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New Ulm weekly review. [volume] (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, October 02, 1878, Image 1

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VOLUME I.
fFEFyERLB,
Dealer is
GROCERIES and PROVISIONS.
Canned, Dried and Green Fruit,
LOUB AND FEED,
Sroxa, Woounr AJTD wumer Wis*,
CNN. ST., NEW ULW, If WW.
|"WAEOTA HO06B,
r r. Pom Omo-Nzw ULM,
ADOLPH SETTER, PHOT**.
Ad* bouse It the meet oeafevHy knatet
house in the city en* affords good
Sample Rooms.
WJ 7. WEBBER,
Attorney & Counselor
AT LAW.
MONEY TO LOAN.
Office over Citizen's National Bank.
JFXWULK, MINNESOTA
F*
QUINCT.
Mxmsnarxnt** ASTD DHAMK
Harness. Collars, Saddles,
Saddlery, Bltofcets, Whips,
etc.
^^vWe etc.
Upholstery end ell eessssn work pertaining
to my business preenptiy ettasstofl tow
Minn. St, opposite Union Hoaee,
WEWPLM, WIS*.
fcl
JUKXEMAMK,
TaKOTACTOK** iHD 1
Harnesses, Collars,
Saddles, Whips,
Saddlery, TiflinlMfi,
etc., etc., e*je.
Upholstery, *nd All custom work rjertsinrBfj
my business promptly aUeaHtal to.
Mtem. 8t., Next Door to Ziher'i Ratam,
NEW ULM.
i
H. CnUDBOCKW C.K. Rewa.
Cttfhier.
President.
BBOWN CO. BANK,
Oor. Minn. Oesnre Steswts.
NEW ULM, umtmoovk.
OoUeotMns end nil bttsmesB pertsnmfchg
te banking
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
INDIVIDUAL RESPONSMTW
*500,000,
olre6treet
OEU8.ROO*.
Jem* Bauc.
H. A. BCBIUA,
NewUlm City Mill,
New Ulm, Minn.
We sr ranntagday and night, and can supply
any quantity of best brands of Flour at
regularrates on short notice.
hare improred machineryfortbe grinding
of aborts and fodder, having added
a atone reserved for such
ft purpose.
Floor exchanged for wheat en very liberal
terms.
NEW ULF CITY HTLL CO.
EAT MAfcKET,
C. STUEBE, Prop'r.
A bwjpeeupply of fresh meats, seussge, hams
lard,tc, etc., constantly on band. All orders
from tbe eountry promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES. 1
MINN. 8T NEW ULM, MINN/
Crrr
Meat Market,
M. EPPLE, PKOP'K
large supply of fresh meals: sausage,
hams, lard, etc., etc., constantly on
hand. All orders from the coun- rM
try promptly attended to.
CASH PAID
INN, STREET,
I"- iifiiiiiilii M'Ht'MtSsk
FOR HIDES.
NEW ULM. MINN
am
Bepnblican Nominations.
STATE TICKET.
For Judge of tbe Supreme Court,
JOHN M. BERRY.
For State Auditor,
O. P. WHITCOMB.
For Clerk of the Supreme Court,
SAMUEL H. NICHOLS.
Congressional Ticket.
Foe Congress--Second
HORACE
District,
B. STBAIT.
Legislative Ticket.
For Representative,
& BRANDT.
County Ticket.
For Auditor,
H. B. CONSTANS.
Ror Begister of Deeds,
A.F.WALTON.
For Sheriff,
ED. PAULSON.
For Clerk of the Dist. Comrt,.
ALBEBT BLANCHARD.
For Judge of Probate,
CASPFR H. CHRISTENSEN.
For County Attorney,
B. F. WEBBER.
For.Court Commissioner,
E. G. KOOH.
For County Surveyor,
JULIUS BERNDT,
For Coroner,
JONAS LAUTENSCHLAGER.
For Commissioner 4th Dist.
L. D. RICE.
The Democrats of Massachusetts
in convention last week nominated
J. F. Abbott for Governor, and a
full Anti-Butler ticket, and adopted
a hard money platform.
