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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, April 15, 1897, Image 6

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89065008/1897-04-15/ed-1/seq-6/

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tw
Y/'
fir
w
Î
!
<>T NOW,mowe. Ly
biul'linif leaf
Aü'I flower unfol't
Inir bright
j
;
■f.
We
h
A th* «II- j
very laper» burn.
Anil < hantln»: < hoir*
In full
Whi)
Habite the
inn)«,«.
n Lord!
* " i
For ftototr mi.
In shadow
thlnr we ha<l,
Th*- twIltiK vision nf
I lear VOl ex hllHhml, <Je
ÏV»r b
tr.ru y
life RC
of Ho- inix*e<l awny,
d have
dr.
handx unKraxi.e'd,
•huM
ok. fi link* >
I
blndln»'. kith
That In f.*
fiivh
Tha f
o*pt in
-I* o
l ie. w,|A|e
empty «Ile
with whirry Ilia
• r y»
. hi*
j I
'hi' - *
N
in.« h*ht.
U> ijr* . i the I.■ I . »
Our lib»'» bio«
H*«*l fietdx are
It en" rw
And he
Wh«
' tie I Id»*,
le't
de.
Unit '*fb
:
-•e pal a a/
velrM of
j
Km
>lt find
»ay.
day.
xilll e«ju
.. f .».*
the t
Ar».i love Hint «
TN
\l > ,
AI si «v
*ti, If but, non-ne and »till,
accept
.rt.'d, uplift
will,
pHii Ita,
..Ill.U'a
-<iu*a o*)u », tbe I .
bfiltn.
And .i.
Or)«*
That Me wh
Folder! ».rpj fair n
May com«
Tha t n y«- His hi
Mi»y Unfit Him
And
In tu*
The ntithetiis b. the rlsun I.urd
I 1 . Himasttfr, In i
, I») ev
tv r r Iitnii;li 1 <
fu
tut In.** lay
Km I
dii
I
bo
•i.
him* /ill u
Kmn( er llllc« I»!
l-ili« wl! h full ivntnl
la
/
i
—Mure, a i o
•hlettgi
In
W 0 M ftYîfé
41
N \ /
Y)tc'\0f,y t }tory>
K
TT
I
K toi; uian.NOH,
capitalist, trnv«der,
n of the
d cvnic.
critic, m;
wm
w
1 the ringing
He
/JJ of the bell of the
î q u n i il 1
iill
trdioivh. <«, 'id it leenlled tender memories
Mie duy» of his youth.
ing it» sound lie reached the
edifice, which stood in the midst of a
neglected graveyard full
«uoiim, many of which were falle
'tiroken in pieces. Tangles of lundi and
1*7» 11
tu 1er were
■very limid
fbifei ing tie* linu
lu* fourni to In* nlrnuly filled, he
IHtly look
*li*i lh«* gallery of the choir.
The «lav wax Kinder,
oaken ultnr bore large vnses of
flowei-K. whose frtigrnuce hail sloleo all |
of woiHhip, which
Ml
•at near the ,|
■ nnd un
I the plain
■ret
er the auilieuee
and made the !
*»•• of the April moniing grateful
I»» presence.
Soon the little
it li
organ «ent forth n
a prelude, Mid the
Hut iu a mo
f**«l annoutielng
J'Ming man looked bored.
*»»• nt lie »»Mimed ;
attentive, rapt nt
of glad Httnshitie
ttitiide, nnd tippl
|>l.iy ed
A voice of
it hin the
er his fenturcK.
et ness
•a tig
arrow walls of tin*
It was full, rich, clear, di
expression.
Ilmilnor (hmitflit nf thv miffi'I roiir
•«•■0» l * l»-«n. ... I ,
* .T*'"? !"" K .*«*t nll.l^l.t , ow
llu* glorious harinonies he lost to!
tnm.
out
•umettiary,
tine almost, in its
,, ... . , but
»»•did not think of the singer, wheth-!
°, ,,r .1 ( uing, nor of the triumphant bed
m-onls of the hymn she
lu*r voice,
aofhitdike in It»
It was ; pcMH
III II» i-nrnemioM, j
human,
sang.
»IX
«V?
, ul
,
was
4tllB
mis
hi.
intern.
fines», vet
mUtat. that k«d entered hl» »mil.
Themeforth he had
heart for the
prayers, nor the words that were read,
nor the ne.ruum that
unk
for
spoken.
one iu n deep sleep, from w
lie only roused who
He
K/l
•Inch
the ineffable
rang out In II» rich cadences. Ollier»
tiling led with It, but these he did not
I* «Mr.
Wliei
tin* service!
.ade his way to the village inn.
n stopping during the
There he inquired of the
Lindlord concerning the owner of the
•»<* ended he
•Jowly
here he had bee
eek.
past
fix
Boniface was a fat, v
whose thoughts on me »1
s slower. Hriulnor found it
I worn
; v
j
been
he«'/y fellow.
and whose
JS| **•«'<• I»
su cessa ry to repeat the qi
"She's Mr«. Kitty Travis,
came the reply, "wife oT Tim I r.i\i
w ho-"
-t ion.
si.
