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The Tomahawk. [volume] (White Earth, Becker County, Minn.) 1903-192?, July 18, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064695/1918-07-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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ITALIANS TAKE
BERAT FROM FOE
AUSTRIANS, RETIRING UNDER
PRESSURE, SURRENDER TOWN
AND ARE IN RETREAT.
TRENCH TAKE CORGY
/Bulgarian* Attempt to Draw Allied At
tention From Albania and Are Re
pulsed With Heavy Losses
North of Monastir.
London, July 12.The Austrian
(troops in Albania, under Franco-Italian
pressure, have retired beyond the
JBerat Fieri line in the direction of the
Skuhbi river and Elbasan, the nearest
natural defense northward.
The evacuation of Bera, announced
from Vienna, probably was due to the
Italian progress around Fieri and the
French advance between Lake Ochrida
and the Tormorica valley, up which
the Austrians also are retreating, pur
sued by the Allied forces.
The fighting in the Macedonian the
atre has spread eastward and the Bul
garians are making strong attacks
north of Monastir, apparently to draw
Allied attention from Albania. The
Bulgar attacks were repulsed with
heavy losses by the French. There
Js great danger that the Bulgarian line
east of Lake Ochrida will be outflank
ed should the Allied forces reach the
Skumbi at Elbasafe.
French Improve Defenses.
The French continued their jam
ming tactics on the westerly side of
the Marne salient southwest of Sois
sons, capturing the town and railway
.station of Corey and the farm and
Chateau of St. Paul, south of the city.
The gain of ground serves still fur
ther to protect the forest of Villers
Cotterets (otherwise called the Retz
forest) which forms a bulwark of the
defense of Compeigne the. important
French base and railway junction on
the east of that town.
British Push Forward.
On the British front south of the
Somme, Field Marshal Sir Douglas
Haig's infantry pushed still further
forward and won additional holding
ground east of Villers Brotonneux, on
4he ridge which stands a: an import
ant eastward defense of the Allied
ibase at Amiens.
Raiding operations comprised the
major portion of the activities on ti
remainder of the Allied front.
Drive Continues 4 Days.
The operation on the French front,
resulting in the capture of Corey,
gains in interest, in that it represents
a continuation of a series of important
local attacks on this front between the
iAisne and the Marne, begun by Gen
eral Petain four days ago. It is along
this line that the Allies apparently
count it quite probable that the Ger
mans will resume their offensive.
AIR BOMBS KILL 141 IN PARIS
Total Number Who Have Lost Lives
In Enemy^Ralds.
Paris, July 11.The Temps, in a
summary of the aerial and long range
bombardments carried out by the Ger
mans on Paris suburbs, says the first
successful raid of Importance this
year took place on the night of Jan.
30-31 last, when 55 persons were killed
and 208 were wounded. Up to June
*30, 1918, there were 20 raids by
Ctothas, and the bombardment by the
long range guns comprised 39 days.
In this period the killed numbered
141 and the wounded 432, according
to the official statements.
RUSS CROWN PRINCE SLAIN
Son of Former Czar Reported Killed
by Bolshevik Bomb.
London, July 12.Swedish newspa
pers publish a statement by a Swede
Just returned from Moscow that Alex
is Romanov, son of Nicholas Roman
ov, the former Russian emperor, had
keen killed by a bolshevik soldier by
means of a bomb, says an exchange
^Telegraph dispatch from Copenhagen.
SUBMARINES CONTROLLED
Statement of Head of British Admiral
ty In Speech.
London, July 12."The submarine*
are now controlled," Sir Eric Ueddes,
Brst lord of the admiralty, declared
In opening the official exhibition of
naval photographs. "Fewer *re oper
ating now than for some lime past.
The depth charge has changed the
Jiunters into the hunted."
Hanged for Attacking Girl.
Waco. Tex., July 12.Nat Hoffman,
white soldier, was hinged at Camp
MacArthur. He was convicted of at
tacking a school girl last April.
Convoy System Reduces Lots.
London, July 12.Speaking in the
fcouse of commons, Sir I*eo Money,
parliamentary secretary to the indus
{try of shipping, said the percentage
of ships lost while homeward bound
srince Jan. 1, 1918, was more than one
tper cent. The losses of food ship*
for the same period was less than ^4
.per cent. The result of the convoy
aystem, Sir Leo said, continued to im
prove. Since January, 1917. 42,000.000
igross tons had been convoyed to Brit
jfjk and French ports with a loss up
|to Jane 29 of 1.29 per cent.
