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New Ulm weekly review. [volume] (New Ulm, Minn.) 1878-1892, December 25, 1878, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY
JOS, BOBLETER.
Office over City Drag Store.
TERMS:
O NE DoiiLAB PE YEAS IN ADVANCE.
BATHS OS" ADTEBflSINU.
Ten Lines "BREVIER makes a Square.
Space
1 Square
2 Squares
ji Column
& Column
1 Column
M,
1 1 1 3m 6m
75j
1251 3 00
5 001 7 0010
8 00 12 00
Harnesses, Collars,
lyr 9 00
00 00
00 00
1 501 3 00
2 00
4 00
4 50
3 751 6 0010
6 00 10 0016
00 16 0030
16 00 SO 0050
JUENEMANN,
MANUTACTUBBR AND DEALER 131
Saddles, Whips,
n.
Saddlery, Blankets,
etc., etc., etc.
Upholstery, and all custom work pertaining
to my business promptly attended to.
Minn. St., Next Door to Ziher's Saloon,
NEW ULM.
PFEFFEKLE,
Dealer in
GR0GER4ES and PROVISION'.
Canned, Dried and Green Fruit,
F?4)UR AND FEED,
STONB, WoonitiT AND TTIL,IA TTAHB.
MINN. ST., NEW ULM, MINN.
|3 F. WEBBEK,
1
A.ttorney &> 'Counselor
AT LAW.
HONEY O LOAN
Office over Citizen's National Bank.
JTEW ULM, MINNESOTA
jTVAKOTA HOUSE,
DPI*. POST OFFICKN EW TJLM, MIITN..
ADOLPH SETTER, PKOP'K.
hia house is the most centrally located
house in the city and affords good
Sample Rooms.
c,
H. CHADBOURN,
President.
TUT-BAl1
C.H. Rosa,
Cashier.
BROWN CO. BANK
Cor. Minn. and Centre Streets.
NEW ULM, MINNESOTA.
Collections and all business pertaining
to banking
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
INDIVIDUAL RESPQNSlBiLTlY
#500,000.
& tx. A\ SrjBinu, JOCK BELV.
NewUlm CityMill,
Centre Street, New Ulm, Minn
We are running day and night, and can supply
any quantity of best brands of Flour at
regular rates,pa, short notice.
"We have improved machinery for the grinding
of Bhorts and fodder, having added
a stone reserved for such
a purpose.
Jrtour exchanged for wheat very liberal
terms.
"'..NEWULM CITY MILL CO.
MAKlvtl',
C. STUEBE, Prop'r.
A large supply offresh meats, sausage, hams
lard, etc., etc., constantly on hand. All orders
ffom the country promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR AIDES.
MINN.ST NEW ULM, MINN.
TTY 7~
Me&t Msirket,
M. EPPLE, PBOP'JC
A large supply of fresh meats, sausage,
hams, lard, etc., etc., constantly on
hand. All orders from the coun
try promptly attended to.
CASH PAID FOR HIDES.
lfl^N, ST^BET. NEW.ULM. MIN^
nffrlfli.
*zT2ZZ3ritS2
YOLUME I. KEW ULM, MEOT., WEDNESDAY, DEC. 25th, 187&$.
FUBNITIURE
AT
As times are hard and money scarce, I have con
cluded to sell my large stock of Furniture for cost,
The assortment embraces Bedsteads, Bureaus,
Kocking- and other Chairs, Cupboards, etc. This is
a rare opportunity to obtain all kinds of Furniture
cheap.
I will also dispose of my Farmers' Friend
Fanning" Mills for cost, which enables farm
ers to obtain these popular mills at a very low
price.
S C. HELD,
Center street, near City Mill.
Chean For Cask
I ofl'er my large and in every way best assorted
stock of Drv Goods, Ready-made Clothing, Ladies'
Cloaks, Ladies' and Gent's Underwear, Buffalo
Coats and Robes, Fur Goods for Ladies, Hats and
Caps. Mittens, Blankets, Groceries, Crockery and
Glassware, which are equal in quality to any in the
city, sit prices that cannot be beat.
My stock of
Ready-Made Clothing wi51 fee closed
out at Cost.
Heavy Gent's Overcoats at $3.00.
Buffalo Overcoats from $8.50 to $20.