"O. the deuce 1" ejaculated the young ! ro:
*»um. a* he turned disappointedly* mw:iv. j "h°
The landlord stated at him with hist
front goggle eye* in astonishment and ! h"|>*
movement to call him I 'yi*'
of
u tump to
buck, but Bradnor h id disappeared
Several times during
tin* afternoon and evening the host
»uyed speech with his guest, but wi
halting iu purpose that he nev
l«*« 1.
fr
that
the
of
the room.
(hm't.
taste,
or
Itnidm
for bis home i
tlir
took an early morning train
Haiti more, nnd when
rose the hills around the little
Virginia vlllnifo »«rt far lx'hi ml him.
lttit hr took ,villi him i, memory of Gulf
,,hire, fresher ami sweeter aud purer
than Ihr while lilies Unit grew ill '
«irlaiire ii|k>h either aille of the run,In
(hr voice of s woman In the Ivy
mantled village elmreh.
"t ocfoiintl If," he imittered, "and the
ow ner of It is inarrir.1! Ves, ami doiiht
lrss gray and old and wrinkled. What
Iwiie v
but
had
It n
the
rind woman, or anything else that lit*
Knig-s to her, Victor Hrmluor?"
Still, though he sneered and reproved ' li ' 1
himself, the voice quickened nnd sent "'I'.'*
out repeated melodies in the great chain 1
l»r of his thought». "
««.'•«,, terrd
White Sulphur Spring, was filled with ' 5"
|*eop1e from all over the country iuid
nmong the throngs was Victor llriidnor,
i'f",he' ellTanS ^ «Äi «tim« 1
opiireased hlfn.
The etening w« a delightful one In tlia.
August, and llradnor was seated upon
tbe vtrumla of iii* hotel, holding high j with
to ti
ith the voice of
ur
It;
dd
rquuinta
net at Florence, and, inter, ;»f
e he
an
had first
u
'■
fhis frb'i d wax languidly telling of
:ni»;tdt eut un* l»<* had on h gondola at
hii'h a f.'iir Venetian maid
figured, punctuated by an involuntary
bath in the blue water«, when, suddenly,
•ide,
hen attentively regarding ;
o one
Î like a d<
! lib
The
Ly
He
tiring of ;
\rrted Id),
terest,
j Again C
have di
from the object of his In
would
;
der ein
rds of
■inory [
big « hext h oi ved j
pumped by n smith. !
f the village ch
■hue«« in n str»*;
«II- j
inched und hi
h j
of j
huge belli
like
The
it.
overwhelming yet Inspiring him '
* " i w It h IU ref * cubing,
! I
c of Hiimrner.'
A
h of siuino
pervaded hcr voie
the !
!»|eh
and th
•arly qui* red
ill
V die declared the
ill» emu
,f
I farines« of the flower find the denth
fe!b
<1 the liquid ton«*« |>onred
itidowH.
•nc he «
le abruptly
j I hrough » 11 »- open
\\ he
ighed 11 e j j v
an ay I
I Hiir- !
i*t> and str
lly,
111
1101
hit
j »r I - ** ujjon
sloofl ii|miii his fee I and »low ly followed J
'I he latter ,»r
his vvny
it il j
be
nf the broad flight of
the very brink
friend drew
Ilii
as about
dd I
h hi
fiel
party of ladies
died fro I
I both gi
if lu permit them
it bin :
I lei
j Missing. I!
hn. i* g;
ui, stepped hnek
nrd, with the re
nting, slipped and
er until he
it t<
/ U.» that h
lost his f.
rolling
i full heavily,
a !udied I he g round.
fly everything
I tint I
non f u
. The friend
ho»«* name
lyn, ran rapidly /low
the
T ■ •'
■d
a si ily le
■ r th/ 1 pr./htrate i:
ivIdle ill/* ladies looked anxiously
nun me piazza. Other guest» v
juiekly attracted to the spot.
Jelly 11.
arils the indies, after he had
d and the wrist of
died the foreh
J
,\
Wm
M
■i
i « *
V
niiim
V
!> 11
m
:
mm
Dt» ti !
ily
/
.X'-A'a!
|
\fr f
, r
A I
hj
, .v
z
*<"
! -r
i\
^41
W/ir
I , lrnf l„ or , -, nm nfrnil , (he dear old fej
, ow ityciulfullV hurt,"
£2^
THREW 111M TO
A physician
s hastily summoned.
but mean time t he injured man hud been
tenderly borne by strong arms to his
bed chamber, lie recovered conscious
; pcMH after some moments and
j careful examination hail keen i
medical
hie i
.
J ,0 Youiiff. » nhu.rt follow with his
»IX fort oMiuiffht am hroa.l .l.oulder», ■
«V? . "r n !7-, A 0 ' r , '*'"'7' " f
, ul mu tee 1.1. a though the pam « w |
, en e ,,, ht. ankle. Hut the
was obdurate, declaring that most sen- /
4tllB , , . „ . •
mis results would Is* likely to follow ,
attempt ii|u,n hi. part toari»» from
hi. he,l for „week. ,,t hast. '
inde the
hones
doeln red that
re broken, hut thatn bndiv-spruined
»uld confine Bradnor to his bed
unk le
for
any day*.
With
groan the man turned hh
0[> , |? ? ..,|
J
fix
the etfeuig of
idministered in h » arm
the effect* «if the* drug '■ ' Laving
I worn away, hut with the :» f'.ernooii hi#
intelligence returned to him
ranging over the room he
j dressing ease
been
The following morning h<
1 fit
Uift «*;
hi*;
of red
• Per- t!,l!
