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The Tomahawk. [volume] (White Earth, Becker County, Minn.) 1903-192?, October 10, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064695/1918-10-10/ed-1/seq-6/

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WILSON SAYS FOE
MUST PAY PRICE
NO COMPROMISE
Tells Aims of U. S. in Liberty
Loan Address at
New York.
HUNS WITHOUT HONOR,"
"DO NOT INTEND JUSTICE"
executive Declares League of Nations
Must Be Formed at Peace Table
Which Will Make Certain That
Agreements 'of Peace Will Be Ful-
filledAsserts We Cannot Come to
Terms for the Enemy Has Made It
Impossible.
New York, Sept 30.The price of
peace will be impartial justice to all
nations, the instrumentality indis
pensable to secure It is a league of
nations formed, not before or after,
but at the peace conference, and Ger
many, as a member, "will have to re
deem her character not by what hap
pens at the peace table but by what
follows."
This was President Wilson's answer,
given Friday night before an audience
of fourth Liberty loan workers here,
to the recent peace talk from the cen
tral powers.
The President's Address.
The president spoke In part as fol
lows:
"My Fellow Citizens: I am not
here to promote the loan. That will
he doneably and enthusiastically
doneby the hundreds of thousands
of loyal and tireless men and women
who have undertaken to present It to
you and to our fellow citizens through
out the country, and I have not the
least doubt of their complete success,
for I know their spirit and the spirit
of the country.
"No man or woman who has really
taken In what this war means can hes
itate to give to the very limit of what
they have.
"And It is my mission here to try
o make clear once more what the
war really means. You will need no
other stimulation.
"We accepted the Issues of the war
as facts, not as any group of men
either here or elsewhere had defined
them, and we can accept no outcome
which does not squarely meet and set
tle them.
The War's Issues.
"Those Issues are these:
"Shall the military power of any na
tion or group of nations be suffered
to determine the fortunes of peoples
over whom they have no right to
rule except the right of force?
"Shall strong nations be free to
wrong weak nations and make them
subject to their purpose and interest?
"Shall people be ruled and dominat
ed, even In their own Internal af
fairs, by arbitrary and. irresponsible
force, or by their own will and choice?
"Shall there be a common stand
ard of right and privilege for all peo
ples and nations or shall the strong
do ss they will and the weak suffer
without redress?
"Shall the assertion of right be hap
hazard and by casual alliance or shall
There be a common concert to oblige
the observance of common rights?
"No man, no group of men, chose
these to be the Issues of the strug
gle. They are the Issues of It, and
they must be settled by no arrange*
men or compromise or adjustment of
Interests, but definitely and once for
,all and with a full and unequivocal
acceptance of the principle that the
Interest of the weakest is as sacred
as the Interest of the strongest
"This is what we mean when we
apeak of a permanent peace, If we
speak sincerely, Intelligently, and
with a real knowledge and comprehen
sion of the matter we deal with.
"We are all agreed that there can be
BO peace obtained by any kind of bar
gain or compromise with the govern
ments of the central empires, because
we have dealt with them already and
have seen them deal with other govern
ments that were party to this struggle,
at Brest-Lltovsk and Bucharest.
"They have convinced us that they
are without honor and do not Intend
Justice. They observe no covenants,
accept no principle but force and their
own interests.
"We cannot 'come to terms' with
them. They have made It Impossible.
"The German people must by this
time be fully aware that we cannot ac
cept the word of those who forced this
war upon us. We do not think the
name thoughts or speak the same lan
guage of agreement.
"It Is of capital Importance that we
should be explicitly agreed that no
peace shall be obtained by any kind of
compromise or abatement of the prin
ciples wo have avowed as the princi
ples for which we are fighting. There
should exist no doubt about that I
am, therefore, going to take the liber-
.1
1H-
Few Street Organs in London.
