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The Goodhue volunteer. (Red Wing, Goodhue County, Minn.) 1861-1864, February 17, 1864, Image 1

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064562/1864-02-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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Wit Wulmitti.
P)pi|^!^EKfiVElt\r WEDNESDAY,
BY
A E S A E
a a or SL'BSOUIPTION §1,50 per annum,
tiortly in advance.
KJVFI3.4 oi- MVEHtlSIN G.
25T" r*m lines or lessmake a square.
If eoL.j S tt«»
vT»T". I T:J Oil 75 00
LiftAi. Ao,t^iiTt8EsiENjs,4(lcts. per squr.for
•rat I n*»f tto* ,85 cts. caehsubacnuentinscrtion.
Btmness Cards, (six linos,) $6 per year,
^ty *4virtUenvent8 continued until ordered
A.MBS II. l'AUKR
W A E N BRISTOL,
«. X^a-xtr,
RKD WINCM MINN.
Pront otlioc, over C. McGlashan's Store.
13v7
\V. W. PHELPS,
A O E A A W
KBDW1NG, MINNESOTA
Sly
0. & J. O. xMcCLURE,
A X. a a
fiED WING, MINNESOTA.
•Spjoiul :ittonti«5i ivcri to the collection of
claims ajjaiusttho Dnitod States Tor PAY AN
KOUN 1' of soldiers killed iu battle or dyyig
the service of the Government.
O.Iiee in Brand's new building, next door to
I lie Uod Wing House.
U«d Wing, March 9th,lS61. tf
JAMES II. PARKER,
A TTO A7 0 Utfi EL 0 A TLA W.
Ami Notary
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
Particular attention eivon to the collection
claim* ugainsttlie United States,growiiiffoulofj
th iV-.i,r, t-ir s(ddicrs AKKEAK I-AV, BOUNTY MON
KV, KxVttA. PAYOI: PENSION*.
Ol'Ko'niThe Goodhue Volunteer building
A N IVES
A O Jl 12 A A W
A S
JUSTICE Ob' TUB PEACE.
11*J W Minnesota
Special attention given to collecting.
OFFICE ON' MAIN STREET.
in cTtHI 11 usE.
W* havetmtne .vly furnished and openedthe
Hickman House, formerly known imtho Hack
is 1»MJI S I W lt*'J in and
are IMW pro oared to accommodate all who may
ts»vor as with their patrouage.
Wo hi^vejustbui.t
A. COM.HDIHOIJS S A E
to a to
Hod Wing, May tr». ISfi-i.
E
A_'i'^}-
IsiLLY HOUSE.
2Jl3[lXGli rhiVi Proprietor,
flam Street, between, Main and Third Stmt*,
IIKP WING, MINNESOTA..
N ha* bfjcn nov.ly fitted nnd furn
uhol. anl is but two squares trom the
ito»mho*tLanlirig. A cood Stable is con
fc»oW.t With tin house. BaiZitftL'o conveyed to
Und trom the boats free gfoh*rgO. [vSi-My
Ba Ore^k House.
O I milesfrom Red Wihg.on thcZumbrota
O road. Good aeeommodationa for both man
%nd beast at reasonable rates.
JOHN PACK, Proprietor.
-«BoblIDE COUNTY
aastTTG- O
A. ^. CLARK,
Wholesale and retail dealer in
I lil^GS A N E I I N E S
O I OT.AS9, VABMI8HKS,
•bt/e-Stufclfairancl Cloth Brushes
tATENT MEDICINES,FANCY SOAP,
VOBACCO, »»cr*
PerfnmoTy, Bedand White a in Palnt,&c
fK|.» B«p Wjjto, Mi*Mor
l.jNU
n-tlv6:ly
Drag Book Store,
Dr. A. H. JONES,
DEALER
in Druffs, XoJieinM:Toilcl SrU.
cU», School, Medical, and Mi«c«lUneou*
Book*, Periodicals- Blanks, FancyUoods,Pho
tograph Album*, Wall Paper* A &••
Prueriptiom Carefully Prepared.
8*4 Wing, Deo .a, i*S2. vTnl»ly
NOTICE
0 THE PUBLIC!
TbTMbeetitar kaa watted the
Ohillson Souse,
£**m*tlwKwie. A gemrai imitation
CiTaatojfrrailailAaK
sltWy
FOR SALE.