*t of Jer- !
ho had sp* nt the grv-ater part
ly in hi» run. ;
! ro:
"h° had give
thought
h"|>* he thought it
'yi*' s * "
of t he d:
ment he wondered :
>» *<■ h • . t»it I lie i '*
the i
CVill :<
Dav after day, however, he observed
that fre»!
the other». Whet
turned suddenly
thanked him for his
of the flower*.
were supplied to replace
a week had posted, he
upon Jerlyn and I tlie
j and the gift
He was a little,
ho »poke rapidly,
"Didn't know you eared for Vm. 1
(hm't. Cabbages art* much more to my
taste, especially when boiled with bacoli
or beef."
"Flowers, what flowers?" demanded
Jerlyn, nervously,
nervous man,
will
is
"ise
nr.
Hriulnor did not pursue the subject,
but lie brooded over it all the more, lie
had
a!
acquaintance or friend at the
Springs save Jerlyn, and he was sure
the landlord had not provided them.
He was now able to sit i
,lni * 'be doctor bad promised that
within a day or two lie might, with the
' li ' 1 " f l ' vu,cl "'*' lrlm ' >>Is room and
"'I'.'* 1 * " il >i the guests of the hotel,
1 h< ' ,ol, "' vi, *ff morning lie was awake
" hel1 1'rldget, the chambermaid, en
terrd ids l oom aud was surprised to see
5" J.*!?* " CU " ,<!r ° f frcsh n>8e * ln
Äug Z
, , ,
tlia. vnse e'very'mor'nlng 'is it*"'*" flUiDg
"Shure. sor.m,' so"t wör " she remle.1
with a courtesy. * 1
uh
short
I
Mrs.
gin
tion
of
upon
Oïl» V
"Bridget,"
'come here.'
he said, with firmness.
Jo.
the
have
you
;»f
e he
"ïf*. Bridget, now hand me that
pocket book ou the table there. That
■II. Now J want you to tell me who
gave you the roue* to bring in to me."
"llowly wither, «or, an' that 1 will
nlver be afthcr doin'. Mr«. 'J ravin, the ,
leddy, sor. thrit trued me 1 don' know
whntav i «id aw uired uixiut lier, «or—"
of
at
maid
•ide,
That will do, my girl," he said, gen*
; tly. as he placed
bill
her hand».
■x here by my Hide and
The go out of the loom fora little while."
after
"Tin do)J;
'Tied Bridget,
di
In- reaching the hall, **i
'nil because 1
nfthcr refusin' the tillin' av him who
»int. them!
Elm re the kind gintleniau's
: deft."
■inory [
ved j gone elf
smith. !
ized the cluster eagerly
h j and let his nostril* drink in their grate*
of j ful odor. While he did
Hindu
the
lUiory
him ' of the heavenly voice freshened, and he
hear it.
g o'er and over
f flu: Easter day »er
the dear
air* the hyi
:c. Then
A
he listened f
Is of the flower song: " ''ids the Las'.
• of Summer." In a deep re very he
?ml moment»,
the ! after which he opened them again, laid
1 I
red
ill- II
,f closed his eyes for sc
j
it h
the r
ex do
prof'.
land the
Victor Bradnor, y<>
etch, you i
j j v
ay I deeply, desperately
Hiir- ! lote with a human v
the property of
mi foolishly in
e. and that voice
mu rried
J Sh;
A
When he
•i h |s*rmlt.ted to go down
s he inquired for Mrs. Travin. It
it il j si a
for h«'r
!
ild be but ;
•t of propriety r
of
•levy to I hank her i
pet>
sick
kindness to
She had g
1th her
■Hing be- !
K j
lie sa hi, regret- ! '
ay the
fore
other.
I
t
The deuce lake it,'
fully,
I
e her fnc

Wliei
*xt Eisler day <■;
Viet «
re
and
he
Brad nor
• and with th
give emphasis to I
this day of days In the calendar. Brad- i
the glorv-j
ich-toncd
His thoughts were far out and away in j
■red Virginia church, and
he felt that the music of her voice was
that of nil the harmonies
dsof other »attended the
agn! fieri it
at St. Betel
here all the
pomp and circumstances of stately
grand processions and artistic |
combined
f u
nor listened (jensivoly
strains of orgr
and the
ices of the mew and boy» of the choir.
had
of
enter tha
■ h ich echoed in St. Peter's. While the
or
/
fit
u
Dll/
Wm m
i,
In
niiim
up.
wus
the
Iff
!> 11 : l\
A
•rf
ir
J
m
mi m
ML,
Wf. W'h
W
j ink
1 hw
M'fm : I
[
!
l
zur.
r
z
*<" ! I IlfßßS
the
i\
NO
L,(
1
%mfm
'•-/
any
duy.
far
ful
> 7 /
£2^
TO TIIE GROUND.
pealed and voices blended with
happy
day, he thought he could he
divine vocalization above them all, soft
and gentle withal
tide.