The executive committee of the
Union League, at its meeting in
Pittsburgh last week, unanimously
resolved in favor of a currency con
vertible on demand into coin, and
pledged its efforts to promote the
election of those candidates only who
stand on this platform.
The 27th Republican Senatorial
committee have at last issued a call
for a convention to be held at
Sleepy Eye, Tuesday, October 15th,
at 3 o'clock p. m. Under the call
Brown county is entitled to 9 dele
gates, Lac Qui Parle 2, Lyon 2, Lin
coln 2, Redwoodtf,nd Yellow Mede
cine 4. The apportionment is based
upon the vote cast for Gov. Pillsbury
last year.
A few days ago emissaries
from Sitting Bull arrived at Fort
Keogh to ascertain on what terms
they would be permitted to surrend
er to the United States military au
thorities. General Sheridan tele
graphed them the following answer:
"We are not especially anxious
about the Indians who went north
coming back, but if they come back
at all, it must be on the terms of
unconditional surrender.''
Now that the call for the Repub
lican Senatorial convention has been
issued, the next thing in order would
be to cast about' fpr a candidate.
We understand that a candidate will
be presented from Lac Qui Parle
county, but as the Senator for thebe,
ensuing term is generally conceded
to Brown county, the question is na
turally asked, who shall we present
The REVIEW has no candidate, neith
er do we wish to urge upon the con
vention the claims of any particular
one, but would state as mere matter
of information that Hon. K. H. Hel
ling,of Linden, is a candidate for the
position. There may also be other
aspirants but we have not heard of
any. Mr. Helling is a middle aged
man,of Norwegian descent, has serv
ed one term in the House and is in
every way well qualified for the im
portant and responsible position, and
should his candidacy be favorably
considered by the convention he
will receive the hearty support of
the REVIEW. r.*
"ii.Mj.
.^l"".." "it---*X ^^WM-^'^ H5, o^S'AiWS^^g|}sa.
KEW ULM, 1VEDNESDAY, OC^T. 2nd, 1878.
Another Reason for not Supporting
Feebler for Congress,
Is, that the policy of the Democratic
party is to be shaped and controlled
by the South. It is a fact that for
twenty years previous to the war,
the Northern wing of the old party
had no voice in the councils of its
leaders. The old masters of the lash,
ruled their Northallies with the
same imperious spirit that they ruled
their slaves on the plantation, and
for the Northern Democrat who
possessed too much of the spirit of
true manhood to tamely submit to
their dictation, there was no course
left but to leave the party, which is
well known, tens of thousands did,
and it was out of this material that
the Republican party was made
men who had both minds and wills
of their own and thus these men
whose love of party was not stronger
than that love of justice laid the
foundation of the party that has
made the rights of man the cardinal
element of its political creed.
gotten
and have you forgotten how subse
quently every democrat in the
House with the exception of Alex.
Stephens and a dozen others, voted
for the Potter resolution, and there
by started the infamous "Potter
Smelling Committee" on its travels
over the country, at an expense to
the people of forty or fifty thousand
dollars! and for what? solely to make
political capital. If Mr. Pcehler were
to be consulted as to his opinion of
the Democratic idea of reducing the
army to a mere skeleton, he would
undoubtedly say "I am opposed to
it," end would speak the honest sen
timents of his heart but the South
has resolved on tearing the army,
under its present organization to
pieces, not because they are opposed
to a standing army, and a large one
too, but because they are opposed to
the army as now officered, by men like
Generals Sherman, Sheridan, Miles,
Hancock, McDowell and others who
fought against them and finally
brought them again into subjection:
to the government of the United
States. For these men, the South
ern Democracy entertain an undy
ing hatred, and have in their secret
councils resolved on driving them
from their commands, and. to ac
complish this, they will go, if neces
sary, to the extremity of wiping out
the army, then get up a war with
Mexico or some other fuss, that will
demand an army organized anew,
and officer it as before the war, with
Southern men.