TEN
UDMBKK WAWM W
WONN&S WARB, Cieckery and Stone
I Wara.ieaeieby J*ARLAN*Ca
X***8**0tt *T "miW co.
H4MEINE UNIVERSITY,
RED: WING, MINNESOTA.
CALENDAR—2fa« &«», Sept. 3, 1863. Winter
term, Dec. 3,1S63. Spring te)tn, March 16,1864.
Fall term of 1864, Sept. 7. Winter term of 1S64,
December 7.'
Send for a Catalogue. Letters of inquiry
promptly answered.
Rsv.. JABEZ BROOKS, A. M.,
nlOvStf President.
O N LINDQTJIST,
DEALER IN ,','L
Groceries, Boots and Shoes,
CROCKERY & WOODENWARE,
Segars& Tobacco^ Wines Liquors,
YANKEE NOTIONS, &C,
Main Street, Red Wing, Minn. [n2m6
DANIELS, HOWE, & CO.,
Manufacturers of.and dealers in every v»
riety of
LUMBER, LATHS!
Shing.es, Pickets, &c.
DRY FINISHING LUMBER
jrnd Dressed
S id etorxcl. a
Always on hand at the Bluff Mills.
n86v6:ly
C0GEL & BETCHER,
Manufacturers of and dealers in
Lumber, Shingles,
AND LATH,
SASH. DOOP.S & 3LI2TDO.
OHlce and Lumberyard
Cornpr of Main nn«i Brond Streets.
SAWING, PLANING, MATCHING,
AND
Done to order at our Steam Mill.
"*ftl Nov. 13,'., -ly
G-. R. ST^RLiNG^C^T,
Siicocjaors to S. B. Fogt,
Wholesale and Iictuil Dealers in
LEATHER, & SHOE FINDINGS'
Manufacturers ot evey kind and style Of
Men's, Hoy's, Women's and Children's Hoot*
nnd Shoe*.
Reparing done neatly and at moderate
prices. In the Xow Brick building, corner
Main and Plumstrcets. Coins andr.ee us.
O. R. STERLING* CO.
n2f)a id
W A SlAlifc'fl A N E W E E
Main M. West *f Bush near the P. O.
Ito.l Win ?, Minnesota
WATCHES
*J (D U--i j,
ALSO
neatly repaired.
f^ThcRnb-cribe has served a regular ap
prenticeship in Europe, and is confident of l'o
ing able to give perfect satisfaction.
A. W.ESPLNG.
ALL WORK. WARRANTED.
nf3
nllvG-yl
I S E S
Now Photograph & Ambrotype
Oier £. L. Baler's Hardware Store, Ifain Street,
RED WING, MINN.
AM ROT PES,
MELAN'OTYPRS,
PHOTOGRAPHS AND
CARTES DE VISITE,
An 1 all Pictures known to the art, taken as
well in cloudy us fair weather.except children
which require sun HghtA My Pictures are sec
ond to n»nc in the country. Call and see for
yourselves, I have a fine lot of Stcrescopic
views which will well repay a visit to my
Gallery. All work warranted to suit or
noslack
charge. Instructions given in the Art.
PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.
GEOSGE FISHER.
Juno 80, 13t3. v7n49tf
THE CELEBRATED
BASLE
W I N O I I
Manufactured and for sale by
ASUTON,COOEL & BETCHER,
Near the Kelly House,
RED WING, MINNESOTA.
n98 nl5v6:lv
Grocery & Provision
S O E
S. C. HARLAN 4* Co.
Weather*?'* OM Store Street,
RED WING, MISTS.
JOM* ROBQUtST.
MERCHANT TAILOR.
And MannJkeiarer of all kinds of
CLOTH AND FUR COATS,
and dealer ia
Ready Made Clothing,
BUSH STREET, E WIWG. Mlftlf.
HEMP
and CANAST SKtib for by
HARLAN A CO.
A E S
Lame*
Fie-Kic,
aad Soda Crackers,fort*X» by
I S. C. BARLAX A CO
--—r
S
*,
MuM fggjtj
THtE SEASONS-!
The glories of summei and autitmn are. .iled
And winter, stern winter, has reared its irk
head .-....'
December is here and will quickly be p^st,
And another short year is nnishngi fast.