It Is quite seldom that a street or
gan Is seen or heard in London nowa
days, and the very few about are not
ground and trundled by an Italian or
Bis wife. The Italians have left their
organs and gone to fight their coun
try's battles their women folk trun
dled and ground the family organ In
London streets until air raids decided
to start oa country roads. In
the provinces have had,
are likely this summer again to
than they ever bar-
'lUEsV-aUmirVf MM.
ty of speaking with the utmost frank
ness about the practical implications
that are involved in it.
Foe Must Pay Price.
"If it be in deed and in truth the
common object of the governments as
sociated against Germany and of the
nations whom they govern, as I believe
it to be, to achieve by the coming set
tlements a secure and lasting peace it
will be necessary that all who sit down
at the peace table shall come ready
and willing to pay the price, the only
price that will procure it and ready
and willing also to create in some"
virile fashion the only instrumentality
by which it can be made certain that
the agreements of the peace will be
honored and fulfilled.
"That price is impartial justice in
every item of settlement, no matter
whose interest is crossed not only im
partial justice, but also the satisfac
tion of the several peoples whose for
tunes are dealt with. That indispen
sable instrumentality is a league of
nations formed under covenants that
will be efficacious.
"Without such instrumentality, by
which the peace of the world can be
guaranteed, peace will rest in part
upon the word of outlaws and only
upon that word. For Germany will
have to redeem her character, not only
by what happens at the peace table
but what follows.
"And, as I see it, the constitution of
that league of nations and the clear
definition of its objects must be a part,
is in a sense the most essential part,
of the peace settlement itself. It can
not be formed now. If formed, now, It
would be merely "a new alliance con
fined to the nations associated against
a common enemy. It is not likely that
it could be formed after that settle
jnent.
"It is necessary to guarantee the
peace, and the peace cannot be guar
anteed as an afterthought. The rea
son, to speak in plain terms again,
why it must be guaranteed, is that
there will be parties to the peace
whose promises have proved untrust
worthy, and means must be found in
connection with the peace settlement
itself to remove that source of Inse
curity.
"It would be folly to leave the guar
antee to the subsequent voluntary ac
tion of the government we have seen
destroy Russia and deceive Rqumanla.
Particulars of Terms.
"These, then, are some of the par
ticulars, and I state them with the
greater confidence because I can state
them authoritatively as representing
this government's interpretation of it*
own duty with regard to peace:
"FIRSTThe Impartial justice
meted out must Involve no discrimina
tion between those to whom we wish to
be just and those to whom we do not
wish to be Just. It must be a Justice
that plays no favorites and knows no
standard but the equal rights of the
several peoples.
"SECONDNo special or separate
Interest of any single nation or any
group of nations can be made the
basis of any part of the settlement
which is not consistent with the com
mon Interest of all.
"THIRDThere can be no leagues
or alliances or special covenants and
understandings within the* general and
common family of the league of na
tions.
"FOURTHAnd more specifically,
there can be no special, selfish, econo
mic combinations within the league
.and no employment of any force of
economic boycott for exclusion except
as the power of economic penalty By
exclusion from the markets of the
world may be vested In the league of
nations Itself as a means of discipline
and control.
"FIFTHAll international agree
ments and treaties of every kind must
be made known In their entirety to
the rest of the world.
"Special alliances and economic
rivalries and hostilities have been
the prolific sources in the modern
world of the plans and passions that
produce war. It would be an Insin
cere as well as Insecure peace that
did not exclude them in definite and
binding terms,
"Plain workaday people have demand
ed almost every time they came to
gether, and are still demanding, that
the leaders of their governments de
clare to them plainly what It Isex
actly what it Isthat they were seek
ing In this war and what they think
the Items of the final settlement
should be.
"They are not yet satisfied with
what they have been told. They still
seem to fear that they are getting what
they ask for only in statesmen's terms
only In the terms of territorial ar
rangements and the divisions of pow
er and not in terms of broad vision,
justice andx
satisfaction of those deep-seated long
ings of oppressed and distracted men
and women and enslaved peoples that
seem to them the only things worth
fighting a war for that engulfs the
world.
