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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, August 19, 1897, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89065008/1897-08-19/ed-1/seq-3/

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i. Z. GEORGE IS DEAD.
The State of Mississippi Loses
Her Seuior Senator.
•n( Commoner lVneefoUy
..' i,r "" r
<!—A t*rert lawyer, a (.allant
Soldier, » Profound Statesman.
The r;i
Jackson, Aug. 14.—A telegram re
ceived lato this afternoon from Missis
sippi City, tho gulf coast, summer resort.
announces the death of I nited States
Senator James Z. George, at 2 o clock
p.m.
This morning Hon. A. A. Kincannon,
State superintendent of education,
whose wife is a granddaughter of the
senator, received a telegram to the
effect that he was sinking rapidly, and
when it became know n a shadow of
gloom was cast ovor the community.
Lator in the day Senator Walthall
rived cm tho north-bound train.

He
was direct from Mississippi City, where
he had been with Senator George tho
past two or threo days, and though ho
declined to bo interviewed on the sub
ject of the condition of the health of
his illustrious associate, he did not offer
any cheering suggestions.
Fink George, of Carrollton, son of the
sick statesman,
south-bound train this afternoon. He
was hastening to his fathor's bedside,
being call». I by a telegram from his
brother, whi-ih read: "Father is sink
ing rapidly."
ator George journeyed from his
home at Carrollton to the gulf coast
about ten da vs ago, and hoped the
change would bo beneficial to him and
it was thought H had, until tho news
came today of the relapse.
the
ger
Se
III Neve,oil Month».
icorge's illness extended
•several months and precluded his
i a tor
-
presence upon the extra sess
gross, but during which !)«• was paired
with Senator Wolcott.
of e.
hick at Washington, ho was in tho in
•eeks before the peoplo
of Mississippi knew of his ill
when, later
ftnnarv sovi
one!s
I, ho ca
home at Carrollton, Miss., it
down to bis
nounccd that he was dangerously ill.
lie grew bot ter, it was. .■
he
began to take horseback rides hus fn
hoped for t ho best.
di stronger
vas ho in May that he and his wife col
lated tho fiftieth a
•ersary of their
wedding day, the occasion being rnadu
of general rejoicing. A month later
Airs. George breathed her last, and since
that time tho health of tho senator has
steadily declined. Two weeks sinco he
journeyed from bis home to Mississippi
City, his family thinking a change of
scene and tho salt breezes from the guif
would bo beneficial.
News camo every day that he was
slowly and steadily improving, and only
yesterday it was announced that his
physician, I)r. Henderson, who is also
his son-in-law, said he would bn able to
take his seat in the senate this winter,
and that the senator was himself confi
dent tho prediction was safe. This
morning bis granddaughter here re
ceived a telegram that he was dying,
and later came another that he bad died
at 2:40. His disease was fatty degener
ation of the heart.
iiorii in Gi-ur-j*!».
Senator George was born in Georgia,
October 20, 1*20, and was therefore in
his seventy-first year. When a lad his
father moved to Carroll county, where
he died shortly after, and his mother
married again. The only education ho
received was in the public schools, and
when a mere boy ho began tho study of
law against tho wishes of his stepfather,
who wanted him in the field.
Hut tho young man was ambitious; bo
defied the old man, quit the farm and
went to school and to reading law. Be
fore be was 20 years of age he went be
fore the legislature of tho .State, Feb
ruary 20, lfS4G, and asked that, bis disa
bilities bo removed, which was done,
and bo was made 21, as can be seen by
the acts of 184d, page 42*1.
In May, 1847, he was
Betti« Young, a society belle of that day |
and time, and the fruit of the union
arried to Miss
•as
Tho first political office to which he
» that ot district attorney |
negro and white vampires who occupied |
her State »nd county offices, and who
vlioru aroHtiil
eight children, six of
living, three sons and throe (laughtors.
III» Find OtHcc.
was elected
way hack in tho early all's, hut prior to
that time he had enlisted in the Mexi
, and came homo wearing an ofi
stripes, being made colonel for
can w ar,
fleer's :
bravery
again shouldered hi»
marched to the. defense of his State
the battlefield. In 'ül he
musket and i
, a
*
!
soldier of the Confederacy,
turned as a general after four years of
faithful service. Moving to Jackaoa so
as to better attend to bis increasing
practice before the Supremo Court, Gon.
