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New Ulm weekly review. [volume] (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, November 06, 1878, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89064939/1878-11-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLISHED BVERY WEDNESDAY BY
JOS. BOBLETER.
Office over City Drug Stent
TEEMS:
OH DOLLAK PBB YZAB Dl AS^ABCE.
SAT! ADTOBTtSIMl.
Tea lanes "BBEVIXR" makes a Square.
Space 11 11 3
1 Square
ft Squares
Column
Column
1 Column
publication fees are paid.
In connection with the paper, we have a
splendid assortment of Jobbing Material, and
we are prepared to execute all kinds of print
ing in a style unsurpassed and at moderate
rates.
R. a BERRY,
PHYSICIAN A SURGEON,
Omoi AT a Crrr Drnco Bronx.
SEW ULM, MINNESOTA.
T\B, A. 1CARDEN,
RESIDENT DENTIST,
Office, comer Mian, and First N. Ste.
SEW ULM, MINNESOTA.
AEOTA HOUSE,
0PP. POST OWTCKNEW "Cue, Mrsw,
ADOLPH SETTER, PBOP*B.
Shis house is the most centrally located
house in the city and affords good
8nple Rooms.
T% F. WEBBER,
iA.ttorney &> Counselor
AT LAW.
MONEY TO LOAN.
Office over Citizen's National Bank.
SEW ULM, MINNESOTA
HxKSIurtj,
H.A. SuBiixa,
R.
75) 1 501 3 00
3 75
600
10 00
CHAS. Rooe.
NewUlmCityMill,
Centre Street, New Ulm, Minn.
We are running day and night, and can supply
any quantity of best brands of Flour at
regular rites on short notice.
We have improved machinery for the grinding
of shorts and fodder, having: added
a stone reserved for such
a purpose.
Flour exchanged for wheat an very liberal
terms.
BROW N CO BAM,
Cor. Mum. and Centre Streets.
HEW ULM, MINNESOTA.
Collections and all business pertaining
to banking
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILTIT
#500,000.
O
pifiSl
Meat Market,
M. EPPLE, PBO**. i-i
A large supply of fresh meats, sausage,
hams,) laxdf, et ct- etc constantly on
iSMMV MMV*MM VV1WMH1WJ Uj
band. All orders from the coon,
try promptty attended to.
CASH PAID FOB HIDES.
MINN. BTBfET,
4
fFEFFERLE,
4 50j
6 00 1
i nod
1 25 2 00
3 00 4 00
500j 700
8 0012 00 16 00)30 00|50 00
Advertisements in double column, double
the single column rates.
Business cards of five lines, one year $5.00,
each additional line 75 cts.
All transient tdvertiHearenta to be paid for
in advance.
Advertisements inserted in the local notice
columns, 10 cents a line for the first insertion
and 5 cents a line for each subsequent inser
tion but no notice inserted for less than fifty
cents.
Announcements of Marriages and Deaths
Inserted free but obituary notices, except in
special cases, will be charged at advertsing
fates.
Legal notices will be charged 75 cents per
folio for the first insertion, and 37 cents per
folio for each subsequent insertion. All legal
notices must be upon the responsibility of the
Attorney ordering them published, and no af-
SEWT7LM.M2NS
**?&
Dealer
GROCERIES and PROVISIONS.
Canned, Dried and Green Fruit,
VEAUB AND RED,
8TOITB, Woorasr AN TTIIXOW WAKB.
MTNN.ST., NEW ULM, MINN.
TUTEAT MARKET,
6 lyr
900
10 00
10 00(16 00
10 00 30 00
F*
QUTNCY.
MAXCTACTUHBS A3TD DKALBS IH
Harness, Collars, Saddles,
Saddlery,
Importers and Wbolesal Dealers in
LIQUORS
WINES,
98 W. Ski St, 8T. PAUL, MINN.
N
OYES BROTHERS & CUTLER,
ray &* $ ,v i *jw^
VOLUME I. NEW ULM, WEDNESDAY, NOT.?*.6th, 1878.
STUEBE Prop'r.