Believes Allies* Aims Same.
"Germany is constantly intimating
the /terms* she will accept and al
ways finds that the world does not
want terms. It wishes the final tri
umph of justice and fair dealing."
ONLY FIRST 100 NUMBERS
MADE PUBLIC BY WIRS
Practically Impossible to Forward the
Full Result of the DrawingAr
rangements Made for District Boards
Announce This Later.
The president In person opened the
ceremony, of drawing numbers for the
13,000,000 men registered in the new
draft. The capsule he drew'contained
the number 322.
Amid ceremonies profoundly im
pressive and of transcendent historical
significance. Gen. Peyton C. March,
chief of staff of the army, received la
person this vast force of as yet ununl
formed reserves, on behalf of the mil
itary branch of the government
4,000,000 In Arms by July.
And from this reservoir of man pow
erthe largest body of citizen soldiers
ever offered by the people of any na
tion to their governmentGeneral
March is to recruit the army of 4,001V
000 men which he has promised to
have overseas by July 1 next to back
up General Pershing on the battlefields
of Europe.
Every man In the registration la af
fected, as from those who are not
called for active military duty the
country's war managers propose to
mobilize a great Industrial army of
war workers to make certain of a con
stantly flowing stream of men and mu
nitions to the field of battle.
The roll call, which Is to assign to
each of the 13,000,000 men a military
number determining the order In
which he is to be called, was begun by
President Wilson himself, and not fin
ished until late In the afternoon next
day.
As the tally sheets were filled they
were rushed over to the government
printing office for the official master
list, which, when completed, were sent
by General Crowder to all district
boards throughout the country, which,
in turn' were to make them public
through the newspapers. In that way
the country at large was Informed of
the order of all the numbers within a
few days.
Wilson Is Applauded.
There was a hearty round of ap
plause as the president, blindfolded
with a piece of cloth taken from the
covering of one of the chairs used
at the signing of the Declaration of
Independence, approached the table
on which rested the famous glass
bowl used upon the first drawing.
Provost Marshal Gen. Crowder guid
ed his hand as he reached down Into
the bowl to pick one of the 17,000 blue
capsules containing the numbers.
There was increased handclapplng
when It was announced that the first
number of the drawing was 322, for
the number which the president drew
has a registrant representing it In
every one of the 4,557 local boards in
the country. Every man whose serial
number corresponds to It may there
fore consider that the command to
"march" or "work" comes from the
commander in chief himself.
Vice President Marshall, similarly
blindfolded, picked put the second
number. It proved to be a high num-
ber7,277which will be order No. 2
for all boards having registrants bear
ing that number. The average number
of registrants to a board ranges only
from 2,800 to 3,000.
The" number which President Wll
for* drew has a registrant represent
ing it in practically every district In
th* United States. Other numbers fol
low:
4,287
12.8S9
625
72
11,338
No.
No. No. No. No.
No.
No. No. No.
No. No. Vo.
No. No.
\'o.
No.
Vo.
Vo.
No. No.
322
ro
mercy and peace and the
_| .y _) |_ -l
SJM
l-(odftrU-I
gained for. It's an ill wind that blow-sjTjvv'More
nobody any good at any rate, the
children will be of that opinion, but
it is to be hoped that the little girls
of Soho will not forget how to dance.
Christian Science Monitor.
Popular Sengs Greet Yanks in France.
American troops now arriving In
France are being greeted with "Hall!
HaU! the Gang's All Here!" from
French children who have been taught
this song by some of the Irst Assort
cans to arrive
i
THE TOMAHAWK. WHITE EARTH. MINN
WILSON OPENS DRAFT
President Draws Number 322 in
Registration Lottery at
Washington.
51
62 51
54
55
56 832
67 10,491
58 14.023
59 14.043
60.. r. 964
61 8,637
62 2,897
63 7.834
64. 4,723
65 10.656
66 4,327
67 3.505
68 348
69 7.284
70 4
71 12.842
72 4.482
78 4 9.022
7.277 No, No. No.
1.... 2.... 3 6,708
4 1.027 No.