George soon took rank as one of the
foremost lawyers in the State.
In Stormy Day*.
In 1875, tho year Mississippi deter
mined to throw off the yoke of oppres
sion and to rid herself of the hordes of
«1 re
were sucking tho very life-blood from
the pouple by oppressive taxation, Gen.
George was made chairman of the
Democratic State executive committee,
and under his wise leadership Ames and
his black cohorts were hurled from
place and power, and decency and in
telligence once more held sway,
next stepping stone was to the .Supreme
Court bench, where he remained till
March 4. 1881. when be was elected to
the senate. He was re-elected in 1587
and again for the term ending March,
1890, during all of which time be has
remained in close touch with his peo
ple by a faithful performance of duty
and sympathetic care for tht*ir best in
tereits*. As a member of the constitu
tional convention of 1890 he shaped and
directed the most important measures,
and to his foresight and magnificent
brain his peoplo now credit their de
livery from the then ever present negro
problem.
To him is the State Indebted for the
understanding clause and $2 poll tax
requirement for voters and its accom
panying blessings. To him is she in
debted for the death of the subtreasurjr
bugaboo, and the burial of the force bill
proposed in congress. That be deserves
the title <( 01d Commoner, M fly which he
is everywhere known, no one wbo knew
bi« doubts, and the Bute will never
train see bis like.
Tho
~ .. . ,
Th« Matter of mceeelon 1« o»* tb»t
Ml
-by
; will now occupy the attention of this
people till settled by the governor, and
i speculation is oven now rife.
Several gentlemen have been men
tioned as possible successors, anon;
them ex-Gov. Lowry, Congressman .Ino.
\ M. Allen and \V. V. Sullivan, Judge S.
U. Terrell of tho Supreme Court bench,
c. .. Miller of Meridian, Senator-Elect |
, . .. , . . i
| Money and other». However, thil is
all speculation.
Jackson, Aug. 15. -Tho remains of
Xo on« knows.
the late Senator .lames Z. George, who
! died at Mississippi City yesterday,
reached this city today at - p.tn., and
were met at the depot by an immense
j crowd of citizens,
A ii
, of march was formed and tho
. remains conveyed to tho rotunda of tho
j capitol, where they will lie i
der a military guard until
; p i ace d on the flowery btor in tho capi
^ tol the lid of tho coffin w as removed and
| a ceaseless throng of people passed in
state t
tomorrow.
Immediately after the remains were
arrollton for :
line to view for tho last time the face
; of the great statesman.
Tomorrow tho remains of tho late
j
' senator will bo taken to
burial by tho side of his wife, who only
; preceded him to tho unknown a few
weeks ago.
i
I
CLOUDS WERE DISPELLED.
Hup p.v In ft tie lie,- uf
Gentle
Squnre Meal.
est
■ Ml
''If there is anything 1 despise ana
detest," said Mrs. Hilltops, ''it's
-•holy."
Mrs. Hilltops is not often so vigorous
this, and when she is Mr.
in speech
Hilltops knows tin
up. As j
it is time to brace
isual
...itter of fact lie takes
v;but wit
he is di
occasionally, he is
I silent and solemn enough,
takes every
and lie
around I:
1 lie children, sitting at the
, retcheu.
aide, stop
g, the dinner gets j
ilk
1 fra!
•verybody is chilly and mis
■haps, at the last, Mr.
who liiids, tin ally, a
! Hilltops himself,
.•holy pleas
ion that lie has caused.
Hut Mrs. Hilltops has no use fur j
. «he has tu
ud;
•e in. the gen
irai depre
body that easts
iais, but she
\er bothei s a
•in; outwardly, at
spirited ai
i't abide anybody t hat
lets his troubles ko far overcome hi
1 1 1'« 1 1 lit* inflicts them
j Loo, and so she says:
"If there is ans thing 1 despise it's
e about
least,
.e is cheerful and
u other people,
•holy."