A large supply of fresh meats, sausage, hams
lard, etc., etc., constantly on band. All orders
from the country promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
MINN. ST, NEW ULM, MINN.
Blankets,
etc.,
Whips,
etc., etc.
Upholstery and all custom work pertaining
to my business promptly attended to.
Minn. St, opposite Union House,
NEWULM, MINN.
M.
JUENEMANK,
lIAXCTACrCBBB A)T& DBAUd IB
Harnesses, Collars,
Saddles, Whips,
Saddlery, Blankets,
etc., etc., etc.
Upholstery, and all custom work pertaining
to my business promptly attended to.
Minn. St Next Door to ZiherH Saloon,
NEWULM.
S t. Vail AvrtteMMit.
T3ENZ&BICHT,
WHOLESALE
DRUGGISTS, 8T. PAUL,
JOHXBBLX.
J.
NEW ULM MILL CO.
YL CHXDBOURW,
B.HCEGEB&80NS,
Importers and Wholesale
BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS
& BLANK BOOK
Manufacturers, &
MILWAUKEE WIS.
I GOETZ.
C. H. Boss,
Ctshier.
President.
ADOLPH XEINEKE.
C.PENZHO^T.
&
MEINECKE
Importers and Jobbers of
Toys,FaacyGoodsJaakee Notions
WILLOW WARE* CHILDREN'S CARRIAGES.
No. 02 HURON ST. MILWAUKEE, WIS.
J.
JEENEKE8&BBC,
HAJrUYA.CTOSI9Sl
CONFECTIONERS,
and dealers ia
NUTS,GBE NFBU1TS,
851 EAST WATER 8T. S MrLWAtTIEE.OCAIROStrait
UNION
CUTLEE WOBKS
Mannfaetnrera and Whokaale Daakra ta\
emery, 6I BS
The Elections.
Republicans t5enepally Victorious.
Oro-w 01d.DBird.,Cro-w!
Minnesota Elects all Three
Rep. CongressmenStrait
by at least 1000.
Butler defeated in
chusetts.
Republicans Carry State and
Legislative Ticket in
New York.
St. Paul, Nov. 6,1878.
(Special telegrams to Review^
Republican State ticket nearly
the usual majority, as near as can be
judged. All three Republican Con
gressmen elected. Strait by at least
one thousand. West St. Paul gives
Strait 54 majority. Gain of 87.
St. Paul gives Donnel
ly 250 majority. Minneapolis gives
Washburn 3600 majority. Ramsey
connty elects two Democratic coun
ty officers. Passavant is defeated.
Other States show large Republic
an fgains. Butler is defeated in
I Massachusetts* Republicans carry
State and Legislative ticket in New
York.
REDWOODCO.
REDWOOD FALLSStrait 152,Po3h-
ler 99, Helling 123, Birum 3.
LAMBERTONStrait 43,Pcehler 12,
Helling 43, Birum 12.
NORTH HEROStrait 42, Pcehler
12, Helling 38, Birum 16.
SPRINGDALEStrait21,Pcehler 17,
Helling 22, Birum 17.
LYON CO.
MARSHALLStrait 128,Pcehler 77,
Helling 153, Birum 53.
TRACYStrait 48, Pcehler 15,
Helling 59, Birum 4.
MENNEOTAStrait 30 Pcehler 6,
Helling 35, Birum 1, Powers 36.
NICOLLET CO.
ST. PETERStrait 225,Pcehler 192,
OSHAWAStrait 45, Pcehler 30.
NICOLLETStrait 31, Pcehler 67.
LAFAYETTEStrait 52, Pcehler 22,
Klossner for Representative 71,
Bean 3. Miller for Senator 74.
WEST NEWTONStrait 27, Poeh
ler 41.
FORT RIDGELYStrait 16, Poehler
none.
SHAKOPEEWhitcomb 91, Black
307, Strait 201, Pcehler 202.
CARVERWhitcomb 52, Black 65
Strait 54, Poehler 67.
BELL PLATNEWhitcomb: 55,
Black 262, Strait 71 Poehler 246.
ZtfMBROTA57 majority for Major
Strait.
