IS AND WHAT IT
DOES.
Requests lor help from imlnius are i
coming to the Affiliated Schools In
Increasing numbers resulting in an '
expansion and development of its i
program to meet the needs of the
labor movement.
Get the secretary ot your local 1
union to write to the Affiliated ;
Schools for Workers at 302 East ,
35th Street for its new .leaflet tell
ing you how your union may Join I
the growing ||„t of organizations
utilizing Its Labor Education Serv
ice
ATTENTION EMPLOYERS:
The [Miroll tax returns, required
under Title VIII of the Social Se
curity Act, is not complete unless
It bears the social security account
number of each employe listed. .
Tlie account number, as well as the
, name, of each employe covered by
the law must appear on the tax re- .
* uIiT. form known as SS-la.
PERHAPS
A doctor has got olf a good one
which will appeal to everyone wor
ried about highway crossings. He
savs:
"A foot on the brake is worth two
In Ihe grave." I
—— -
JUDGE HUSTER THANKS THE VOTERS
I wish hi express my sincere lluniks It> Ihe \ <>lers of
Washington, Allegany and (iarrclt (anilities lor Ihe
splendid support tfiven me on November N|h. in circl
ing me Associate of the I’ourlh Judicial (arcuil
of Maryland.
I assure you I shall make every effort lo meril the
confidence reposed in me.
Sincnrlii .
WILLIAM A. I lI’STKH
FOR YOUR PRINTING
WITH
UNION LABEL
CALL 812
BELL-CENTURY PRINTING CO.
R. MARVIN BFI.L. Mfr.
164 BF.DFOKI) STKFKT CT.MBKKI.AM), Ml).
TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION
LOCAL NO. 169 (C. 1.0.)
The following are placed on our unfair list:
GUY WILLIAMS JOE MILLER
CARRIE MILLER KEELEY LEWIS
Local /A7'/ Support Is Appreciated
, i Signed) Rl ltl. SLNUERLIN, Fin. Secy.
—— I
f
THE WESTERN MARYLAND VOICE OF INDUSTRIAL LABOR, THURSDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 17, 1938 1
By “Jiggs” Burns and Pershing Rohrer
Canes Overcome Grid Campaign
Meyersdale Nearing Final
Club 13-8 Stages Here {
Push Over Two Touchdown.* Allegany, Fort Hill Rest for i
In Last Half to Score Turkey Day Clash—La-
Fifth Victory Salle Faces Kevser
__ \
Coming back in the .-ocond halt
afier a disastrous first half. Cum
berland's Hurricanes shoved over a
touchdown in each the third and ,
fourth periods to defeat tlie Mcy- .
arsdale Firemen. 13-8. Sunday at
Community park in a hard fought
battle
1
The Peniisv team, defeated lasi
season by the Canes tiere by a 6-0
core, had revenge until mid-wav ,
in the third session when ihe Canes 1
began a drive that was climaxed 1
with a 30-yard touchdown net ml. ■
Lawrence Males lo Tommy Smith
A pass for the point failed
Al Hie outset of the la*t period
ilie local elev'n recovered a fum
bled kirk on the Meyersdale 29- I
••ard ribbon and scored again Pil
lowing a sustained drive Elmo
Biggs tallied the touchdown
Thompson, huge left tackle of the
Canes, place-kicked flic point.
After the Canes' second touch
down. the Firemen- went to tlie aii
lanes and scored when Grolt look
a long pass in Ihe end zone toi
a touchdown A kick for the point
failed
The Firemen lion kicked off to
the Co lies and when Snowden
fumbled the ,-lippery oval. Die ball
lolled down to tlie Canes’ 6-vard
line where they recovered. Only 40
seconds remained In the game anil
the Canes used these lip by wasting
two running plays
A fumble by Tommy Smith, of
the Canes. In the second quarter
resulted In a safety for Meyersdale
and sent them off to a 2-0 lead in
the game. The safety came when
Smith went bark in the end zone
•to punt but fumbled a bad pa-ss
[from center and the melon rolled
out of the end zone.
Most of the contest was played
| ln a drizzling rain which made
looting heavy and slow. The win
iwas the fifth of the year for the
'jCanea against one defeat and a
I scoreless tie.