Another 6hortyear oh the sourd of its wing
To my bosom some heart-searching questions
should bring
Have I Bought or the Lord? Do I walk in
his ways? ».
And m.v thoughts, are theyhallowedby pray
er and by praise
The days.of the years of r.- i«/e sr*53fii.-ftway
May I car'aubiiy liibt.i- whiic^et itisfla^f,
And, knowing that life must scon, come to andered
enJ,
Look to Christ as my Savior, my Lord, and!Jor
A DrHtiil Murder.
Correspondence Saint Paul Pre*.-*.
Wash for Bctldtngs.
Take a clean barrel that will hold water
put into it half a bushel of quick lime, and
it by pouring over it boiling water,
sufficient to cover it four or five inches deep
stirring it until it is slacked.
Dissolve it with water and add two pounds of
sulphate ot zinc (white vitriol) and one
pound of common sal', which will cauae the
wash to harden on the wood work in a low
days add sufficiency ef water to bring it tobig
the consistency ef thick white wash.
To make the above wash of a pleseant
cream color add three peuncU of yellow
ochre.
For lawn color add four pounds umber,
one pound Indian red, and one pound of
lamp black.
For gray or stone color, add four pounds
raw umber and two pounds lams black.
The following is the formula for the white
wash used for theminor buildings connected
with the President's residence, at Washing
ton, D. O, both externally and internal.
SRack six pounds of lime in hot wateT
coveted firem tbeair. Pee* it through a
sieve :n a liquid state. Add one-qnarter of
peocd ef whiting or the aim* quantity*
pulverised bant alum. pound of white
three pennds of rice flour made into
E O N S I I O N A N N I O N I S A S A N A E I E
VOLUME 8, NO, 30 RED WING, GOODHUE COUNTY, MINN., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17, 1864, WHOLE NO. 460
^,-
A Years Woik of Rutnselleis.
Carefully compi'ed statistics show that
60,000 LIVES
are annually destroyed by intemperance in
the United States.
100,000 MEN AND WOMEN
are yearly sent to prison in consequence of
strong drink.
20.000 CHILDREN
are yearly sent to the pbor^house for the
amo reason.
300 MURDERS
are another of the yearly fruits of intern
perance.
400 SUICIDES
follow these fe.»rful catalogues of miseries,
200,000 ORPHANS
arc bequeathed each year"to private and
public charity.
$200,000,000!
are yearly expended to produce this shock
ing amount of crima and misery, and as
much more is lost from the same cause.
ITASCA.F cb. 5, 1864.
The effects of whiskey on the nervous
system have had a very good illustration in
•"a late case near here. An Irishman by theone
name of Dennis Ivalhar bought a homestead
claim near Princeton, last summer, and dur-
ing the past month has been moving his land preperations made for a grand outran
slock and family to occupy it. Three o?
his children he hud taken up and returned
with a horse and sleigh for his wife and two
other children. On his way up with them
he got pretty well intoxicated, and his wife
becoming somewhat uneasy in his company
got out ef the sleigh with her babe about
six weeks old, but he lefuscd to let her
take the other child out, and started on.—
The child commenced screaming for herfrom
mother, when the father, to quiet it, gave it
a blow with his list on the vide of the head.
The mother walked two miles and ahalf, to
the nearest house, and sent a younf man to
look after her drunken husband and child.
He found the horse loose lrom the sleigh.—
Going a quarter of a milo, ho came to theabout
sleigh with the little girl, four years of age,
dead, lying on the seat, with one side of her
head badly swclen and black and blue
probably from the effects of his blows. A
mile from this he found the father lying
dead drunk in the road. This is the story
as 1 have received it. The mother is a very
kind and bard working woman, and through
her good management they have been en
abled, within the past five years, to get a
pretty fair start, and their^rospects looked
very encouraging. The husband, when so
ber, has many good qualities.
pasto^snd ose poundofglue fjjgh celaeed.) capiure them.
Add five pounds of bsfliag water to the
whole mixture. Apply *o*oitothe out.
tide of tkobsildiafs.sadeoklew the inside.
One pint willeorerseaasre yard of oa*.
tide work.—Cswsfry tfrstfestaw.