Underskirts fr om 2Sets, to S4.0Q
GMJs
Hats From 50 cts. to $4.00'
Buckskin Mittens and Gloves from
25 cents to $2.00'.
C. BALTRUSCH,
NEW TJLM, MINS.
JL-
Dealers in
DRY GOODS,
GROCERIES, READY
MADE CLOTHING, HATS,
CAPS, BOOTS & SHOES,
LADIf S AND
GENTS UNDERWEAR,
NOTIONS, TRIMMINGSr
&c. &c. &c. "&c. &c
Highest market price paid fo^
arm produce.
Sleepy Eye, Minn.
HAIR WORK.,.
Ornamental hair jewelry, such as
charms, chains, pins, ear-rings, brace
lets, rings and all kinds of solid work,
promptly made to owler. Combings
50 cents an ounae.
'MRS* K. PICKER,
Centre Sir., New TJlm, Minn,
HARNESS SHOP.
I would "respectfully inform the people of New
Ulm and vicinity that I have opened a Harness Shop
in the rear end of my Hardware Store, under the
management of my son-in-law Fr.Quense. A good
and well assorted stock of harnesses, saddles, col
lars, whips, blankets, etc. will be constantly kept
on hand and sold at bottom figures. Fr. Quense
will take pleasure in waiting upon all his old cus
tomers. Upholstery.and all kinds of custom work,
promptly attended to.
if. BEUSSJWAKnV.
CENTRE STREET
SAMPLE ROOM & BILLIARD HALL,
IN BASEMENT OF
2SHesling"s ZBlocls:.
The best of Wines, Liquors and Ci
gars constantly kept on hand.
Louis Ffllkei. Prop'r.
A.Y UPAll persons indebted to
me are kindly requested to call and
settle their accounts on or before Jan
uary first next, and thereby save costs.
All accounts not paid by January first
will be placed in the.hands of an attor
ney ior collection. THEO. CRONE*.
BOP AD SHOE STORED
3B oh e,"while,s
y. \j \1rtf DEALER 1ST 'M-M'**
BOOT S & SHOES,f
Minnesota Street, Ne^Ulmt:,
i*\A large assortment of,
en's boots
and shoes and ladies' a:
shoes constantly kept on ha^T6Jffato)|CL
work and repairing promptly
attendeding
to.
lOR SALE Four or five improved
farms, in this andNicollet county.
For particulars enquire of
TJTEO. CRONE^
For the first time sirme 1862 gold
sold at par in New York last week
Tuesday. Sherman has $135,000,
000 of gold coin ready to pay over
the treasury counters one week from
to-day. The way to resume is to re
sume.
'i^$i7jv0-
Major Strait last week introduced
in Congress a bill appropriating
$150,000 to test the. Adams fleume
for deepening the channel of the
Mississippi,, and also a bill granting
additional rights to homestead set
tlers.
The Mankato Review states that
the physicians of that city, as near
as could be ascertained, reported 350
cases.of diphtheria in the city from
the first of July up to to the first of
December, and the deaths between
the same dates number forty-eight.
The death rate being only" about
thirteen and a half per cent, is con
sidered very low, when the severe
character of the disease is taken in
to account.
The New York Tribune in its
prospectus this year recounts fairly
enough Its work during t^ie late cam
paign, and then warns the Republi
can party that the victories this Fall
would have been reversed if the
Green backers and Democrats had
united. In" ~the possibility of this
union, it thinks, lies the danger of
the immediate future. It is un
doubtedly right, therefore, in sum
moning Republicans to the contin
ued work of educating voters by the
diffusion of sound political princi
ples. The Tribune's services in the
campaign were so influential, that
its counsels now deserve especial at
tention. It presents an attractive
programme of its owji for the next
year,, and. its premiums are particu
larly dazzling. See its prospectus
on fourth page of this week's Re-
view.-
Cable dispatches from Europe give
accounts of great suffering among
the laboring classes ofGreat Britain,
especially 'Scotland and England. In
manufacturing towns there are
thousands of suffering men, women
and children who have been com
pelled to apply to the authorities for
shelter from the severe weather and
for food to stay their hunger. In
Glasgow, Scotland, the streets are
said to be swarming with starving
people, and that relief measures are
far from sufficient to supply the
wants.
In England large numbers of
manufucturies, mills and mines are
closed, and consequently there are
hosts of unemployed workingmen.