5 16.169
6 8,36fi
7....
8.... 9....
10.... 11.... 12....
13 10.09S
14 43S
15 904
16 12.36S
No. No.
5 366 No.
1.697
7.123 2.781
9,783 6,147
No.
No. No.
&: No.
No. No.
No.
No. No. No.
No.
17 1.623
18 7.6U
19 6.360
20.. 3.74S
21
6.5401No..
3,808
No
Vo. No. Vo.
Vo.
No. No.
No.
n* 1.24 0
No.
No. No.
No. No. No. No
\'o.
\'o.
No.
24 16.S46
25 1.907
26 12,521
27 6.593
28 5.941
29 3.073
3
30 13.72S:/
31
32 kS^No
33 1.2551 No
34 !4.122lC-0
Si 11.101
3* 2.132K-0
37 10.7S
38 3,235!
39 "*!No.
40..*. 16.B57iNo
41 MWjfo.
42 4.94S]No'
43 8.772 No.
44 7.03-4 No.
45 535jNo.
46 S.CTl'No.
47 11.060'No
48 8.858! No!
4* 219No.
60. M,518!Nb.
Vn. No. No.
No.
*o.
Vo,
*o.
So. No.
No. No. No.
^o. Vo.
No.
*9vBF
76 160
77 12.980
78 134
79 14.319
80 12.210
.81.. 8.317
82 3!
83 5.240
84 12.28*
85 11.25.1
86...., 657
N
2, 'NO'
...12.61 8
8.58 1
..14.361
...14.361 ...13.754 ...11.464 ...13 481
8.055
6.777 7.952
87..
88....
89..".". 90..
91.. 92..
93.. 94. 95.
96...... 11.191
97 15.-60
98.
99 100 11.232
S3*
Army of Students In Line. _.
than 150.000 men were added
to America's fighting strength when
members of the students* array train*
Ing corps were formally mustered in,
at the colleges throughout the country.
The impressive ceremony arranged for
the occasion was set for eleven o'clock
October 1. A message from President*
Wilson was read on every campus.
Collegians In the training corns draw
the pay of army privates, and are
housed, clothed, and fed by the gov
ernment. There is no tuition fee. Each
student is showed only three subjects.
a
Bract Copy of vvrapncf-
fl
Not a Customer.
3 was visiting in the city and went
with an older relative to the city
library. The relative, who wished to
consult some books In the reference
room, decided to leave him to be en
tertained in the children's room'menn
whlle. When she returned she asked
the attendant inechnrge how. he had
got along and was told, "He's all right
now,* but at first I couldn't get him to
look at a thing." Bather surprised,
because he Is generally fond of books,
she turned to the youngster. "Why,
James, iidn't you want to look at the
pretty books?"
"Aw," he said gruffly, "I didn't know
she jus" wanted me to look at them
I thought she wanted to sell me one,
and I wasn't going to buy any. I'm
saving my money for a soldier's belt!"
Live 200 Years!
For more than 200 years, Haarlem Oil,
the famous national remedy of Holland,
has been recognized as an infallible relief
from all forms of kidney and bladder dis
orders. Its very age is proof that it must
have unusual merit.
If you are troubled with pains or aches
in the back, feel tired in the morning,
headaches, indigestion, insomnia, painful
or too frequent passage of urine, nutation
or stone in the bladder, you will almost
certainly find relief in GOLD MEDAL
Haarlem Oil Capsules. This is the good
old remedy that has stood the test for
hundreds of years, prepared in the proper
Jt
uantity and convenient form to take,
is imported direct from Holland lab
Sralonel, and you can get it at any
drug store. It Is a .standard, old-tune
home remedy and needs no introduction.
Each capsule contains one dose of five
drops and is pleasant and easy to take.
They will quickly relieve those stiffened
joints, that backache, rheumatism, lum
bago, sciatica, gall stones, gravel, "brick
dust." etc. Your money promptly refund
ed if they do not relieve yon. But be sure
to get the genuine GOLD MEDAL brand.