UKRAINIANS IN REVOLT
TEUTONS RUSH TROOPS TO SUB
DUE PEASANTS.
New Siberian Government Would Re
pudiate Brest-Litovsk Treaty
and Acknowledge Debt.
Stockholm, July 12.According to
dlpatches received here, Ukrania is
in a state of countrywide revolution.
The Germans are pouring in rein
forcements, which now have reached
a total of 420,000 men.
The peasants have several small
armies of 15,000 to 20,000 each, all
well armed with artillery and machine
guns. These are defending the vil
lages and whole sections of trenches.
The fight is not of a political char
acter, but is due chiefly to the sur
render of land by the Germans back
to the landlords. Homestead sections
33 miles square have been-wiped out.
This revolution, together with the
increasing power of the Czecho-Slo
vaks in the east, necessitating diver
sion of considerable German forces,
may account in some measure for de
lay in resumption of the west front
offensive.
Repudiate Peace Pact.
London, Julyi2.The objects of the
new Siberian government include re
pudiation of the BreBLLitovsk treaty
and the establishment of a Russian re
public with an autonomous Siberia, ac
cording to a declaration made by a
member of the new government to the
Vladivostok correspondent of the
Nlchi Nichi Shimbun. says a Tokio
dispatch. It is also proposed to re
hablliatte the army and send troops
against Germany. Russia's national
debt would be acknowledged, Siberia
assuming responsibility for her share.
18 AMERICANS DIE IN ACTION
Casualty List Also Gives Names of 45
Wounded*
Washington, July 12.The last
marine corps casualty list contained
35 names, divided as follows: Killed
in action, 13 died of wounds, 4
wounded severely, 18.
The army casualty list contained 68
names, divided as follows: Killed in
action, 5 died of wounds, 10 died of
disease, 2 died of accident and other
causes, 1 wounded severely, 26
wounded slightly, 1 missing in action
23.
No Minnesota, North Dakota or
South Dakota names appear on the
list
MAIL SERVICE IS IMPROVING
Secretary Baker 8ays Many Dlffloul
ties Have Been Overcome.
Washington, July 12.Replying to
a Senate resolution Secretary Baker
advised the Senate that every 'effort
is being made to give better mail ser
vice between this country and Amer
ican troops in France and already an
improvement had been shown. Be
cause, of the large number of men sent
across and the movement of units
from one point to another, he said
almost insurmountable difficulties had
been encountered in prompt handling
of the mail.
CHEWING GUM FOR TOMMIES
British Government Buys $350,000
Worth In This Country.
New York, July 12.J. F. Brcsnahan
vice president of the American Chicle
company, said an order had been re
ceived from the British government
for $350,000 worth of chewing gum.
The gum, amounting to "7.000,000
plecas, is for the use of the British
army In France.
K. of C. to Raise 350,000^)00.
Now York, July 12.The Knights
of Columbus will raise 350,000,000 in
the development of war work in the
next 12 months, has been announced
here by the committee on war work
activities. One hundred and fifty
buildings are now in operation in
American camps and 320 secretaries
and 100 chaplains are stationed in
these buildings. One hundred addi
tional buildings are being planned, the
construction of which will entail the
appointment of a large number of ad
ditional secretaries.
A camel transport attached to the British army crossing a pontoon bridge, built by British engineers across
the Itlver Jordan. The transport is in the rear of the British army which has routed the Turks out of Palestine.
GERMAN PATROL
BADLY DEFEATED
AMERICANS ROUT LARGE ENEMY
ATTACKING FORCE IN THE
MARNE SECTOR.
IN HONOR OF MARINES
French Renamee Beileau Woodj on
Account of Valiant Services of
AmericansYankee Flyer Downs
Foee Observation Planes.
With the American Forces on the
Marne, July 12.A large German pa
trol which attempted to raid the Amer
ican trenches on the Marne. front was
broken up and routed in' confusion.
The Germans left several dead, which,
aided the Americans in establishing
the identification of new German unite.
The weather was cloudy, showery
and windy and did not permit much
airplane observation. The artillery
action continues normal.
Beileau Wood Named for Marines.
In recognition of the vaiant services
of the American troops when they
stopped the German rush on Paris in
the second battle of the Marne, cap
turing Bois de Beileau, routing the.