At that Mr. Hilltop takes a
lie looks up and smiles, it is wonderful
with what alacrity the children re
spond, and Mr. Hilltops responds to
that, and gloom is dispelled once more
by the ever grateful light of cheerful
ness. And when Mr. Hilltops, as the
phrase goes, gets something to eat, lie
feels himself better still. He remem
bers what he has often said to himself,
that no feeling of depression should
ever be accepted as genuine until it aus
been subjected to the test of a good
square meal, and he linds that the pres
ent one will not stand that test. In
fact, under the combined influences of
Mrs. Hilltops' energetic protest and the
good dinner it is rapidly disappear
ing, and as the dinner progresses Mr.
Hilltops takes a still broader and more
cheerful view of things, and by the time
l.lte meal is iinished he is beaming with
good nature, perfectly satisfied with
the present, and absolutely confident
of the future.--AI. Ï. Huu.
| tie
PATIENT OLD AGE.
J( At««?» I-'Ind« rripiMl» mid S>
this««
Truly there are trials belonging to old
age which are hard to bear. The loss of
faculties is the hardest, writes Mrs.
Lynn Linton,
ploy oneself, not asking help from any
ad. write,
ill in the
•cupation, old uge has
st inflictions.
So long ns
ne can ci
person—so long as
•k. knit- w hat s
•ay
of independent
lost one of its •
When blindness anti deafness and n
ability to use the hands, and such btrtl
akes movement im
jmssiblt—when all these have over
taken the old, then the dregs are indeed
hitter. And then there is nothing for
lit but the grand, brave dignity of pa
ie— the noble resignation
ceptn the inevitable and makes the best
of had conditions.
Patient old age always finds friends
land sympathizers, where the peevish
i^nd the grumbler. like camphor atoms,
| re P el a)1 " i!h wllum ,lie .V conie >' ü "
When old age is selfish and re
pining—thinking only of its past joys
or its present pains, the young, to whom
a natural virtue, and (he
aturai
sympathetic, a teMsfa «nd (rra.piniN.ge.
fhev would (five love If thev hnd lose
to (five them: but when they know that
, . f .1 . ...
the glor, o letr o tig > ■ ' ! * 1
a text for unkindly comments and un
| sv ,„pathetic feeling, then they with
d ' rBW- al ,d shrink, and fail to show those
. ..
sweet attentions which the young love
show the old-.f .0 he those dregs are
allowed patiently and are not flung
so much poison into the fresh faces
whose lips are red with the wine ns yet
sparkling, foaming and unexhausted.
—Chicago Journal.
ilv
ak ness as
li ich ac
lî î < t .'
'1
shrinking from annoyance is
instinct, these young shrink from the
, soured old creature, whose talk is
i
| " 0, '
a threnody and whose daily file is an
unwilling martyrdom.
! They cannot console, and they feel
the jealousy which denies them sympa
thy and gives them instead an angry
kind of reprobation. They suffer in the
cold nnd shadow of a loveless and tin
I
as
Willi A«l%
Some of the newest skirts have
trimmed sides and a narrow, plain
front; others show the back as well, or
namented.
So matter what anyone may say to
the contrary, odd waists of taffeta are
still numbered in the
women of fashion, and will be tliis fall.
You can hardly put too much lace on
your midsummer gowns, whether they
be of silk, cotton or the very lushion
nbie thin woolen goods of o semi-trans
parent nature, like the revived bareges
and veilings worn.
There is every prospect of tucks re
maining in fashion for the fall, and the
revived cashmere gown will be orna
mented in this manner. The round,
tucked corsage is too becoming to slen
der figures to allow it lodrop, and the
dry goods merchant will rejoice at the
fashion that sells more material.-—Chi
cago Record.
r tnt; Siiiiiuht.

by
a
x
nrdrobes of
The Latest !■ bashes.
Trimmed sasbee ere in order, accord
ing to Oemorest's. and some of the taf
feta. about aix inches wide, reitahce
nearly to the foot of the ikirt and bave
, dainty frill ell around of narrow mi- i
^ Dn L.-0)lcn** Tribune. <
■fr
IN CYCLEDOM.
CHAINLE3S WHEELS.
ScU Sen so ii They Will He
Sale In
l.nrue Number».