Manufacturers have been conduct
ing their business at a loss for years,
and many of them have been com
pelled to suspend operations for want
of means. A million of looms and
lathes that were in full blast three
years ago are now lying idle, while
Jarge manufacturies are rotting down
from disuse. If this state of affairs
is to continue for any length of time,
there is danger of a communistic
outbreak which may lead to serious
results.
A correspondent of the Pioneer
Press writing from Marshall, Lyon
Couty, compliments Judge Cox on
the excellent charge which he gave
to the grand jury at that place dur
ing the late session of the district
court, especially that part relating
to the selling of intoxicating liquors
to minors. The result of that
charge was that every saloon keeper
in Marshall was indicted and placed
under bonds for trial, which is set
for January 21st.
In hi charge the Judge states that
while the law permits a man
make a brute of himself and paupers,
or worse, of his wife and family, it
attempts to throw a feeble guard a
roiind the child in the tender years
of infancy that punishment certain
find swift ought to follow and ,be
inflicted on* every violator of that
^tftt^W^
rt v,vr~T.
^iXOren'sM iamiMs\ W
cause them to take from the widowed
moihers' arms the stay aud support
of age and virtue, and with fiery
drink madly plunge him into a fel
on's grave. If the law were rigidly
enforced by proper complaint
and punishment, crime and vice
would decrease at a rate that would
astonish the most furious fanatic on
the subject of enforced temperance,
and jails would yawn for inmates
with those who learn to "look upon
the wine while it is red," in the days
of early youth."
Death of Bayard Taylor.
Bayard Taylor, United States
minister to Germany, died at Berlin
last Thursday afternoon, after an
illness of several months' duration.
Mr.a Taylor was nearly 54 years of
age at the time of his death, having
been born in Pennsylvania in 1825.
At an early age he learned the print
er's trade, and while working at the
case he imbibed such a taste for lit
erature, that he employed his leisure
hours in. studying and writing
verses, which he published in
1844. In 1844 and 1846 he made
a pedestrian tour in Europe,
an account of which he published*
in 1845. entitled "Views Afoot."
He traveled on foot through France,
Germany, Austria, Italy, and other
European countries, his trip costing
about $500. which he earned by
writing letters to a New York jour
nal. He became connected with the
New York Tribune in 1847. He
has traveled through California,
Egypt, Syria, Asia Minor, Europe,
India, Japan, and Iceland, and has
written about twenty volumes of
travels and poetry. He has also
been engaged in the lecture field,
having lectured upon modern litera
ture at Cornell: Fni v#si^ asi %iibh
resident professor. His latest and
greatest work is a translation of
Faust, which was published in 1875.
At the time of his death he was en
gaged upon a life of Goethe. His
appointment as minister to Germany
was made last year by President
Hayes.
FLUCTUATIONS OF INDUSTRY.
Written for'the Review by O. P. CHAMPLIST.
The industries of the land fluctu
ate. Sometimes .there is an over
production, and then the wave of
the great industrial ocean ebbs a
gain, there is an increased demand,
the wave flows in towards the la
boring class and work is. plenty and
wages good.
Sometimes the fluctuatiou is caus
ed by anew invention, such as many
used in manufacturing, or in agri
culture at the present day. Changes
of fashions, also, are disturbing el
ements and, even natural causes
may produce a marked effect upon
industry. ^\x/
!& Wsrkingmen are liable to be dis
turbssd in their labor bjr
ance. amo:
tudes who
afSng the.
facture of{
ot emplo
changed, those en
sof crinoli:
society and
tha
1' i|^|d from the hor-
^^^AMJ^:tit^gL\^^
reek
through the^eeWlalfeeldeliri
um.. ,of intexicatiofiy
homes and bleeding hear^-|^\ise3"|
the open, 'frequent ^nd tiotoriovTs
violations of la^teC^^.-wHofee
avaricious lust tJ "^Hftix-^^iuld
eontrolled'
fluctuate
tal can stoj
stances bot^
injuriou|'
dustry
any one or
all of these causes.
It occasionally happens that in
dustries that have supported
thousandsglcomepi to an end.
We are told that when shoe ribbons
were substituted for buckles it was
long felt to be a severe blow by
Sheffield and Birmingham. When
it was the fashion for a woman to
surround herself with a congeries of
parallel steel hoops, fifty tons of cri
noline \&ere turned out weekly from
the factories, chiefly in Yorks-hire.