COM BflC A E
a as a
my friend, have at last g)t them up, and you can bet
We are all glad of it. We have had a hard
jobofit, haaihg to draw bur logs 3 and 4:low
miles, with teanis that were hardly able to
drag themselves along. Our minature fort
covers a space of ground over 234 feet square
built of logs. We had a very severe tima
in getting here. We started from St.'An
thony with about 500 horses, 60 or 70
mules and along train of ox teams. Our
stock was compelled to go on half rations of
grain and hay from St. Anthony to George
town, and from there to Pembina, a dis
tance of 160 miles they received none. We
would turn them out, cut down trees andJ
brouse theru every night as the only resort
to keep them alive. But this failed, and
our horses and mules were strewn all along
the road. Wo had on our arrival here but
200 horses, and alike diminuation of the
rest of our stock. We were compeliad to
march on foot from Georgetown through
snow6 and 7 inciQ.s deep. We have now
fifty horses left
Pembina, in Dakota is situated on the
west bank of the R.d River and at the
mouth of the Pembina river. It is about
thirty miles from St. Jo., at the foot of theto
Pembina mountains, and seventy-five miles
Furt Girar, in the Selkiik settlement.
It is noied as a place of entrance, and an old
trading post. The Hudson Lay Co's., old
fort is about one and a half miles down the
Red river, where you can invest green banks
at 50 per cent discount.
.. ..-isa-*
PKMBINA, D. T. Jan. 16ih 1864.
FBIEND JAMES :—Having nothing to do
and quite comfortably situated to-day, I
thought I would sit down and write you a
few lines, deeming that a word from this re
mote region of the world would be of some
interest to you. Well, here we are at la»t,
I vuppo&t settled for the winter, but the Ma-ted
jor claims that we are still in the field. I
do not know what being in winter is, if
when a ebmmand has orders to build log
huts and mofe into them, is ^upt.- I in me-
When I started for Pembina expected
we were going to quite a smart place, that is
a village of some two or three hundred in
habitants, having heard, for j'ears, a great
deal said about it. You can imigaro our
3upprise, when wo arrived there, tofindon-rian.
ly three houses, one of them occupied by
Mr. Lemoy, U. S. Custom Houso officer,
occupied as a itoro and another by Capt.
Donaldson. When we got withing a few
rods of Pembina, wo were ordeied to halt
When wo were ordered forward, I kept on
the lookout, anJ never know that we had ar
iiv*i at our place of destination until told
so.
The inhabitants, who are sparcely settle^
here, are mostly French and Half
breeds, but there arc a few of all nations
mixed up with them. They seem to be
very steady and industrious. Wo have a
lot of them at work on the quartermaster
and hospital buildings, and find llum, very
handy in building log building?. They are
strict adherents to the Roman Catholic faith
and you can «ee their little chappel standing
out alone on the prairie, where they acsern
ble every Sunday. It is beyond a possibili
ty to get them to labor on the Sabbath,—
They are very clanish and eflectlonate, to
each other, and sometimes live three or four
families in a house. We are told that if a
man marries one of them, ho can count on
a thousand relation'*, who will call on himIndian
so oftei that it is impossible for a man to
lay up a cent. Stone is very scarce in this
country, in foot we have not seen a pie^
large enough to kill a bird. They have a
kind of clay that is very useful for building
purposes. It is as good as lime mortar for
plastering, and they build fire-places and
chimneys with nothing else. They have a
time during the holy days, singing and
dancing. But New Years is the day. It
is the custom to visit every one oh that day
and when a man goes into a house the wo
men and girls walk up and kiss him—he
must return it. They live by hunting and
farming (very little of the Litter) in the sum
mer, and trapping and trading in the
windon't
ter. They live mostly on Buffalo and elk
meat which they capture on the plains west
of here. Itisproeur.d in the summer and
dried for winter.
The climate is cold, dry and unchangea
ble, which makes it very healthy. Wo
have bad bat one foil of enow, and we still
have excellent sleighing.
We have hod bat two expenditures sisee
we arrived here. Shortly after OUT arrival
here Major Hatch learn1 that there was a
pssentef Sioux at St. Jo. He
immediately called for volunteers to go end
fle received ahoat oae asm*
deed Mlaateers. sad with the Battery star
to atsboataix P. for said camp- Whea cumforfreet-bittea Kasha.
we got to withta S mtfos of St we them when ammttaaiss was
baked sad seats snoot ia to aeecmia haw aWr to preserve life ho says a
thekmdk^aeretaraed at the
Sergeant of Co. A."
