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Maryland suffrage news. (Baltimore, Md.) 1912-1920, October 16, 1920, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060379/1920-10-16/ed-1/seq-7/

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PART OF SPEECH BY MARY FENNIMORE SHEPPARD
AT THE JUBILEE GIVEN BY THE SUDLERS
VILLE JUST GOVERNMENT LEAGUE AT
COX HALL, SUDLERSVILLE
“Gentlemen : We are here—no longer a theory, but a condition forced
upon you by men of other States. It is amusing how we are greeted —by
some because they know that to avoid us now means to meet us later on,
by some from a sense of chivalry, and by many in an effort to save
their own hides. As a representative of the Just Government League,
Maryland branch of the National Woman’s Party, I wish to state that we
are strictly non-partisan in policy, and hold that by that method we can
compel the leaders of the two predominating parties to put up better men
and some women for office.
“It’s easy to line up. I could have done so had I chosen the channel of
least resistance, but this is not understood by women who have not given
of their time, their energy and of their purse, but those who have worked
and have given realize what those 72 years of unjust criticism and tradition
mean, and that it cost nearly $1,000,000 for this privilege of voting in the
land of the free. We have higher motives for our ballot than merely in
creasing the work of the election officials. We want an effective ballot,
and now is the time for women to come forward and do their part.”
Then followed a list on “Why Women Should Vote.” Mrs. A. M.
Brown of Church Hill followed Mrs. Sheppard and made a strong plea for
patriotism in the use of the ballot and for better conditions for women,
children and the home.
Mr. Goldsborough of Denton addressed the League.
Cox Hall was beautifully decorated with Red, White and Blue and
Purple, White and Gold. Music was furnished by Mrs. Morgan.
To Miss Ella Roberts, president of the Sudlersville branch, and Mrs.
Austin Roberts belongs the honor of organizing the oldest Equal Suffrage
League in Queen Anne’s county.
Noticeable among the group was Miss Catherine Brown of Centerville,
also one of the first advocates of equal suffrage in Queen Anne’s county.
JUST HEARSAY
THEY SAY:
“Junket” has a new meaning to women voters now. It used to mean
just sour milk.
THEY SAY:
The Sun keeps a headline set up for everyday use: “Mrs. (former
anti) urges women to vote.” All they do is change the name.
THEY SAY:
That some women are going to prove that Jonwalter was right when
he said they had not the sense to vote. How? By casting their ballots
for his election!
THEY SAY—
The Democratic organization has put the handsomest frame around
that motto hanging in their headquarters: “A dog, a woman and a walnut
tree —the more you beat them the better they be.”
THEY SAY—
The antis are just determined to vote for the men who tried to keep
them from getting the ballot—just to pay them back in their own coin.
THEY SAY:
That Jonwalter now claims he never was an anti. Wonder if he has
been reincarnated?
Madame Grundy.
(Continued from page 227)
sentiment, without connection with the peace, * * * it will fall of
itself, and there will be lost a great opportunity to advance the world.”
Next week we will continue the discussion of the covenant, taking up
the means by which peace will be maintained and international co-opera
tion promoted by the League and what it is now doing along these lines.
For we must remember that in spite of America’s absence, the League of
Nations is a going concern.
MARY LAND SUFFRAGE NEWS
Mention the Maryland Suffrage News When Patronizing Our Advertisers.
NATIONAL WOMAN'S PARTY CONVENTION
WITH the date of the National Woman’s Party convention set for
approximately the middle of December, the accrediting of dele
gates already has begun.
Miss Sheldon Jackson of Washington, District of Columbia chairman
of the Woman’s Party, has been appointed chairman of the national cre
dentials committee for the convention. She will appoint one member from
each State to act on her committee, and already has begun the work of
sending out credential blanks to State chairmen. Representation of each
State will be based upon membership, one delgate representing each 50
paid members.
Maryland is entitled to the largest number of delegates, then New
York, California, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Colorado and the District of Co
lumbia in the order named. Only two States, Kentucky and Alabama, will
send but one delegate.
In addition to the regularly accredited delegates, it is expected that
many members of the Woman’s Party and all State chairmen will attend
the convention.
The widespread interest in the convention and its outcome is indicated
by the hundreds of letters received daily at national headquarters of the
party urging that the organization should not disband. Correspondence
is coming not only from all parts of the United States, but from Hawaii
and from members abroad. It is planned to invite representatives of all
large women’s organizations to attend the convention as speakers.
The first day of the four-day convention will be devoted to a memorial
celebration, probably in the Capitol, in honor of the pioneers in the suffrage
movement. Marble statues of Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott and Eliz
abeth Cady Stanton will be presented to the Capitol by the Woman’s
Party. Mrs. Harriot Stanton Blatch has been made chairman of arrange
ments for the celebration.
The second day of the convention will be given over to reports on the
seven years’ work of the Woman’s Party. The third day the convention
will take up consideration of the various fields of work now being covered
by women’s organizations in this country, with the idea of avoiding dupli
cation of their activities in the event of continuance.
On the fourth day the convention will decide whether the party shall
continue or disband, and determine upon the future policy in case the
organization is to go on as a separate political group, working to abolish
discriminations still existing against women.
C. & P. Phone, St. Paul 5972.
Rollman & Schloss
Advertising Printers
125-127-129 W. PRATT STREET
Baltimore, Md.
Hopper, McGaw & Co.
Importers and Grocers
344 and 346 N. Charles St.
BALTIMORE, MD.
Fleet-McGinley Co.
PRINTERS
SOUTH & WATER STREETS
THE ALPHA
PHOTO ENGRAVING COMPANY
ARTISTS ENGRAVERS
Js&yasrrja&r
.ACC
* 6 T/MOfZG,M*JZyi>A rvn ,
Kent County’s Canning
Kitchen to the Careful
Consumer
We always grow what we can and you eat
what you can and then grow
Specialties
Stringless Beans Blackberry Jam
Com and Tomatoes
Fancy Hand-Packed Tomatoes
All goods picked and packed under
careful personal inspection.
All workers and all work done under
my roof, under the most sanitary con
ditions.
To introduce my brand, will sell for
a few months at the following prices, de
livered, if 6 cases are ordered:
Hand-packed Tomatoes, No. 2 cans, 24 in case $3.00 ca.
Hand-packed Tomatoes, gal. cans, 6in case 3.00 ca.
Hand-packed Peaches, gal. cans, 6 in case 6.00 ca.
Hand-packed Peaches, No. 2 cans, 24 in case 7.00 ca.
Combination Corn & Tomatoes, No. 2 cans, 24
in case 3.50 ca
All cans sterilized in live steam before packing
Mrs. A. L. Harris
Howell’s Point Farm
BETTERTON, MD.
231

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