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Maryland suffrage news. (Baltimore, Md.) 1912-1920, October 23, 1920, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89060379/1920-10-23/ed-1/seq-4/

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JAMES M. COX, the Democratic candidate for the Presidency, was a member of the House of Representatives from March 4, 1909, to
January 8, 1913. He then resigned to become Governor of Ohio. That period was comparatively unimportant. The issues of those ses
sions bear little relation to the problems now before the nation. Cox’s Congressional record, therefore, is comparatively brief and does not con
clusively indicate what might be expected of him as President. It is here presented, however, from official sources.
Cox’s Bills
During his four years in the House Cox introduced 924 bills, of which
919 were pension, relief or local measures. In this list are included two
general pension measures, one providing for the grant of service pensions,
the other for determining the length of service of soldiers in the Civil
War.
Of Cox’s five public bills, two dealt with important questions of social
welfare. One proposed the creation of a committee to inquire into the
advisability of old-age civil pensions. The other prohibited child labor
in the District of Columbia.
A third bill provided for the making of trade agreements with foreign
countries.
The two remaining measures were designed (1) to distribute the
Treasury surplus for road improvement and (2) to prevent flag dese
cration.
A summary of the bills by sessions follows :
Sixty-first Congress —First Session.
Pensions 37
Remove charge of desertion 3
Public buildings 2
Preserve site of Fort Hamilton 1
Total 43
Sixty-first Congress —Second Session.
Pensions 257
Remove charge of desertion to
Relief of individuals 11
Buildings 1
Determine soldiers’ length of service 1
Trade agreements 1
Old-age pensions t
Total 282
Sixty-first Congress —Third Session.
Pensions 102
Remove charge of desertion 6
Relief 4
Total 112
Sixty-second Congress —First Session.
Pensions 39^
Relief 1
Service pensions t
Total 398
Sixty-second Congress —Second Session.
Pensions 73
Remove charge of desertion 2
Relief 6
Buildings 2
Restore to active list of army 1
Child labor in District 1
Hopper, McGaw & Co.
Importers and Grocers
344 and 346 N. Charles St.
BALTIMORE, MD.
MARYLAND SUFFRAGE NEWS
CANDIDA TE COX AS CONGRESSMAN
By Lynn Haines and Henry Raymond Mussey.
C. St P. Phone, St. Paul 5972.
Rollman & Schloss
Advertising Printers
125-127-129 W. PRATT STREET
Baltimore, Md.
Mention the Maryland Suffrage News When Patronizing Our Advertisers.
Flag desecration t
Distribute surplus for roads i
Total 87
Sixty-second Congress —Third Session.
Pensions i
Buildings i
Total 2
Summary.
Pensions 866
Remove charge of desertion 21
Relief 22
Buildings 6
General pension measures 2
Restore to army active list 1
Preserve fort site 1
Old-age pensions 1
Child labor in District 1
Trade agreements 1
Distribute surplus for roads 1
Flag desecration 1
Total 924
It should be noted that bills for removing charges of desertion usually
arise in connection with pension claims that have been disallowed.
In addition, Cox offered three amendments worth noting:
(1) Increasing the food allowance in soldiers’ homes.
(2) Prohibiting the serving of oleomargarine in soldiers’ homes.
(3) Establishing a weather service in Dayton.
The most striking feature of this list is, of course, the preponderance
of pension, private and local bills.
Cox’s Speeches
Cox’s service in Congress ended at the beginning of 1913. On such
recent issues as the railroad question, current tax problems, prohibition
and suffrage, his Congressional record therefore throws little light. His
speeches do, however, give some intimations of his general position on
many questions of current interest.
In general, they suggest the facile politician inclined to an interest in
progressive policies. They are evidently addressed largely to “the folks
back home.” Hence in a speech on conservation, for example (August
11, 1911; C. R., 3855), we find praise of the initiative and referendum;
in a speech on the parcel post (April 30, 1912; C. R., Appendix, 254), a
discussion of good roads and convict labor.
Cox gave more attention, perhaps, to the question of food in soldiers’
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