German machine gun nests and estab
lishing themselves in commanding po
sitions on the Marne sector, the
French authorities have officially
changed the name Bois de Beileau to
Bois de La Brigade de Marne, and
have ordered all maps changed accord
ssgy.
American Fiers Down Foe Panes
With the American Army in France,
July 12.American pursuit planes in
terrupted German observation and
photograph work behind the. American
lines.
Lieutenants Edgar Tobin of San An
tonio, Texas, and Edgar Jones of Chi
cago, atacked a biplane over Fliery, at
an autitude of 3,000 yards. They dove
after him four times down to a thou
sand yards when he fell over Thiau
court.
Lieu. Charles T. Merrick of Eldora,
Iowa, attacked another biplane north
of Fiery. The German went sliding
down on his wing and was reported
later by another American flier as
having fallen in flames.
Pursuit planes SBO attacked the en
emy's observation baloons which were
hastily pulled down.
FLOODS DESTROYING CROPS
Rain Causes Serious Damage in Aus
tria and Germany.
Zurich, Switzerland, July 12.The
Vienna newspapers report' a heavy
and continuous rainfall as having
caused floods in many parts of Aus
tria and Southern Germany, resulting
in imemnse damage to the crops. The
rain zone extends from Vorarlberg.
Northern Tyrol, across the Salzkam
mergut, upper Austria, and through
Bavaria to Saxony.
The floods were specially heavy in
the Salzkammergut, where houses and
bridges were swept away.
TAKES SHIP FROM U-BOAT
Norwegian Destroyer Recaptures Ves
sel From Submsrine.
Copenhagen, July l2rA Norwegian
destroyer recaptured a Norwegian
steamer which was being taken into
port by a prize crew from a German
submarine, according to dispatches re
ceived here. The submarine held up
the small steamer Hanka off Riser. 100
miles southwest of Chrtstiania. As the
Hanka was being taken toward the
German coast the Norwegian destroyer
appeared and started in pursuit. She)
overtook the Hanka and brought her
hack into port.
German Emblem Unpopular.
Buenos Aires, July- 12.The fea
ture of the Argentinian Independence
Day celebration here was the absence
of German flags which had been nu
merous on other national holidays.
Even important German business
houses and the recognized German
newspapers flew only Argentine flags
over their buildings. In the first year
of the war German flags were num
erous on Argentine feast days. In the
scond year there were fewer flags of
that country-
1
THE TOMAHAWK, WHITE EARTH, MINN
BRITISH CAMEL TRANSPORT IN PALESTINE VON HINTZEGETS PLAGE
Succeeds Von Kuehlmann as
German Foreign Secretary.
Considered Most Notorious Master of
Intrigue in German Diplomatic
Service.
London, July 12.A pan-German vie
tory is interpreted in the resignation
of Foreign Secretary Von Kuehlmann,
finally confirmed.
This view is strengthened by the
report that Admiral von Hlntze will
succeed Mr. Kuehlmann as he not
only is close to the kaiser, but is a
friend and supporter of Admiral von
Tirpitz and Admiral Schroeder, lead
ers of the Belgian annexationists.
However, it is considered here, that
a pan-German foreign minister is not
so dangerous to the Allies as one of
the Kuehlmann type, who masked Ger
many's plan of conquest under con
tinual tricky peace offensives, giving
Allied pacifists debating material.
London newspapers devote consider
able space to discussion of Von
Hintze's history. He is generally char
acterized as the most notorious master
of intrigue in the German diplomatic
service.
HONOR GEN. LEE'S.GRANDSON
French Award War Cross to American
Lieutenant.
Chicago, July 11.Lieut. Robert E.
Lee, grandson of the famous onfed
erate general, has been cited for the
Croix de Guerre, according to a letter
just received from him by his wife.
It is assumed the citation was for
an exploit several weeks ago in which
the lieutenant and his company cap
tured a machine gun, the lieutenant
being wounded.
Lieutenant Lee is a lawyer. He
earned his commission at the first
officer's training school at Fort Sheri
dan.
ROYALTY FLIES TO ENGLAND
Belgian King and Queen Cross Chan
nel in Airplane.
London, July 12.King Albert and
Queen Elizabeth of Belgium reached
England in an airplane when they
came last Saturday to attend the sil
ver anniversary of King George and
Queen Mary, it was learned.