"rga
■claim of Resurrection
tion,
as
The
plied
The
the
not
them
her
the zephyr at even
He
glad when the services wee
because their suggestions
brought too freshly before him the
recollections of the Easter day of the
previous year. He felt he must go
through life haunted bv a voice, the
of whi ,. h hednnit not look noon
■ „„„ Hh<) „| (] , le ,. hoaee to meet her, be
f "•>"«• »he »*>** (1*0 wife of another.
| r ns , ;tI(; int0 the „„ter air. he walked
, :tnl „ slv ^ h the obJeet
/ , . , .... .» . * . .
. • h * love, the voice that continued to
, , .. , . .
A ' ' , .' 0,1 11 * i! *
' ' " 1 » **'>*l*l<*» ami
then another.
ended.
J **.t ahead of him a great burly fe!
h«w. a thievish beggar, it would seem,
J wized a woman, an elegantly
vhile her
yeas
\»iil
to
in
he
as
varied
»1res Red lady, by the arm,
companion.
•wautiful female, regarded the
■nth looks of horror uj>on her refined
voung nnd exquisitely
nwin
Striding rapidly forward, Brndnor
died out and grasped the knave,
t ohser ed his approach, by
t!,l! * h roîi t and threw him heavily to the
! «fround. The rascal Jnv stunned for n
nnd, then reviving, gathered
; himself quickly together, and hurried ''ig
av, muttering imprecations us he ^'nt
germs;
not
:
i '* lm 1,11,1
live
staggered along.
*'We had given him money, sir," said
I tlie older of the Indies, "but he de
rnnnded more, all we had, in fact, nnd,
greatly excited ant! was
overcome that she broke fairly down.
"Many of the Romun beggars are very
hold." he said, reassuringly,
by
und--" she vv
but you
will beer no more from him. lint—here
is my card," he said, drawing out his
"ise and handing one to each,
nr. Americans and 1 am an American
Permit me to see you to your
carriage."
—Frank
beauty.
tion
You
a!
"Mamina, that is Mrs. Trenton, wished
uh to take one, but the distance is
short and the day so lovely, headstrong,
I decided we hud better walk.
Mrs. Travis, both of Ingieside, Vir
gin i»»."
The owner of the divine voice! The
charm of it was ns sweet in
tion as in song. Bradnor.
needed c
furtively from time to time.
Mr». Trenton knew of the Bradnor»,
of Baltimore, and invited Victor to call
upon them. This he readily agreed to
so
I am
eon versa
ns they pro
their way, regarded' her
I dar«
on
And
I'll
Jo.
One day ho thanked Mrs. Travis for
the roses she hod sent him. Then she
blushed crimson.
"Why, Mr. Brndnor, what must
you
have thought of my boldness? I did not
know vour name and really thought
you were the old gentleman— -your
hat
fr it?D'J *o *\toUe of you wl«n yoa Hy
upon the ground."
Brad nor laughed heartily. He and the
owner of tiie voice had become much
letter acquainted By this time.
More than this, he had Jerrned from
her mother that «he was a bride of an
hour only, her husband having been
killed in a railroad accident
that
That
who
will
the ,
it hin le**
gen*
• J. after the marriage
than the time n*
ceremony had been performed, fhe
girl-wife escaped uniitj
and
1 re
turned with his dead body from what
Intended to be a happy and ex
This was four years ago,
d
had l)e
who fended tour.
and Kitty was now 22.
"The deuce take it!" murmured Brad
nor, when the mother told him, "that
was w hat that confounded landlord was
trying to tell me."
They remained at Rome two months,
and Bradnor
with them. He met thei
ut London. The grace and charm of the
young woman were equal to the melody
of lier voice, and—well, when the next
he
»er
drriost continually
at Bnris, and
he
laid
I ivy
Easter rolled around Kitty Bradnorsat
j by the side of her husband in the little
covered church.
here,
he nft
er ward declared, she sang more divine!}'
than ever.
in
WILMA M ROBBER COB BE.
EASTER TRIUMPH.
A I'*r«*Mli Imp«*I
AspIrationM of Mnnkln«!.
<.l %
I h «» I I
It
The passing
K T r| *aJ for undisguised triumph in
! external nature. Sky i
if the sei
re season is
1 s
, and
be- ! ,m,a<1 {
j new fire.
! '
• 1
•e lighted up with a
It is the feast of the sun, the
»K.
'«ikening of the myriad sleep
ing beauties- the running of the sap,
I the coloring of the leaf and the flower,
t he return of life and strength and myr
•carlv »

.id aetivit iuH.
'h Easter is at one with that of
nature and with the Divine who is risen.
The ancient church ranks the resurrec
h the first, and primal basis of her
to I claim. For if He is not risen there is
i no shadow of right in Christianity as a
Divine institution. But, on the other
hand, all men are risen with Him. The
cry great and strong
in j that Easier morning when Love came
back from the tomb with a message of
hope and a proof and assurance of the
faith of the chosen few.
Ma
it
|
or Id rose
• since Easter triumphs have
multiplied, rising is the new order. Ex
celsior is the schoolboy's motto,
grown ambition sees nothing in the
way of his attaining the greatest honor
or the highest station—except lack of
favorable eimilli
ard in
a tuv
Ei
Full
opportunity and
stance*. The primeval dow
man unnics back
■ only as :
ism that, is out of place and out of date.
In the aspiring of an ill-judged pur
suit. of great m ss or success, the bad
trait of some long dead ancestor comes
back to pull down, instead of building
up. 'The general tendency, however, is
upward. We believe a fresh impetus
wus given to it on the first Easter when
the women waited for Him
back- the Light of Hope from the
if denth. There is
come
dcuth, but light and
more darkness
life.Collier's Weekly.