It is not unlikely that the cbninless !
bie.vele will bo manufactured by them»
| l™«»' " f the laig-Crmj, next year. There j
i has oeeu talk of sueh it possibility for i
tlie last t , VO y,eai-». but caVt» cycle fchow
has seen but a few models, with the in
formation that the machinery needed
to make them for the market would
i
sale for some
prevent their being
time.
From information that has been
. !
stated
gleaned from \u noms sources., however,
it appears very probable that the \v;
ISPS will see the
cycle salesroom,
that
bought all the patents possible (about
70 in relation to eha in less wheels)
and
sale at
It has bee i
: of the largest makers has
manufacture them as
his leader for the year with a chained
wheel at a reduced price. If the report
is true, it is certain that all the other
makers will prepare some kind of u
: chuinlcss wheel for the
Of course, as has been usual in past
aker is careful about
put king statements as to his succeed
ing yc..nd product, and none of them
• announcement for 18'JS. I
r of chain less i
years, euch
I .
luive made :
The number o
ho have met
disposing of their pate
lead ltumv to beli
vitli success
how i '
! !
that
ill sec the mueh-talked-of chaini
heel on sale.
The first chainless
e\t
;
heel made its j
•ry about live !
np pea ram
is ('..Hier . ;
ith RU>
rtietion and did not
the bevel-gear
iade
id, aithough improve
style
en Is wci
:
it each succeeding' year, there
nun!«
npiH'.'u'fd s
• diiheiilty ab
nt ma kiiu
j .
cad narr.
•I with a
to suit the riding publie.
Since that time invei
voted their t
with
models
de- :
i g it, but :
e to perfectir
;. A m
iber of
m a! thee
February, but
•ould not be termed perfect; either be
i i id ion in t he
w hich !
•idth of the trend,
anism c
failed b
rider.
ey of the avi
v nest \ear it is expected that j
ill !>«■ i « i hi eg out of the ordinary j
u:less bicycle
to see
N. Y.Jo
ic eon ii try.
i
CHANGEABLE GEAR.
lîicycle V |i|i I in
Ilienko
I ni)>ortit i
>]«
*-0 l»y
I
: I
( | I
Mowaezorki, of the Polish ( v
Iub, has ;
T(
■Ily in the
wheel.
si v of;
cling
Ikicli side
changeable geared
of the hub is fitted
ith a sprocket i
of cogs and
of different gear. A sysh
?ct tlirough the sent
here, by attaching a key, the j
one side to the
it bout dismount- j
a steel bar e
post,
be shifted fi
gear ci
otJier by the rider
ing. The chief value of the
its adaptability to different kinds of :
• in case of accident to one ■
side of the wheel. In olitnbinR hills it i
is tu. easy matter to shift from the
higher to « lie lower gear and thus i
make the work easier. One of the
wheels fitted with tile new gear was
heel is in ;
traveling
I
j
;
I
j
j
und
s '
:i j
A
11
k
y
•t;
W
!
CHANGEABLE OLAiiEH WHEEL.
ridden in tin* Chicago road rac
near Niles i
fall
was broken. The rider took the broke
* of the ckai
parted
the wheel by setting up a negro bicycle
groom. He looks very striking in n !
resplendent blue livery picked otit with
white. Well set up, rifling straight as
n dart, with the ostentatious vanity of j
hie race, (his negro has for some days j
: of the attractions of Mayfair, j
lie steers through Bond street leading i
the nickel-plated bicycle with blue
trimmings und saddle to match ne
lontriofT to hi* mistress. Arriving»! Ills
lady's house, he helps her .o mount,
ami follows at regulation <ll«tan<* the
silvered st. while its smart owner !
takes her morninff spin in the park.
I'neunmtlc Huh the i.utent. !
The wonderful success of the pneu
!
n, " ,,c , ,ire „ 1U1H , led to its appheatna1 to ,
'' r '? ut ll,,,,or d n 1,ar '" of tllc
bicycle, notablv the saddle. Now comes
new
hub ^ huh h „„ ,, rub()Cr #|r chnm .
chain off in n moment, threw it away, j
and, shifting the gear, rode the rest of j
the course. The extra cogs and steel ;
rod in the tubing make the wheel some- !
what heavier than ordinary bicycles,
but the inventor of the new scheme j
hopes to make the apparatus light ;
enough to do aw:
weight. A patent has been applied for.