REEDS LANDINGWhitcomb 66,
Black34, Strait71, Poeler 29.
WATERVTLLEStrait 60,Poeler 42,
LE SuEUR^Strait 133, Poehler 142.
FARMINGTONStrait 107, Poehler
139.
HASKAWnitcomb 39, Black
196, Strait 41, Poehler 194. r"
NORTHPIELDStrait 283, Poehler
93, Chamberlain 75, Stearns 8.
SOTIAWAStrait
Iasks
and Renriieis.
tlATJLADSTBIET
66,Poehler36.
BIRD ISLAND38 Majority for
Strait, ffi*-* #W^*?r^
^'^x*^
21, Poehler 25.
The Mankato Beview states that
the total cost of bridges built and in
course of erection in Blue Earth Co.
is $106,436.16. Of this amount
Mankato has paid and will pay 126,-
360.75. In return for that the city
the county to assist in building
^M%jfor to* benefit 110,000.
N -it "s?
Gen. Grant has notified General
Sherman that he has given up his
trip around the world and that after
a snort run into Africa he will. re
turn to Paris, where he will remain
until his departure for home.
New York Evening Poet, 38th.
Massa-
3
Serious Illness of Bayard Taylor.
It has been known in this country
for some months that Mr. Bayard
Taylor, the United States minister
to "Germany, has been suffering from
ill health but the report to-day that
he has undergone a surgical opera
tion for dropsy will no doubt produce
some alarm among his many friends.
Aside from any personal feeling in
the matter, it will be a matter of
general regret|if by any falling away
of physical strength Mr. Taylor shall
be prevented ot writing his life of
Goethe. Among scholars-his appoint
ment to his present post ofoffice was
regarded as almost a providential
opportunity for the performance of
his work and although no onemake
thought that he wonld neglect one
jot or title of his official duty for the
purpose of accomplishing this well
known object of his literary ambi
tion, there was good ground to hope
that his untiring industry, his liter
ary facility and nisj^abundent quali
fications for the work would enable
him to perform it without encroach
ing upon the public service which
demanded his first attention. Fur
ther news of his condition will be
looked for with anxious sympathy.
SENATOR KERffAJPSKEWS.
Tbe Greenback^Party and Reeamp
cion The Party Short-Lived.
Interview in New York Tribune.
"What do you think of the future
prospects of the greenback party?"
hfc asked.
"I think it owes all its strength
to the business depression of the
country and to the fact that men in
such times are willing to jump at
anything for a change. As? to the
party, it will soon die out, in rfiy
opinion, and will be of no practical,
importance in the next presidential
campaign. I think by that time the
Pemocratic party in all parts of the
country will be ready to unite on a
strong hard money platform. That
will be the natural result of return
of national prosperity.*'
"What do you regard as the prin
cipal basis of returning property?"
"Success of the resumption act in
producing a stable, unvarying cur
rency or medium of exchange, on
which the welfare of the masses of
our people depends. I do not think
this law was the best for the object
and for the country which could
have been devised. The secretary
of the treasury should have been
authorized much earlier to begin to
redeem outstanding legal tender
notes,but the effect of that law has
been to bring our currency up to par
with gold coin, substantially, and to
make resumption a practicable
thing on the first of January next."
aw.
STARVING HIMSELF.
A Keokuker Vowa to Stp Eating
A Remarkable Case.
Keokuk Telegram, 29, to the Pioneer Press.'
.Avery remarkable case has just
come to light in this city. Some
time since a German, named Conrad
Knapp, a carpenter employed in the
carshops of the Keokuk & Des Moines
railroad, became possessed with an
insane idea that he and his family
were destined to starve to death. He
grew despondent, and refused to eat
anything except an apple occassion
ally. He finally declared that he
would eat no more and for fifteen
days not a morsal of food or a drop
of water has passed his lips. He is
also sleepless, not having taken off
his clothes, or gone to bed for over
four weeks. He sits in his chair
night and day, and, when overcome
from exhaustion, dozes for ten
orPaul,
fifteen minutes, but never longer.