About three weeks ago, Major Hatch
heard again that there was a good chance to
gobble some of the natives, and accordingly
sent up 17 med in sledges to undertake. the
to put up qnarteas, and still the Ma learned that. the Indians were encamped
about 2 miles from town. Al dusk in the
evening led by a Chippewa Indian the ad
vanced to camp. They passed them in a
ravine sitting in their tents, probably
not dreaming of the impending danger.—
we are in the field* Wc
An old women, wounded ran out and cried
for our boys not to kill them, as there was
nobody but an old man and three squaws,
but to go over a hill not far distant, and
kill I: uians who had moved their camp that
day. The Lieut, in command ordered a
half breed Sioux with him to tell them to
como up. They came up crying and trem
bling to within a short distance when our
boys fiied and killed and scalped them.—
a me a to a
Lust- week 38 S JUX ctme i't camp and
surrendered themselves. They are in a pit
able condition. One chief froze to deaih
while coining in, and these are badiy frozen
They say that they do not Want to tigh
any more, that they got badiy punished last
summer. We expect a lot more in before
8pring.
There are a lot of Sioux down at Fort
Garry. They have killed all their dogs,
and very near all of their ponies. The
Governor has trie 1 to his utunst to get
them to leave, but to no avail.
mm.
reporting that they had decamped across the
lin\ but saw three buck* in' tdwn. The
5fajor sent 20 men forward, and marched
the rest of us home. Two days after the
illustrious 20 came back in with two of
their number wounded. -They captured two
Indians and in the excitement let them go
again. Our bdys were wounded by an exci-
°n double
quick, not careing to pay a visit to thocamp
The actors in the massacre felt very exul
tant over it, and ran exibiting around the
camp with the gray scales of these women
a man and boy.
The men in camp do not think so much of
it. They look upon it as very disgraceful
to the profession of arms. It may be wel]
to kill women and chi'dren but I do not
think it reflects much credit or honor upon
a ehrislian soldier to take their scalps. I
havs had opportunities, but thank God I
hrve not as far forget my christian training
as to place myself on a level with a barba
One old women. Little Sixes mother
lived after being wounded three times and
scalped to be carried to within 20 miles of
Fort Garry.
jf'Hutches Battalion is a heavy thing. It had
better be kept wbree it is for the credit ef
the Sta e, but I omit further comment.
Wc are having \ery pleasant weather—
wo never saw finer. The health of ths
Battalion is very good. Jean hilleo, 'Join
Little, Bennett boys and the rest of the
boys frttn Goodhue Co., are all well. The
boys are in fine spirits as they expect the
paymaster daily. Our Quartermaster fails
have any socks for the boys, which is
Very bad in this climate. We expect to be
on short allowance before spring.
W. G. A.
AT a factor/ in Portland* Main, nearly
1, 000 bushels of pototoes/tre "concentrated
for the army every day. All the water
issince.
absorbed, leaving about five pounds o! nu
triment to the sixty pounds, which a bushel
of potatoes averages, and that eoocentrtion
is ground up, giving it the appearance of
meal. It is cooked by returning the
water to it in a boiling state, and keeping it
hot from ten to fifteen minutes, when it
swells like larch and assumes the apearasce
of potato prepared for the table.
Josh Billings, the philanthropist beg*
leave to state
That onion? are jod for a had breath.
That Rockawa clams area good opon n*
for enny yong men.
The ships are lulled the bekos thay al way,
keep a man on the Wh-tut.
That turning water into wine E a mire
kle, in tne*e days werth at least three hun
dred per cent.
That boys aint aptoturn out well who
get up till 10 o'clock in tie rooming.
That if a man iz goingtomake bisoess
of serving the I/rd, be likes tu se* him da
it when he measures op anions ax well at
when he hellers glory hallyluyer.
Thai wisdom aint nothing more thes edi
ka'ed conning.
AgenUemaa, the other evening, object
od to playing etrds with a lady,, beesose
the hsd sack a winning way about her.
*OOw
Too whiskey doty—help yourself sad
am ths sottls.
of*
4 are aa isfcttafo
I hea restored
the Ciaetaastti Cummmitl.