—Chicago Tribune.
!
ith the extra
J
i
:,art ness to
,
Kexro Ilicyclc (iriioni.
An ingenious London woman has iin
ew element of
I
the pneumatic
ber between the wheel and the frame,
provided with a valve nnd st<?m. This
receptacle will resist n pressure of COO
pounds to the square inch, nnd while
not adding to the weight of the wheel,
renders its movements smoother, giv* !
ing a freer movement to the pedals, and
thus insuring greater speed with less
exertion.
I
mode Thief. |
A young kleptomaniac at Ogden*-j
burg, N. Y., Stoic a bicycle and con-.
ecnled it in a luraucr yard. He then |
started out nnd Mole a lantern and
tool bag. Thebe he attached to the
mftchine, and proceeded to stiil further
complete his outfit bv taking a shirt
and pair of socks from a neighboring
clothesline. It is not known just what
the object of his next trip was, but it
1« thought he wax looking fora league
ticket. However, he was gathered in
by au unappreciative policeman. I
__ - - j
Se« . « for
A »ovel u« was made of a bicycle by !
the manager of a small electric line iu 1
a western town. Laug unxwu, to as
certain the length of a particular :j
■tretch of road without going to the i
expense of haring it surveyed, be bad
x bicycle equipped with a cyclometer 1
ridden over the route and found tbe '
dietXBce within the required Jimita of j

!
sxnctntstk
NEW RACING BICYCLE.
It !• Too 0,1.1 In C otiMtrnetlon
coiue r«»i»ular.
On a new racing bicycle the wheel'
are farther apart, in order to admit of
II,*
! l ,ro ! H>r ' ns r ' ^
', l •*'* J. 1 '""' '
j h * ,
i 1 F *
>a mid that this U
f the handle
:
Vi > height.
)*• eha ; .
tit r that
be attained. It
intj.oM
there
in a
up
.gilt pc
s i-i urn g
ion. a
brace against, arid the .
i ert his full strengt h
the dow
nrd
stroke. The position take
n the i
iiuti)
heel
as tl e
'feat advantage
over the iToot pewr of the rider
ordinary
! cl os full piny, and tin \ can be cm
theboily offers no wind resistance. This
fu el, as it -in s the
J*
/
I
i *
\
bjf)
111
\\
//
'A?
lacing mcvfi.r:.
snme strength is
t rowing
t, anti, besides the )«>>i
Tin
! position of ly:
mnv scorn
the >
hai'd ot.e to
; >oou f
j j'' K
! lu '
nd a
s. Tlit* !ea;l:ei ;
lies keep'- him in a ] < t ; « udl/u
as regards the pedals, and
ht lew do
if the front fork iriu
handlebars being br
jiml
hieb the
o. The bi<
m-ver g
: t birg of t lie pas; If 1 1 i- f«
AMERICAN WHEELS BEST.
Mi? k, ; »
Save Tlii'lv v
mutier I
I» e l.
: *'
:
nsul
Charles De Kn.) , Id.
al States <
a 1 at l'erlin, in ;
« port to the
the
date depart ment, eu
Ils nttciit
•mod at the vei
ig eompetitiem
if Amei
! k' n
The League of Industrials at H
j
important
j •
• rial to the (ici
calls
this great
:• the f,
t ha
i nt ti
list r
ing to
the rivalry of Amcrie
I
They complain that the I'nited States
I lev ies n duty
about $H.2f
I being only :
71 to 05 cents duty falls
heels. On these and other
.mis the aid of the Ger
uent i.s asked i
i'*reh:i;
ad
vhile the Gci
duty,
ly
100 kilogr;
.71
fr*
the
America
j
j dustry.
govern*
behalf of the home in
: S5, .V S
■ "'1***1® °1 foreign make that they
i sc *> K '> rapidly in lierniniiy. lint lia
«""*« *1"')' are the strongest, lightest,
i soundest and most elegant in tliape.
i They have i t uitc taken the fiel.l, lie says,
from iteigiau, Austrian and British
The consul general in
his
report
it is not because the American
;
I wheels.