This will be done as sure as night
is to follow the day,if the Democrats
sneceed in getting control of both
houses of Congress. Now we sub
mit to the candid consideration
of voters of this district
whether we as Union men, can af
ford, by voting for even so good a
man as we all know Mr. Pcehler to
to strengthen a party whose poli
cy must inevitably be unfriendly to
the interest of the country at large.
-(rlencoe Begister.
The boiler of the steamer Adelphi
exploded near Gordon's Point, Nor
walk, Conn., last Saturday, with
terrific effect, tearing away the main
deck, the boiler, hatch and a portion
of the saloon on the port side, in
stantly killing twelve and horribly
scalding and precipitating others in
to the water. At the time of the
accident about 200 passengers were
on board, and the scene of the disas
ter is described by an eve witness as
most heart rending. The boat was
14 years old,and has not been regard
ed safe for years.
jK
ges
S
i
Let it be remembered that every man
who votes for Henry Pcehler this fall
votes in favor of paying the rebel
war claims bills for which have al
ready been presented by the South
ern members to the enormous a
mount of $300,000,000. But say you,
Henry Pcehler will never vote such
a tax upon the people, but say we,
he will, or he might as well pack his
trunks and come nome, lor anything
that he will be able to do for himself
or his constituents. Have you for-
how Northern Democrats,
oth in Congress and out, scouted
the idea of again opening the ques
tion of Hayes' title to the presiden
tial office, and how unanimously a
resolution looking to that end was
at first voted down in%
the House?
*I:J"
YELLOW FEVER.
It Hakes Mourners In BlinmesoUu
Correspondence of the Pioneer Press.
BENSON, Sept. 26, 1878.Darvin
S. Hall, formerly of Beaver Falls, but
now of the Benson land office, to
day received a dispatch that his
mother had died,and that his father,
E. D. Hall, could live but a short
time. His only brothers, Ward and
Charles, remain with their father at
Ocean Springs, Mississippi, and will
no doubt be the next victims of that
terrible disease, yellow fever. An
extract from a letter recently receiv
ed by D. S. Hall from his father
shows that precaution avails little or
nothing. lie says: "We build smud
nights and mornings around the
ouse fumigate the house with cof
fee and brown sugar, burnt have
just got some tar to burn and lime
to scatter around have creosote in
vessels under and around the house
camphor and "fetta" in our pockets
and around the house take three
times a day a table spoonful of sul
phate of soda dissolved in water, and
put sulphur into the water we bathe
in. So you see we are fighting the
scourge the best we can." Poor
folks, they failed, and one of the
most pleasantly situated and happy
homes is broken up. This is butment
one instance. It comes home to us.
It is terrible!
The farmers all over the State are
making an emphatic protest against
the present grading of wheat estab
lished by the Milwaukee board of
trade and the Minneapolis Miller's
Association. They claim that it is
not a just one for thel grading of
the peculiar crop now being market
ed, and committees have oeen ap
pointed at Willmar, Owatonna and
other places with a view to bring a
bout a less arbitrary grading. The
difference in prices between No. 2
and No. 3 is fifteen cents, between:
No. 2 and rejected thirty-five cents.
This difference causes much of the
dissatisfaction, as wheat falling nalfi
or a pound below required weight
for No. 2 falls fifteen cents in price.
Burnstown Items*.
The weather still continues pleasant
but the nights are cold..
Trade in our burgh Is quite lively.
Any quantity of eggs and butter are
brougt in daily, and as the weather
grows cooler the butter improves in
quality and commands a better price..
Boys will be boys and must have
their enjoyment. To-night, the 27th
inst., they almost completely deserted
us to attend the grand social at Mr.
Mc Guires, at Willow Lake. The Burns
town string band accompanied, them..
The farmers are busy bringing their
grain to market, but are not at all sa
tisfied with the prices so liberally of
fered them by our grain merchants,
Messrs. Anderson and Arnos. The
wheat grading so low has a bad effect
on the price.