In oozes, three sizes.Adv.
Next Day.
It chanced, In the days before the
ivar, that an Englishman In Berlin be
came acquainted with a young German
officer. One day they were lingering
over a tete-a-tete luncheon.
The officer got up and said, "I will
give you a toast." Balslng his well
filled glass, he added: "I drink to The
Day!"' and there was a smile on his
lips which hinted at some hidden Jest
In the words.
His companion, the Englishman,
looked at him quietly.
"Indeed. Herr Lieutenant!" he said:
"let me follow your toast with one of
my, own: 'Here's to "The Day
After I"'"
Stop tfe Fata.
The hurt of a burn or a cut stops when
Cole's Carbolisalve is applied. It heals
quickly without scars. 26c and GO by
all druggists. For free sample write The
J. W. Cole Co.. Rockford, 111.Adv.
Electric Pencil.
A new electric pencil for marking or
anting on any polished steel or Iron
surface Is operated as readily as an
ordinary pencil. A stepdown trans
former connects it to a lighting socket,
and as the point of the pencil is drawn
over the steel, the resistance to the
passage of the current develops great
hsat, etching the surface at the point
of contact. A rheostat gives control
of the depth of etching.
A Very Woman.
He (rapturously)"You accept mel
Then It's a bargain?" She (calmly)
"eratinly! I shouldn't consider it if
ft) wasn't."
There are' many tinkling cymbals In
the land who seem to think that they
are thinking symbols.
A prudent man never butts Into
danger for the purpose of advertising
bis bravery.
station is a bubble that
low nnd fteu punctures. 'Wow
Children Cry For
CASTORIA
What is*CASTORIA
Castoria is a harmless substitute for Castor Oil, Paregoric, Drops
and Soothing Syrups. It is pleasant. It contains neither Opium,
Morphine nor other narcotic substance. Its age is its guarantee.
Fox more than thirty years it has been in constant use for the
relief of Constipation, Flatulency, Wind Colic and Diarrhoea
allaying Feverishness arising therefrom, and by regulating the
Stomach and Bowels, aids the assimilation of Food giving
healthy and natural sleep. The Children's Panacesr-Tho
Mother's Friend.
GENUIN E CASTORIA ALWAYS
Bears the Signature of
In Use For Over 30 Years
The Kind You Have Always Bought
HIS MEMORY SOMEWHAT HAZY
Seattle Man Not Quito Certain Wheth
er Ho Had Enlisted, but He
Was No-Quitter.
Last summer, when every young
man's thoughts were on the war, a
wealthy lumberman from Seattle ar
rived In New York on a business trip.
His business having been attended to
he. was a guest at a dinner given One
evening by an officer In the United
States marine corps. As the hours
and the flowing bowl passed, speeches
became more and more frequent, ev
erybody was wrought up, and there
was no man so base as to say that he
would not go to the front for his coun
try,
Early the neat morning the Seattle
man started back home.
A few days later the officer of ma
rines received this telegram from him:
"Did I enlist that night? If so, In
struct me when and where to report"
Popular Magazine.
The Individual and the State.
"Do you think satisfactory arrange
ments can eventually be made with
Germany concerning armament and
trade?"
"Well," answered Broncho Bob, "I
don't pretend to be any International
statesman. But I don't see why Ger
many couldn't be regulated the same
as Cactus Joe. Cactus Joe was an aw
ful worrisome man till we passed an
ordinance lnstructln' the sheriff to
shoot on sight If he was caught car
ryin' a weapon and Jallln' any deal
er who sold him a stack of poker
chips.*
Leave to Print.
"What's* the objection to my print
ing what I like In the Congressional
Record?" asked the new member of
congress.
"You've got to suffer for the gen
eral good, son," replied Senator Sor
ghum, soothingly. "You're liable to
slap something In that Is so interest
ing there won't be white paper enough
in the country to meet demands for
that particular issue."