City high i Ikhils lagan the last j
lap of Ihe 1938 football season with J
the inmplilioii ol last weeks tilts j
in which two local outfits were (
tnmneed Gnh Thanksgiving Dai .
cl i ic remain on the schoolboy
schedule.
Allegany, tapered off lor its Tur- i
key U.iv tussle with tlie Fort Hill ■,
Sentinels by resorting in two long
run- and a quick thrust to outclas* j
M.irtinsburg. Bulldogs last Satur- ,
ii.il in the stadium. 19 to 0 to all .•
but rhnrh tlie c V A l. crown ;
Only a win over thr Hdltoppers Is j
all tin Blue and White ricldcr nerd (
to salt away the C V A L and
the eitv titles '
Jim Gaffney the Blue and White I
tefiar tullbaek. o'diaii Die Builder !
player on two ncru .mu, tn reel'lei i
touchdowns. He took a punt In the '
.second tanza and .-'leaked 90 yardsi
and then duplicated the feat in the
third .session, this time for 08 yards.l
A quick kick by Gaffney In the
second period that sailed from the
Allegany 21 to the Martin-burg 12
gave the West Bidets a break Aft -r
the Bulldogs relumed the boot.
Gaffney and Kenil) ate up the ,
yardage until Gaffney went out
wide around hi own lost end for six
■ aids and a touchdown
Meanwhile Fori H|ir. haplcs
Sentinels at- orbed a 34-0 rrusbin"
at Die lnind.- of f!:-*iei'stown's M*-
mon and Orav eleven It w S tic
fourth straight game in which th ■
Sentinels failed to score They
were blanked bv Handley. 40-0, ami
Martin-burg. 0-0. and placed a
stalemate against LaSalle.
LaSalle, still seeking its first vlr
torv of the year, will wind up with
a Turkey Dai morning game with
Kevser high In the West Virginia
town. The Blue and Gold aggre
gation. with a revamped lineup
held Calvert Hall's not so strong
Cardinals to an 18-0 score Armis
tice dav Two of the six-pointer
were the results of long dashes
one of them on an intercepted for
ward pas*.
Kevser. which won the Potomac
• FORD’S •
Your
Prescription
Druggists
CUMBERLAND
AND
FROSTBURG
Shop At
RAYMOND HANNA
SERVICE STATION
h i: cream, soft drinks
LUNCHES
Frostburg, Maryland
Phone 152
■ ■ -
|
Vall< v conference with live straight
Victories, will or out to take the
edge on Cumberland elevens foi
the o ason 'I lie. lust lo Allegany
20-fi Out defeated Fort Hill by the
same count.
Celanese To Face
Baltimore Club
Celanese Sorer Club, ot the
Western Maryland Soccer league,
will lace the Marsteln Soccer club
Sunday at Community Park Frost
burg. in the fir.' round of National
Amateur Cup p.iv The Marsteln
outfit i.. deadlock'd for first plate
with Lou .Snutli Soccer club In
the Monumental Division ol Die
Greater Baltimore league Marstem
ha. tailed 24 goals m six games
ugaiast their opponents' lour
I ast Sunday, m a Western Mary
land Soccer league game, the Cel
an -e team edged out Barton,
sponsored by the Celanese Local
1874. :-n at Barton in a hard
lough! game to maintain then hold
on first place.
In the other league game staged.
We ternport swamped Die South
End Boosters team. 9-1. ns Lonnie
Marsh hooted four goals. The fifth
member of Die circuit. Williamsport,
was idle,
I
GOOD WORK
- Mrs. Sailor: Does your fms
band’s reducing diet really work?"
Mrs Marine 111 say It does
Tlie battleship he hud tauoed on nis
chest now looks like a Hudson r*ver
tug "
Real Competitive
Heaithful Sport
m
Hwill**
Bowl and Meet
Your Friend at
CLUB RECREATION
34 X. .Mechanic Street
I ndrrnr..th < rlinftr t nion
llr adquarlrr*
P J. STAKU.M. frop.
* ]
B 1 ;.il < hr- •hrmiim* my\
flu • A.so '
p- .tip*.; s r r* Lai f v
• h!f arrMiigrtiie: • and
bouquets. Order now. .\\
BOPP'S
FLOWER SHOP
75 Baltimore Street
Phone 2.582 Open Evenings
JEiaUiuJLBUSaUi
~
FRED B. DRISCOLL
THE
WEST SIDE BARBER SHor
IA7 South Johnston St.