Our shoemaker Mr. August Wang
rine, isgetting up agood trade amongst
us. We are determined to have new
shoes for tbe winter. Call on August,
he's a good man and will be pleased
toseeyou.
Our Mr. Fecker has removed his
beer counter entirely out of his. house
and stopped the beer business. This is
the first stepping stone toward temper
ance, and we hope that we'll soon have
your name down, Lucas.
Caucus meeting held in this place on
the 27th inst. to elect delegates to re
present our town In the Independent
county convention to be held at New
Ulm, on October 5th, was very largely
attended, and J. J. Bay and Gust
Schwartzrock were elected as such de
legates.
3j
The colliers have suspended opera
tions until they get an engine on the
ground. Samples of coal was brought
in and tried and It made and excellent
fire. x. fe#l"
Sleepy Eye, Sept. 27, 78.
4V-
fit
ABOUT THE GREENBACKS.
Editor Review:%:K~ ---w
In thisfirst article of a series,intend
ed more especially for workingmen. 1
wish to state some facts about the
greenbacks.
1. These were issued in a time of
national calamity when war was ex
hausting the productive resources of
the land.
5 ..-x
WW*
'fMf
L,.
('"^&V$^^''hM'''',
KW F, f, 5 5
NUMBER 40.
2,, They were issued in lieuof money,
and are simply notes, or promises of
money. Greenbacksatrfctl speaking,
are not money but checks-which the
government thatissuecTthenvpromises:
to pay in money on demands
3. These notes, or promises, or'
checks though not money/ have a
value because (1} they past current
and are not circulated in amount' be-~
yond the ability of the government to
take them up when they shall be pre
sented for that purpose (2) because
the government by its pledge has cre
ated a general expectation that some
time within the life of the present
generation they shall be redeemed.
4. The greenback has no value be
cause it is issued by a great nation..
The amount of^the issue and the pros
pect of its redemption alone determines.
its value.
5. All greenback issue that is more,
in quantity than the ability of the go
vernment toredeem incoin is valueless..
If two million dollars is the limit of a,
government's ability, financial ability,"
then it can redeem but that amount of
its outstanding obligation in the shape
of notes, promises or pledges. If the
Outstanding obligation is twice that
amount then the notes will depreciate
half their value. An increase of pledges
with no corresponding increase of abil
ity to redeem depreciates the whole
volume of pledges,
6. When the greenbacks were issued
there was given along with the issue a
pledge of their redemption. It is un
patriotic and dishonest in the govern
to take any course whatever to
prevent the fulfillment of the promise.
7. The value of the greenback has
fluctuated with the credit of the nation-,
and by credit we mean, what we hope
every honest manmeans, boththe aot7
ity and obligation of the nation. Nff.
man's credit is good who does not back
Mis ability by his obligation to pay his.
debts. The same is true of nations.
Greenbacks then are not money but
pledges of money they have a value,.
but it is commensurate with the quan
tity issued and the prospect of their re
demption, or the credit of the nation.
CUAMFLIN.
SLEEPY EYE, SEPT.,
JU&x
30,1878.
IT BAS cone i
Ttmt miztnre of dimntfefled elermotoknown the*
Greenback LaborParty ba held, on short notice, a
Scultjr
acked mass convention at SleepyEy*. Some dlf
was experienced in Mcurtnc a place la
which tbe new element in polities eoeld bebrought'
Into life,lbnt through the poUtenen of Mr. FohV
who kindly offered bis saloon for the pnrpose, and
tinder the directions and with the asstetaaee of Dr.'
W. B. Wellcomewho Is supposed by some to.
understand eueh matters perfectlythe creature
was brought Into life and fight, and tt now doing
as well eould be expected considering all the
cirenmstanees attending Its birth.
All the Sleepy Eye bummers werela attendance,
doing their utmost to set the Doctor's pet on ltas
lega. After a Teat amount of eonfuston, noise, talk,
drinking of beer *c, a partial tieket was made ouC
It however became apparentthat the foundllafjwaa
growing too large and was going beyond the con
trol of the ponderous gentleman in charge. Belief,
or rather asslsstanee, arrived, when tbe youngster
was withdrawn from the bummer Influence and
transported, body and soul, to Allison's grove.