Every meanshas been usedto induce
him to take nourishment and medi
cine, but he stubbornly refuses. Hie
has been constantly watched tosee if
IheeatBanvthiugonthesly, but is
HTOMBER4.5
found that he does not. He is very
much reduced, and although a large
man when well now weighs less
than 100 pounds. His flesh is dry
and wrinkled, end stomach shrunk
en so that he does not measure more
than five or six riches through. He
was in very comfortable circum
stances, and there w?s no reason to
believe thatfiewould be reduced to
want. He is apparently rational up
on all subjects except that of. starv
ing, and upon this he is a mono-*
maniac. His physician says that
food would do hnrmogoodnow, even
shouldhe decidetotakeit, and thinks
he cannot live more than two or
three days at the most.
Chinese Bon't Propose to Co.
Kwang Chang Sing In au Frscclaco Paper.
I believe that I iiave said enough
to show wire the Chinese should qpt
go. It JLS only necessary to advert
to the enormous interest which they
have built up in this country to
it clear that they cannot go
and I may add that., if it becomes
necessary for iham to appeal to all
Christendom, and ev^n to arms a
gainst your injustice, they are pre
pared to do so. They did not seek
Western intercourse they did not ask
for the Burlingame treaty but, now
that both have been trust upon them,
they are determined that both shall
be respected. They will not be driv
en foyth. It must sound strangely
to hear a Chinaman speak of resort
ing to arms to obtain the observance
of a treaty. It is strange, but it ia
your method, the method of your
boasted western civilization. You
have taught it to ns, and we shall
employ it. It may also seem prepost
erous on our part to speak of arms
when you believe we have none.
But here you are mistaken.
Barest*w items^
SAD ACCIDENCEMr. Lampie and
his team were found dead in theLittle
Cottonwood river, near this place. Mr.
Lampie left this place four orfivedays
ago- very much under the, influence of
liquor, and, it is supposed, while in
this state drove OTer the bank and
hoth Mmsell ar4 the ta^ai drowned in
Shree feet of wate.%
The farmers, as usual, are busy haul
ing grain to market, bu'i as in every
other locality the '-little brass kettles'
e up a continuous broiL
Though getting late in the season
emigration continues westward both,
by team and rail, all answering the
eastern motto: "Young men go west."-
The stock trade continues lively.
M. H. Gamble shipped to the Chicago"
markets a few car loads of fat cattle.
Henry Dressier does the buying for
Mr. Gamble.
MARRIEDOn the second inst., at
this place, by Chas Scott, fo P Mr.
William "W. Kelly to Harret A. Mur
phy, both of Sleepy Eye.
Prairie fires still illuminatethe skies
in this vicinity nearly every night.
Mrs. Lucy A. Wellcome, of Sleepy
Eye, is now among us and intends
starting ajnillinery store just what
we want.
AN UNDENIABLE TRUTH.
You deserve to suffer, and if you lead-4
a miserable, unsatisfactory Hfe in this
beautiful world, it isentirely yourown
fault and there is only one excuse for'
you,your unreasonableprejudice and
skepticism,whichhas killedthousands.
Personal knowledge and common sense.
reasoning will soon show you that
Green's August Flower will cureyouof
Liver Complaint, or Dyspepsia, with
all its miserable effects, such as sick
headache, palpitation of the heart, sour
stomach, habitual costiveness, dizzi
ness of the head, nervous prostration,
low spirits, &c. its sale now reach
every town on the Western Continent
and not a Druggist but will tell you of
its wonderful cures. You can buy a
Sample Bottle for 10 cents. Three "v*
doses will relieve you. For sale by
Jos. Bobleter.
We have made arrangements with
the .Publisher of the MINNESOTA
FARMER, anillustrated, life and vig
orous agricultural monthly, of 32 pag
es, published at Minneapolis and St.
H. E. Newton, Editor, Minneapo
lis,whereby we are enabled to furnish
both it and the NEW ULM REVIEW
at the low rate of $2.00 a year, post-,
age pre-paid, cash in advance. SpecK
men copies of the FARMER max ba,
seen at this office. '^Sv
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