Never judge a maxim by a man who
repeats it.
A horse Isn't any heavier when he is
led.
life to darkMS wort* emek to the
a or woman with aa acM-abumsea.
ArM stomach kills Hope. Ambition,
Energy. Courage. It saps the strength
f the strongest bodyhnpoiarlahea the
bloodceases natoM suffering makes
minions weak. unSt sad brings OH pre
mature old age.
Millions of people are week .and unlit,
suffering an the time. Is one way or an
other, from superacldity or aeM-stomach.
They don't seem dangerously sick.
Just aUing. Going through life weak,
listless dragging one root after another.
They're nervous and IrRtable lack pow
er and punch, frequently hare severe
attacks of blinding, splitting headaches
object to fits of melancholia and men
tal depression. And nearly always their
stomachs are oat of order, eren though
many experience no actual stomach
painsdigestion poornever getting
anywhere near the foil strength from
their food.
So. yen see. It's Jnst thisacid-stom
achthat Is holding so many people
back sapping up the strength tbey
ahonld get from their foodtaking away
their vigor awl Titatttyleaving tnem
weak and inefficient.
G*t rlS of taw nsceias new. That's
the secret of good heal snd is the only
way to obtain goad digestion and assias-
OITV.
WWO I Women as well as men
Vilv/ 1 9 are made miserable by
TY\ kidney and bladder trou
x\J hie.
Thousandsl recom-'re
AMI? e
Dr. Kims
Olv/hBrltV swamp-Root, the great
kidney medicine. At druggists in large
and medium slse bottles, xdu
enclose ten cents, also mention this paper.
National Hotel
Opposite New Post Office
WaaUagtss sad Senas Ave. S., MINNEAPOLIS
Steam heat hot and cold running water and tele
phone ta erery room. Special rates to.Stoctantn,
Country Merchants and Farmers. IPs spj aa
WHITE SCOURS
BLACKLEG
Your Veterinarian can stamp
them out with Cutter's Anti-Call
Scour Serum sad Cutter's Germ
Fre^BlacklegFUtrate and Aggressia,
or Cuttor'a Blackleg Fills.
Ask him about thorn. If no
hasn't our literature, write to usfof
information on these products.
The Cutter Laboratory
Berkeley, Cal., or Chicago, ILJU
W. fl. U., Minneapolis, No. 40-1918.
Just for Two Minutes!
A burly black scrapper saw his first
German In a camp of prisoners. Ha
looked them over Incredulously, with
a look of great amazement on his
face,
"You mean to tell me them measly
boneheads is Germans?* Be demanded.
"Hand me a shovel, man, and let mo
In theah for two minutes."
Beyond Self-Control.
"Does Bligglns ever speak
truth?"
"There's a chance that he does,
am told he talks In his sieep."
It's Acid-Stomach
That Makes Millions
Sick and Suffer
tho
nation. It Is the right way to be wen
and keep strong. Ordinary medicine
won't do any lasting good. The best
they can do is to spur op your appetite
for awhile.
A sMdern remedy makes It
to remove excess acli without the slight
est discomfort. It to called BATONIO,
In the form of pleasant tasting tablets.
Their action la the stomach to a good
deal like a piece of blotting paper taking
op a drop of Inkthey literally nbearts
the mfsages excess add and cany tt
away through the Intestines.
Begin nslag KATONIC right new
todayand get en the road to bounding.
vlgarons, vibrant health. Thuosande
upon thooaands of people who have
used KATONIO are enthusiastic In Its
praise. They say Jbey never dreamed
that anything ceeH brine them seen
quick reUef.
KATONIC to folly gsntsnteed. Tern?
diimgtot will give yon a big box for only
centn with the distinct understanding
that if you are not pleased In every way.
you get your SO cents back, if you can't
get KATONIC where you live send US
your name and address: we will send
you a Sfty cent box aad you eaa send
us the 50c when yon get it. Address
Satanic Remedy Oo.. Cumber stag.. Chi
lli.

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