Earl Curzon, member of the war
cabinet, said in his reference to the
royal couple:
"On Saturday morning they flew
over here. They were the first king
and queen to descend upon our coast
from the sky."
54 GIRLS SLAIN IN FOE RAID
Air Attack Is Mads on Belgian Ambu
lance Station.
The Hague, Juy 11.Fifty-four gir
workers were killed when German air
men made an afternoon raid on an
ambulance station at La Panne, Bel
gium, according to a dispatch from
Flushing. More than 50 bombs were
dropped. Ca Panne Is on the north
seacoast, about seven miles back of
the Allied lines.
DESIRE HOME NEWSPAPERS
Red Cross Reports Needs of American
Soldiers.
London, July 12."More home
newspapers is the constant appeal of
the American soldiers In the camps
and hospitals in Great Britain," says
an American Red Cross report.
The Amercan Red Cross Horary com
mittee in London is now furnishing
reading matter for 25,000 men week
ly, the report states, but the supply
consists largely of books.
Dutch Steamship Safe.
Amsterdam, July 12. The Dutch
steamship Hollandia passed the Haaks
lightship and is in port. A London
dispatch of June 6 reported the Am
sterdam correspondent of the Times
as saying that the steamship Hollan
dia, which was then In New York,
would sail shortly for Holland, and
that another steamer would leave Hol
land for.the United States in exchange
for the Hollandia. Germany was said
to have guaranteed the safety of both
vessels.
Veal Loaf
with such flavor!
TLibby'seexpertflavoredVealn
HIS delicately Loaf
is mad with such perfectio by
chefs in the immac
ulate Libby kitchensthat you will
always want these chefs to make it for
you. You- find it so appetizing, so
nutritious a meat at such little cost
and trouble.
Order Libby's Veal Loaf for lunch
eon today. Serve either hot of cold,
your family will delight in it.
libby, McNeill 4k Libby, Chicago
Brazil in the War.
Because not much has been heard
about Brazil's share in the war. it
must not be presumed that she is do
ing little or nothing. As a matter of
fact conscription is in force and every
possible preparation is being made to
strike a heavy blow in Europe. Bra
zil's ships are patrolling the coast, of
South America and other ships have
gone to European waters, where they
are operating with the allied navies.
The Brazilian navy includes several
dreadnoughts of good speed and"heavy
offensive power.Scientific American.
Suitable.
Bix"I want to sweep the cobwebs
from my brain." Dlx"I would sug
gest a vacuum cleaner."
fced
ame
.rge
rl la
ly aid
ar da-
ta, to
of the
tpjek-
tade,
the
wl ale-
ackers
or xol
at on*
IB the
ia- 70
I 017.
bb- of
ban
t. the
du
Mget
Slice Libby's Veal Loaf and
garnishwithcucumbers,water-
cress and# salad dressing
very tempting!
Those Girls.
'Thai nappy hat is becoming, to
you.
"But it hides most of my face."
"I said it was becoming."
Soothe Itching Scalps.
On retiring gently rub spots of dan
draft and Itching with Cutlcura Oint
ment Next morning shampoo with
Cutlcura Soap and hot water. For free
samples address, "Cutlcura, Dept.
Boston." At druggists and by mail,
Soap 25, Ointment 25 and 50.Adv.
Convincing.
Lilly"How do you know that you
are the first girl he ever kissed?" Tll
ly_Because he didn't say so."Kec-
ord.
One Carload
Every Two Minutes
IS,000 POUNDS
MEAT A MINUTE
GOING TO ALLIES
One Hog Out of Every
Four Being Sent
Abroad.
Shipments of meat have been going
to the allies for some time at the rate
of 11,000 pounds a minute. As the
shipments are kept up during a ten
hour day they amount to 9,000,00%
pounds dally. The meat goes to sol
diers of ths United States and the al
lies and to ths civilian population of
all the countries at war with Oer
many.
No industry in the
country has played a
more important part in
helping to win the war
than the American live
stock and meat-packing
industry.
Swift & Company
alone has been forward
ing over 500 car loads of
meat and meat products
per week for overseas
shipment Swift & Company, U.S. A.
.T
nlf in
mo) hoi
of m tv te an
m la a mi
ntltu on' R.
1
all
Wi cie
wl
$2i
the
!clai
-ChUmf Triton*. A 6. S$U
These statements
were made by a prom
inent representative of
tjie United States Food
Administration.

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