K
GUI».
hen En st er gift»
The time
ere
has long
niade to symbolize the sea
since passed away, says Harpe
Souvenirs are
v ith nl
zur.
most as
('lirlst
church folk claii
generous lavishness
i*- tide; indeed, some nrdent
that the Easter i*e
memhranee'has the deeper significance,
• i it takes many beautiful forms, but
the distinctive quality that separated it
from others no longer exists. Hooks of
prayer or devotion may be give
changed, but as the result of individual
at
r ex
preferences rather than because of
any general sentiment attaching to the
duy. Indeed, gift making has spread so
far beyond the church limits it is doubt
ful if'
•alizés the special
nu essential
*ry giver
fining that once held
element in the gift.
Orlulii of the Word.
Easter, the festival of the resurrec
tion, wus instituted in or about A. D.
observed earlier,
as it is alluded to by the first Christian
writers us well known in their time.
The word is of Saxon origin, being ap
plied in English to the festival from the
name of the Saxon goddess Eostre,
whose festival was held in the spring.
The word in Acts 12:4, translated
"Easter," means "passover," the Easter
festival being held nt the same time as
the Jewish Passover, and as many if
not most of the early Christians were of
Jewish origin it was an easy matter for
them to convert the greatest day of the
Jewish ecclesiastical year into the
greatest festival of Christianity.—Ex
change.
at
at
of
be
Tropical IllNcnnc*.
An Italia
has devoted
yeas of study to the diseases thatpre
\»iil in tropical countries and is of the
opinion that every one of them peculiar
to those regions is of parasite origin, or,
in other words, the result of bacterial
attacks, and that, with the progress of
sanitation and hygiene, there will soon
he no reason why white men cannot
safely and ns long in hot lands
as in those where the temperature is
varied by seasons of cold. An interest
physicir
''ig conclusion which he has reached is
^'nt sunstroke, like main rial fevers,
cholera and the plague, is produced not
•tion, but by living
germs; that is Jin infectious disease and
not an accident.—Chicago Tribune.
live
by the sun's
Ennter.
Across the winter's gloom
a golden ray,
ch wildflower's tomb
at
I*
ters
law,
ed
his
is
ble
There falls
An*i from ea
The stone D rolled away.
Once more to life and lovo
Tin, buds and leaves of spring
Come forth and hear above
The birds like angels sing.
In every
Hehold the symbol shown.
The mystery revealed,
The majesty made known!
Christ, who was crucified,
Ts risen! Lo, the sign!
The enrth at Klister-tide
Touched by His hand divine*
—Frank Dempster Sherman, in
Companion.
The Rude Analinlng.
The Easter bonnet is n dream of
beauty. It la a pity that the presenta
tion of the bill is the rude awakenimr
—Buffalo News.
! and field
Youth's
Hl* Kneter Offerlnv.
I dar« not offer her a hat,
on things mundane I may not feast her
And so I have dvclded that 1 n * r '
I'll o(f er her myself at Faster.
-Detroit Fra. Fr««a.
Sere Knoa*h.
Whnt woufd life be without the Easter
hat at this season?— Boston Globa.
SWEPT BY A TOßNADO.
Hy
the
an
Arlington, Where Recently Nine
School Children were Killed,
And Many Other Town* iu Georgia. Visited
by a Tornado, Which Destroys Every
thing In ft* I'ttth Reports of liant*
age and I<oim of Life Coming In.
a
a
re
Atlanta, Ga., April 10.—Telegrams
fron Ozark. Ala., and Valdosta (Ga.)
( ros>sing, the ill-fated tow n of Arling
ton. Ga., show that this section was
visit Ml yesterday by another gulf tor
nado. ascending the Apalatchieola val
ley t nd sweeping northward with ter
rific force to the confluence of the
Chatftahoochie and the Flint rivers,
wh^e it divided, one division going
tovvard Ozark where timber
up >ted
was
blown
and
houses
s. . i ; • several lives were lost
tn
au g tli en: Mrs. Powers, who was
ca v f »t beneath the falling timbers of
be.' ome and crushed. Her husband
wm tnai/h to save her. and was bim
se! badly hurt, but he rushed off
thi gb tin blinding rain and intense
assistance. The rest of
th* ifnily were rescued, among them
>y , tl • weeks old, whom the
■r pro*,, ted at the loss of lier own
lib {
ijecond suction of the tornado
'•■a jcfleeted upon the Flint valley,
ross south Georgia and
in
is
ir 'k r
ig through Arlington, where but
weeks ago nine children were
In the ruins of their school
j.ai
a f.
kill.
hou
a
Rd ehing Valdosta, the storm be
am! intensified in fury and trees were
down in every part of the. city,
reh in the southern part of the
city vas wrenched from its founda
tion and twisted into fragments by
the gry winds. Many box cars on
the iant system were blown off the
trau
boajj in the Western Union telegraph
offit and set fire to the building. From
mai' other towns in the vicinity re
por 1 of an equally alarming nature
are" tiling in.
bh.
A cl.
of
is
a
Lightning struck a switch
THE BATTLE ON,
:
Ftßl!
Between Greek flrlgAnds and
Turkish Troop».
shonA, Macedonia, April 9, Noon.