Cumberland
Parrot Beer Garden
UNION BAR
700 NORTH MECHANIC ST.
Phone 2996 Morris Kline
FOR FLOWERS
SEE
HABEEB
26 North Mechanic Street
David hubinsk). president of the
International Ladies Garment
Workers I'nion. whose Exerutivf
Hoard lasi week voted to abstain
from affiliation with the permanent
body now being formed by the ( .
I. O. Ihe action was not a surprise
in labor rlrclrs.
* 5
ft jft
*. I*'
S> . Tins sort of o present reaches '*s
| the recipient not once, but again t£i> *
f * and again throughout the .cor. ~3A
i How can one moke SI 00 **
! \^T~~"—,. * ; |
2 &?//</ Vow;* Magazine ami
Si Newspaper Subscription to V.
1 The VOICE oi LABOR s
% it
| At the Regular Advertised Price |
£ And The Voice Of Labor Will Be Sent To The
* v.
2 Same Or Another Address For The Same
Length Of Time Without Additional Cost. 2
;* |
5 OUR MAGAZINE CLUB AGENCY %
*•• \ n.iblr*. us to meet an\ other legitimate offer for senarate magazine*, or in rluhs. and ft,
at the same timr include our pa nr r without r\tra charge.
'ft ■ -- - -■- ■ ■■ ■■■— v +
1 A FEW OF OUR OFFERS I
2 TO THE SAME OR DIFFERENT ADDRESSES *
Jh P pulor Mechanics, Publisher's Price 1 vear 82.50 v oice Cf Labor, reg
s ular price 1 year_S|.oo BOTH FOR 82.50 2
Woman's Home Companion and Collier's Weekly, 1 sea- 52.75 Voice of
Labor, I N ear S|.oo ALL THREE FOR 82.75 j*
*■• Screenland and Silver Screen, 1 veer S2.no With Voice of Labor mclud-
S. ed 52.00 *
JA Jack and Jill and Womon s World, 1 year 82.50 These two mogezmes
W and Voice of Labor 52.50
Better Homes and Garden w<th American Bos, 1 year 52.00 Voice of Labor *
,V- included at the same price
Christian Herald, I seor 52.00 With Voce of Labor same price ifc
SI Etude 1 vear 52.00 With Voice of Labor 52.00 sjp
Jb Hsgcia Health Magczme 1 sear 52.50 W ith Voice of Labor 52.50
McCall’s Magazine and Rcdbook 1 sear 53.00 With Voice of Labor
6 83.00 L 2
Outdoor Lite 1 veor 51.50 With Voice of Labor K 1.50 **
2
5 ORDER NOW FOR CHRISTMAS GIFTS
VOICE OF LABOR, FOr S*
k Liberty Trust Bldg. Booklet
S. Cumberland, Md. * g*
Si How To
A Enrlosrd vou will find S—— (or nhtfh pie... nd hf following
s#s magailnrs: s#¥t
* Money J
Nome Magazine Time
2 Send To Po *' oWce Magazines
Name Magazine'. Time Anri
* .; illll*
2 Send To Post Office Newspapers
■fly Name Magazine Time w. fittl
2‘ Send To Post Office Furnish ’•A
Jh Sender 2
Periodical 2
Address Si
FIRM SIGNS i n ‘\m\ this week when the mau-
Rfmrnt signed a cloned (.hop con-
Nrw Voik.—A Mrlkf at the Decca J|(tt wlt j, tl)e Electrical. Ra-
Record Co . makers of hot jazr, rec- dlo and Machine Worker*. CIO.
To The Voters of Allegany County:—
I kratefully acknowledge the confidence placed In me by the
voters of Maryland
Realizing the voters of Allegany county g'e me a majority ol
ner 3 000 makes It difficult for me to find words in which to
adequately express myself
Through the year: the people of Allegany county have been
extremely kind to me In five state-wide elections Democrats and
Republicans alike nave carried Allegany county for me The people
here made it possible for me to become a state candidate
Tru'v, I am grateful.
JAMES A. YOUNG
I
i Clerk of the Morylond
Court of Appeals
r
Three

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