But the bummers followed! After considerable
dancing around snd much agreeing to disagree
work was again commenced. The Dr. made a few
remarks. In fact he grew soextremely temarkabto.
that he made a speech. It was a mighty and gloxj.
ous effort. His arms rose and fell majesricajp*
suggesting a possible method of constructing
double actionairlpump that would moveavast vol
ume of ga-na snort time. Like Balaam's ass his
mouth opened |but his words were not always
words of wisdom. Be pranced and roared on the
little arena. Fatherless adjectiveswereflungwild,
ly in tbe-air. Childless Nouns sorrowing, sought
widowed Pronouns. Verbs snd Adverbs were
violently apart and scattered to the winds of heav-..ctorn
en. Interjections of the wildest and most distorted
shapes, wandered disconsolate among the trees,
seeking the eavern of the winds fromwhieh they
issued. Articles and PreposiUons were shot forth,
with such lightning rapidity that conjunctions.'
stout as the hawser of a seventy-four could note
hold them in place. But winds can not blow with
hurricane force forever. The wild look departed
from his eyes the unnatural eolor from his face.,
and as he bared bis noble brow to receive the .fait'
breezes of heaven Richard was himself again. Tnea.i
voting began and wasfcarried on amid much con
fusion. As candidates werenamed new oratorsbe.
gan to develops. Exhortations of the wildest ehnr^
acterwere the order of the day. The bummers,
would be unrnly and, like Banqno's ghost, woold,
not down. It became the young men's turn. Tbey
had left their work and were determined to b.
beard. One from the Cottonwood was more ex.
cited than usual. He implored, hesignedhe ex
horted and Ike the Wizard in "Sochiel'a Warning,"-'
befortold downfall in ease bis views were not ac
cepted and his wishes canted ous. TruthIs said to,
be a jewel but being a plain working man he could
not consistently wear jewelry, perhaps he felt that*
Msassumed position as one among theleaders, re.
ouiretLhim to discard jtwelry snd discard it lie
did when his ends so xequired. Doubtless, like,
many others encaged the ditty-work, of politics,
the Cottonwooa oratorCtem thattheend jostiflW
the means.
Night, that usually brings unlet, peace aad restt
to the calm and good, came bat brought no rent
tbe disturbed winds ofthe chiefactorsinthis affair.
Speakingwas to foBew. Among the speakers
was our mead the Doctor. Strange that he had
not exhausted himself. Tet again, how could that
be. Might as well seek tbe beginning or end of a
circle aa to seek a methodofteavinrtne gentleman
with nothing more to say. As well ask were too
windscome from. However he spoke. Assuming:
that be spoke tbetruth, be is one of these bloated
bondholders. Not yet bloated to any great extent
though. ("Only ten thousand dollars, gentlemen, in
untaxed bonds, gentlemen, when hecameto, New i
Ulm." Jut think, abloated bondholder Wing the,
working men. How generooeT How disinterested! I
A friend at our elbow ask^MMnf beIshlngfotT'.
Time alonecan answer, ttf tfie'tjeket thelabels 'X^-f.,
on the foundling. Audttor,, Cewstans Clerk of
C-l
Court, 8. A. George Keg. IMmUX:-Walton Judge
flt.
tv
of Probate, Westphal Cfe.Attf]|l%hltnan Sheriff,. ,#*&
Cba*. Berg Surveyor, Q. riife Coroner, Dr r,tt^c
Manillas Representative^ Tboaus-Xeegsn.
Should Peter Cooper or Depots Kearney fail to
recognize onseeingthis ticket should they think
they saw any connected |th banks on thff ticket
theirdoubts may be dissipated and identity estnK.
lished by looking at that mole ona certain part of*
tbe body. The mole is square and at tbe corners*
respectively, may be found tbe letterstbe open*
sesame to the partyJ. W.B. W.
(Sleepy Eye-i
'BiW

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