Is of Greek brigands have en
I'urkcy at Krania in the vicinity
vena. The Turkish troops have
ngaged with them and fighting
en proceeding since live o'clock
F
—B.
of c
becB
has 1
this iorning.
A„ the Turkish headquarters this
new s looked upon as being of the
gra Î t description in view of the ex
citerrftit here.
kki)em I
has sent orders to have
eventiling in readiness for
of thj Turkish army in force. It is
not kkown yet whether Greek troops
werekmong the bauds that have en
tereiiTurkish territory.
advanee
*ü Flghtlfif; Between Greek» and
Turks.
Uimtl i
Ki.^sona. April 9. 4 p. m.—A dis
pat.- '«received at. the Turkish heud
f|uatYf*s lien- from (4rovena says that
the tvlitinif between the Greeks and
Turk.v.'ontiuues. The Turks follow
ing on b< he instructions of E.lem I'asha
iiave Airrounded the Greek irregu
lars, ipfi a greater part of the Turkish
divisio s stationed at Grovena under
liakkit'ashn i;
It. impossible
of
in
/ advancing.
to distinguish
wheth-r the invaders are supported by
any su/stantial portion of the Greek
régula army, a
taken p a position i
forest. Hut the correspondent of the
Associ ted Press is informed that the
the Turkish officers ascer
he presence of the
>f the Greek regulars iu
the rtiks of the aggressors Ed
hem ltslia .will order the advance
of the otire Turkish army. The situ -
uatimi k most serious. In the mean
time Ei*m Pasha remains at the gen
eral headquarters awaiting news. He
has alr^dy notified his generals of di
visioif t> hold themselves in readiness
for ihspint action, and the reserves
havenljendy left the encampment here
in orIlei to move closer to the first line
of delete.
the Greeks have
the middle of a
motile!
tain
forms
mu
An
not
be
of
Grp tha is 18 hours' march from
here juin Krania is ten miles' march
soutmvfctward of Grovena.
SECRETARY GAGE PERPLEXED
By (ho t»ue*tlou What to Do with th«
\ Heathen Chlnea.
VVashnoton, April 10.—Secretary
Gage aid the immignation officials are
perplex«! as to the best course to pur
sue in regard to the immigration of a
large 'limber of Chinese laborers in
conn tin with the Chinese exhibit
at the lational exposition at Nash
ville. Tejn. The law allows the immi
gration jf
nese lalsrers to clqthe work of install
ing the tkbibit, and also such
desire to^ive entertainments i
hibitioiu on condition that a bond is
given thit they will leave the country
at the cljse of the exhibition. The ex
perieneebf the officials is that many
of the (Jiinese, finding business dull
after a wpek or two, drift over the
country aid engage in other business,
sometime entering the Chinese thea
ters at SjU Francisco. While this is a
violationiof the spirit of the law, there
does pot teem to be any way of pre
venting t. The matter, however, is
under consideration by the officials
and it is loped that some remedy may
be disco^red.
as
cier
he
of
sufficient number of Chi
may
the ex
the
and
ter
not
tl^eir
the
tions
than
STEEP FOUND.
The torr^pondent i* With the Insurgent*
In Cuts*.
Washijgton, April 10.-Thomas W.
Steep, he missing Scripps-MeKar
league orreapondeut In Cuba, haa
been foufl. Ha ia in the camp of the
patrlota. The length of time he hae
been thee Is not now known.
wm »received at the state
deparhqnt from Consul-General Lee
at I/aatiU. stating that he had at last
heardlrom Steep, alive and well, but
beyorJ reach of communication with
Ilavad._
r«opZ|bf I Jacksonville, IU., Not Kntlrely
a Ml With Draper'. Confmalon.
Jai : KINVII.I.K, III., April 10.-The
most I iki of man in the city is Charles
I* Dr jer, now in jail for murdering
Chart, Ip. Hastings. In some quar
ters tl rw is considerable talk of lynch
law, b ; Wise eotmc.il will preTail, and
meant îej the prisoner Is being guard
ed so ^ [to prevent any* such catas
troph,
his ci
is tak, in it, as it is regarded as the
work F his lawyers, who took that
means » nakc a case as good as possi
ble ffi heir client.
f
War
to
ier
ened.
A m
are
Giving
Bliss
ified
aat
to
eral
Capt.
chief
office.
per Is in better spirits since
fession. Not very much stock
DUN'S COMMERCIAL REVIEW.
Encouraging Deduction* from the Quar
ter** Failure#- The Sudden Coilapee In
Wheat- Receipt* and Export* of Wheat
and Corn Slight Advance In Cotton—
The Iron Industry Hampered—Lowest
Price* Ever Reached.
New York, April 10.— R. O. Dun &
Co., in their weekly review of trade to
day say:
Out of 4.000 failures, with liabilities
of 300,752.501 in the first quarter, 74
banking failures covered more than a
fifth of the amount, 912,744,650, and
3.545 failures with liabilities of 835,
047,892, or nearly three-fifths, are clas
sified this week according to branch of
business, leaving only 587 failures, and
less than a fifth of the liabilities, 812,
060,019, in branches of manufacture or
trade not specified. Only two of the
13 manufacturing classes and only
four of the 13 trading classes
show liabilities for the quarter
larger than last year, and only
five manufacturing and three trading
show larger average liabilities. For
the month of March only three manu
facturing and four trading classes
show larger amounts than last year
and only two manufacturing and five
trading show a larger^ average of lia
bilities. In almost every case also, it
is shown that the increase is due to
one or two exceptionally large failures
in that class.