Tus New iiampshire democrats have
nominated E. W. Harrington of Manchester
for Governor—an entirely new name in tbe
politics of that State.
IT is estimated that the cash donation to
the Great Western Sanitary Fair will
amount to $100,000, and that the articles
donated for sale will amount to as much
more*
THE Quincey Herald states that eight
thousand hogs are lying dead along the
Hannibal & St. Joe. Railroad as the result
of the recent storm and cold and obstruc
tton-of trains.
A the Sanitary Fair being held at Cin
cinnati!, is a cane cut from the tree under
whicu Gen. Grant and Pemberton arrang
ed the terms of the surrender of Vicksburg.
Rebel officers and soldiers in large num
bers have come into newbern, N. C, and
accepted the President's pardon.
Austria has followed the example of Eng.
land in definitely refusing to take any in
part the proposed Congress.
A waterfall has been found on tbe Lewis
fork of the Columbia river that is thirty
eight feet higher than Niagara,
A South Carolina paper says that if Gen.
Bragg were near the gates of heaven, and
invited in, at the critical moment he would
fall back.
There 13 a place in New Brunswick call
ed "Skedoddler's Ridge." It is were
some fifty cowards have gone to avoid wear
ing uniforms.
Both branches of the Legislature of West
ern Virginia have agreed to a bill calling a
convention for the aboli lion of slavery in
that State.
A young lady of Patterson, JS. J., on
Christmas day skated all the way from that
city to Newark and back a distance of 30
miles.
A lot of rebel prisoners spent the 3d
inst., at Layfaette, Ind. Among them was
an old mar, a Kentuckian, and singularly
enough one of the Union guard placed over
him was his own son. The old fellow pre
sumed to take liberties on tbat account, but
was promptly chacked by the other, who
addressed him as a "d—d old rebel
The most extensive coal field in the
world, commence'* neaj Cftrrollton, Kentuc
ky, and runs north through Indiana. Illino
is and Iowa, conjoining about eighty thou
sand square miles, of which a tenth part or
eight thousand square miles, is rti Indiana.
John S. Barbour, Prosidont of the Orango
and Alexandria railroad—one of the most
prominent men who aided the rebellion at
the first irrVirginia, has written a letter
(hat he does not believe the South can hold
out -yond spring.
It is Miate.l at Washington that there are
now 60,000 negro troops in the Federal
service—that as many more Africans are
onnectcd with the army in non combatent
positions—and that the rebels have, so far,
|Ost about five hundred thousand slaves.
The Southern Methodist Book Concern
in Nashville his been taken by tho civil au
thorities for a government printing office.
It was a pestilent secession concern, and
has now been put to good use.
Insanity is alarmly prevalent in the army
induced by exposure. Twenty-five insane
soldiers were sent to Cincinnati a few days
The receipts of the Sanitary Fair at Cin
cinnati! are estimated at $340,000.
The notorious Col. CI uke, one of Mor
gan's officers, dtcd Johnson's Island on
Wednesday, of strangulator, cause by an
ulcerated throat.
The grand scope of the true Christton
ministry is to bring men borne to Christ.
—JiobsitBalf.
The coffee crop in Costa Rica will be heavy
tbi* year.
Eastern capitalists are buying immense
tracts of land in Michigan. One New
York company has invested $600,000.
Mrs. Sarah Walters died at Hoesick
Falls, Eenseelar county, a few days since
at the age of one hundred and one year*.
At a grand wood procession at Spring
field, Ohio, a few days ago, the patriotic for*
mere delivered 140 cords to the soldiers'
fiuniliee.
The estimate of the bureau of Internal
Revenue of the annual manufacture of
whiskey ia the country is 100,000,000 gal
leas.
The receipts of tho American Tract So
cietyforthe last fiscal year wore $2i 1,000,
Wing soarty $e0,000 ia adveace of too pro
vioosyesr.
The sxfitaatrd strength of tho Federal ar
myfortho easaisf yeai, iftdodtag regulars
volunteer sad drafted men,» 9Z7. 60S of
las awry, fSJBW mea.
A tatter from Robert J. Walker, aowkt
Bagtoad says half million «srigi»Bsa may
be it^eeed come to ibis ct
thosroottl year.
WWT iimiMii,^iiiwianii IJ. wa..-.. .. JI.Ui
.i
mm
1
I

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