A few years ago women dressed
themselves plentifully" in ribbons
but now the fashion has changed
and where there is now one yard
sold hund^ds used to be. All these
changes, v^iich might be further il
lustrated, g|oduce a marked disturb
workingmen. Multi
ained a living by oper
looms in the imyiu
ibbon were thrown out?,
ent when the fashion
A like calamity befell
ged in the. manufacture
ie. It will beseen at once
.that manjEcauses operating to throw
men oxxt 6s*vork cannot be very well
Industry is bound to
neither labor nor capi
and -in many in
or and capital are
ected. When an in
to an endthe machine-.
ry must be remodeled to produce
something else, or remain in idleness
Jlimself
"ust as the operator must betake
to some other occupation or
do nothing at all. But respecting
the operative the change is not so
easily effected. One who is skilled
in*one trade, and has worked at it
jr years, does npt turn to another
without difficulty. Nor is it always
convenient for the laborer, who has
been thrown out of employment, we
will say by. business failure, to move
into some other community where
he may pursue the same avocation.
There are hindrances of one nature
and another hard to be overc'ome,and
especially, if the laborer has a fami
ly. Here now is a state of things
which must be duly considered by
all parties in the present discussion.
Capital is not responsible for inven
tive genius nor must labor put its
fopt on the neck of the young chihj
it "brings forth. Every improving
invention must be given a chance
indeed, .we need not qualify for it is
only as, an invention has a trial that
we can tell, "wether it is.an improve
ment or.not. Capital is not respon
sible for a change of fashion but it
often causes great distress among the
working classes. Here is something
for the laborer to bear in mind. On
the other hand, when the laborer,
the husbandman, for instance, is dis
tressed in his industries by natural
causes capitalist should make a note
ofit.
In truth the fluctuations of indus
try offer to both classes the oppor
tunity to exercise mutual forbear
ance. The theme is suggestive and
particularly so when' you cure to
competition in labor but this aspect
of the case I care not now to go in
to. My present object will be at
tained if I cause any one to be more
mindful of the chance.elements that,
enter, or positive factors, into the
case between the laborer and the
capitalist. The distress and the
misery of the workingman does not
lie always at the door of the man of
wealth. ^rf/^'f
Burnstown Item**
Merry Christmas to om' Burnstown
friends.
Turkeys have come down from their
roosts and gone up in the market.
Collecting agents are to. be seen a
round almost daily. .%S||^
Ourschool is now in good running
order, but the school room is already
found to be too small, ts
The Springfield string' band spends
considerable timein practicing dancing
music.
The writer would suggest al iterary*
association for the long winter nights.x
Don't all speak at once.
Last Monday was a mighty cold day
up in this seetion, but if we only had
snow enough to make decent sleighing
we wouldn't complain.. 'I^V-f^^
The grain trade continues tolerably,
lively. We would like to see more op~
position in the market here.
The ladies of our town the last few
days have been more than busy pre
paring for our Christmas festival.
Lamberton wants a flouring mill.
Well, so do we, and we want a good
torisorial artist and a merchant tailor
besides.
The recent change oftime on the W.
3k St. Peter railroad is a benefit to us,
and we ape not disturbed now during
dinner hour. Thanks to the Company.
John G. Parsons'left last Saturday
with several car loads- of cattle which
he had taken in exchange for his hors
es. We are sorry to see John go, as he
is a jolly good fellow. .V-j gy.
Henry Dressier ha returned from ,|"i
Chicago and reports the cattle trade h.
fair. He is in the fteld roady to^buy
again. $$&
John Hauenstein of JTew Ulm made
our town a pleasaat call last week..
John is a liberal good hearted fellow
and we are always glad to see him.
It's all a mistake about John Dooner
being a happy daddy of anew boni
babyK'John Whelan is the happy
chap." But what's the odds so long aa
the new born bad'smaroie.is John.
These sudden changes of tSe^wvath-.
er seldom,? ail-to* bring |M3ough or
Cold, and, j^e ca reqoxepiend Dr..
Marshall'^ fng ^yrupfafP|a certain
cure for aft'diseasesof the.J^mg an
Chest? The price isjwily|?25 cents-,
Soldat the^pity Drugs^i
*&?$*
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