The returns compared with those of
three previous years disclose much im
provement already, and a bright pros
pect for more hereafter.
A sudden collapse in the wheat mar
ket, exceeding three cents in a day, ap
pears to have no other cause than a
belated perception that past accepted
estimates of yield and consumption,
official and other, have been mislead
ing. Floods and other unfavorable
weather for seeding have no weight.
Expectation of great scarcity and
high prices burst like a bubble, and for
a time, the only support was the tak
ing of profits by speculators for
a fall. Receipts have not warranted
hopes of a great advantage, nor do
they now warrant much expectation
of decline. Western receipts
smaller than last year, ancl Atlantic
exports not large, though over 60 per
cent, larger than a year ago.
Corn receipts continue heavy, and
exports for the week were 3,823,837
bushels, against 1,142,710 last year,
and against Atlantic exports of wheat
amounting, flour included, to only 1,
521,122 bushels, against 967,553 last
was
tor
val
of
off
of
ly
C.;
the
his
the
fell
A
and
Ll»t
for.
and
how
the
mer.
day
about
mains
ments
dead
found
ruins.
found
belief
mer
E.
and
the
at
Of
die,
civil
baled
ville,
are
611,000;
secured
stopped
Rmult
amount
the
works.
block
bourse,
block
were
their
the
sued.
a re
year.
In spite of floods, which must have
materially affected the prospect, cot
ton has only advanced an eighth dur
ing the week. The fate of those who
were absolutely certain that the crop
of 1890 was very short, has left but lit
tle confidence for further speculation.
Receipts thus far still indicate
a sup
ply of American consideraby greater
than has ever been consumed in
year, but uncertainty about the
ing crop induces much buying.
The demand for cotton goods does
not increase, although sales of fair
magnitude continue, but print cloths
are dull.
eojn
The iron industry is hampered by the
contest between Mesaba ore interests,
which prevents, as yet, any settlement
of ore prices and leads many to
pect further decline i
ucts.
bake Erie works at Cleveland and
the works of Oliver & Co.
liyers .t, Co., at Pittsburgh,
stopped by labor difficulties aud
furnaces have stopped because the
product of the pig had outrun the de
mand for finished products and heavy
stocks remained unsold.
Pittsburgh, for pij? brings only 810, and
gray forge, only 8s. 75, the lowest
record, but no ipiotable decline is seen
in finished products and nails
strong.
sus
finished prod
The Illinois steel works, the
and
are
some
Bessemer, at
on
are
WARM WORDS OF PRAISE.
An Outgoing Treasury Official Heartily In
dorse» the Incomers.
Washington, April 10.-Mr. Charles S.
Hamlin, ex-assistant secretary of the
treasury, said to an Associated Press
representative:
"Before leaving Washington I
not refrain from expressing my appre
ciation of the courtesy and considera
tion extended to me by President Mc
Kinley and Secretary Gage.
"No one has been brought into closer
official relations with Mr. Gage than I
during the last five weeks, and I will
venture the prediction that his record
secretary of the treasury will
be a memorable
of affairs, an
can
as
A man
one.
earnest, consistent
civil service reformer, a trained finan
cier of the first rank, he brings quali
fications into his high office rarely
possessed by any one man. In the
management of the nation's finances
he should receive the cordial support
of all people regardless of party affilia
tions.
l may also add that the cause of
civil-service reform has received
a pow
erful impetus in the appointment by
the president of Mr. Cridler and Mr.
Howell as assistant secretaries of state
and the treasury respectively. Bet
tor the positions could
been been found, and
ter men
not have
tl^eir appointments
recognition of the merit system as will
prove an incentive to even* person in
the public service. My intimate rela
tions with Mr. Howell during the four
years past justify me in saying that
there is not a better equipped man
than he in the United States for the
position he fills so well.**
are such a
NO CESSATION.
War Preparation* Contlnne on the Part
of tireece.
Larissa, April 10.-In spite of ofllcial
intelligence received here Thursday
saying that the powers have arranged
to settle the Cretan qnestlon by a
plebiscite of the island, there is
cessation of war preparations Troops
being forwarded daily to the front
ier and the posts are being strength
ened. The transport arrangements
admirable. The troops are full of
thnsiasm and they are splendidly
equipped.
no
are
are
en
SECRETARY BLISS.
Ended
San
from
who
land
has
ing
and
French
port
her
which
IS
Giving th. Old Soldier. Another Inning.
Washington, April < 10.—Secretary
Bliss is carrying out the policy of the
administration in restoring to the class
ified government service old
war
veterans who are held to have been Im
properly removed from office by the
aat administration. Yesterday, he re
instated Capt. Henry C. Potter, of Ohio,
to hla old position as chief of the min
eral division of the land office and
Capt. George Redway, of California, as
chief of accounts division, general land
office.
;■
BRYAN BADLY HURT.
Man f Other* Received Injurie*, _ _
Them Serien*- A Collap»ed Ptaua wne
the Cause—An Inconsiderate Crowd it
St. Anjpustine, Fla., Who Wanted to Shake
Hand* with Mr. Bryan After Healing Him
Speak.
St. Auer «TINE, Fla., April 10.-Wm.
Jennings Bryan was injured here
Thursday night by the fall of a section
of a hotel piazza. The democratic can*
didate for president at the late elec
tion was rendered unconscious, his
face was badly cut and his body bruised
in several places, but his injuries are
not regarded as very serious. Others
in the wreck were not so fortunate.
Many were internally injured, some
having legs and arms broken, while
nearly everybody suffered more or
less. Those most seriously injured
were :
Quar
In
&
to
74
a
and
835,
clas
of
and
812,
or
the
only
For
year
five
lia
it
to
of
im
ap
a
for
for
do
per
1,
THE INJURED.
/*'
\
WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN.
Senator Frank P. Genovar, internal
ly injured.
Miss Delia Lamb, Williamstown, N.
C.; fractured leg.
Mrs. R. J. Oliver, leg broken.
Claude Mourer, leg broken.
Miss Lillian Herne Ankre, skull in
jured.
Mrs. J. F. Craddock, badly bruised.
Mrs. T. A. Pacetti, badly bruised.
Mrs. Katherine Foster, badly bruised.
Virginia Cole, badly bruised.
Judge A. J. Corbett and wife, legs
and arms broken.
Amos Corbett, bruised.
A. J. Watts, internally hurt.
Dr. Daney, nose and face badly cut.
Miss lolo Lopez, leg broken.
A. J. Beasley, leg broken.
Elvvood Salmon, leg sprained.
William Mourey, leg and
Clarence Bennett, badly hurt.
Mrs. Rose Crabtree, badly sprained.
Miss M. W.
sprained.
Miss Delora Foster, both legs broken.
Mrs. Charles Dial, broken foot
C. Lopez, fractured leg.
Mrs. Parker, internal injuries.
Mrs. W. G. Foster, nervous shock.
Four hundred persons fell with the
piazza,which was that of the Hotel Han
Maco. Mr. Bryan made a speech from
the piazza to 3,000 persons. He
aroused considerable enthusiasm and
when he concluded the crowd
made a rush to surround him and shake
his hand. Hundreds were packed into
the piazza, when, with a crackling,
crashing noise, a section 40 feet square
fell to the ground, a distance of 20 feet.
A general rescue movement was imme
diately instituted, and the injured men
and women eared for.
THE KNOXVILLE HORROR.
Ll»t of Thoso Known to Have Perished—
Fourteen Persons Yet Unaccounted For.
Knoxville,T enn., April 10.—Of the 52
guests who were sleeping in the Hotel
Knox Thursday morning when the fire
broke out only 85 have been accounted
for. The hotel register was destroyed,
and it will perhaps never be known
how many lives were lost.
Those known to have perished in
the flames are:
A. E. Weeks, the Lock (N. Y\), drum
mer.
G. W. Roberts, of Pulaski, Tenn.,
lightning-rod agent.
E. A. Williams, Springfield, Mass.,
retired merchant.
Telegrams have been pouring in all
day from different cities inquiring
about people supposed
Knoxville.
The work of searching for the
mains in the ruins was begun late yes
terday afternoon, and the develop
ments already indicate that the list of
dead will be much larger than at first
thought.
found in different localities of the
ruins. Where one of these bodies is
supposed to have been cremated were
found a number of pocket knives,
shears, razors, etc., which leads to the
belief that Weeks, the cutlery drum
mer for the Rochester house, had at
tempted to carry out his sample case.
E. Williams, of Springfield, who was
beyond a doubt lost, was 63 years old
and was travelling for his health.
Large rewards have been offered for
the bodies and a large force of men is
at work clearing away the debris.
Of the injured perhaps only one will
die, J. C. M. Bogle, of Tennessee, a
civil engineer, lies in a very critical
condition at the city hospital. He in
baled flames and his limbs are burned.
Messrs. Keppart, McMillan, Hogan,
Hudson, Keck and Hicks, all of Knox
ville, who are the most painfully hurt
are recovering.
Total loss sustained will foot up 81,
611,000; total insurance. 8614,209.70.
Many of the firms burned out have
secured temporary quarters and the
wholesale houses especially have
stopped filling orders.
TEN LIVES LOST.
Rmult of a Firework* Explosion and Fin
at Bueno* Ajrro*.
Buenos Ayres, April 10.-An immense
amount of damage has been caused by
the explosion of a car loaded with fire
works. The accident occurred
block of buildings adjacent to the
bourse, and the buildings almost
immediately caught fire. A whole
block was destroyed before the flames
were under control. Ten persons lost
their lives from the explosion or during
the conflagration that immediately
sued.
re
lit
oroken.
Goode, bruised and
to have been in
re
Charred remains were
never
near a
en
SEVEN YEARS 1IEBELLION
Ended by th. I'.ptur. of (Jo mu Manul
»nd Man y of Her Subject*.
San Francisco, April 10.— Advice»
from Tahiti state that Queen Mamai,
who for seven yean aa ruler of the in
land of Raitae, haa defied the French,
has surrendered, and the long stand
ing rebellion on the islands of Raitae
and Hauheine haa been put down. The
French gunboat Aube and the trans
port Caroline captured the queen and
her dhlef men after a hot fight, ia
which 35 natives where killed, while
IS were drowned.

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