Jle expresses (lie opinion that large
■cssions could be made with safety
to the Ger
duties on German-made
•man public is now
of the superiority of the Americt
w heels that we will continue to liold the
arket so long as t li is high standard is
j maintained.
; Consul Monaghan at Chemnitz, Sax
ony, in a report to the state department,
I also calls attention to the effort that
German bicycle
akers in that province to m
j higher duties on American wheels,
j this end tli«' bund of German industries
have petitioned the foreign office on the
' subject, asking for immediate relict
j from the threatened danger.
ans in the
ray of lower
•heels, as the
•il convinced
G<
! is being
made
■cure
'J'o
land liquid. In this respect he differs
! from some other authorities. J hut
which may ci
trained man of powerful physique
j might be injurious to many who are itn
j properly trained.
j
i
kee P tl,um fnjm
011 » M ' ut ' 1,ul Kn ' L ' < -''' hu,,,e "•
then ' hu ™ P"»'«"" " kc 11 I m ' ce 01
! honeycomb eon vas .bout an inch wide.
i'urtly raised and partly sunk
jr.»l>t»er. Other, have des,?,,«
! pattern», but all serve the same pur
pose and save the riders many a hard
! 1 , , , . ,, J
, and muddy full.
j
j
;
!
j
; miles) i
Medical \*|»cel
of C) clin».
lisunpiouniere, of Dari«,
have devoted a good deal of
Dr. Lucas
is said
attention to the
ledicnl a spec
Jn liis opinion 000 kilometers I
a
ot
Ti for
not too
ll-traimd rider.
healthy,
! lieves that
cry little solid food I
J during exercise, but it is important to
i drink to replace the liijuid lost by per-1
tpirntiou. T.-«, bref tea and milk are]
useful. He ;>« lieves in raring
food »houKl
nitrogen
, l-e eaten; in fact.
irait
.) harm to r
ell
lllcycl« Tire».
ew est bicycle tires have grooved
a ri
The
circumferences
various patterns to
the
raised
U n ii iff!
(.'lient (lomi morning.
( lia ii kc III» Mind.
I\t juM received your bill for getting
me off in that assault and battery case
the other day.
Mr. Swellplead— Ah.
Any further in forms U
c bo U t it ?
yes. to be sure.
X can gi'
e you
Client--Yes; I'd like to know if I can
change my mind and go to gnol in
stead. Tit-Hit«*.
Tli«-lr A«l vim (nu •*«.
"Bachelors '.'•■t over insomnia more
ra , )illlv th; ,n married men."
"\viiy is timt '."*
"A married man's wife is always wak
ln „ , lini tr , ., sk hjm if
„et .-'-Chicago It,-cord,
' -
,<MM '• ♦ t.
A »iron«: Argument.
yj r> CuJdeash—Do you think you
c0 „id support my daughter in the M vie
to w | llel ; Mie hlm bee *
Cho „ v n^wgaul-N,,. sir; h„t. tl.cn.
itariety u t)ie sptceoflife, yon kaow
:j u( ]gJ,
* ' __
Among the présenta recently given a
Boston bride wae ■ bicycle.
must he something fia de xiecle even ia
wedding*. .
got to
First Farmer- 1 just went to town
to get some green good*.
Second Farmer -Green goods?
First Farmer—Yes,
a lined
ege
tabb s for the summer boarders.— N. Y.
World.
Hlereles for Brides.
There
SHE WANTED SNAKES.
Kind Mint \n* "rrn
The Iteitulntli
I >,*t I ci ii a
keen kii.'K
slit* asked, as
' Do you ., .
field kind
1 Hiii y
and 1
put at
I wn
mid if he kei ps «
ill UlhiUi
"N.i. in
«•111.Ill'
i m. I
till an <>
took 'do
the a
' It's a test «
.■at .'lit, -aml I tee! ■-«.•it . !
Me
the
s tin
out
lltlsl
In tiiuisih-*
k
hi- boots tint he'll yo «.
a Idled owl. but
e*ll I»««
lnink .i
hi
orktl
II."
c it
Stlil k « > II
Lotting It 11 Ik lit.
, P .„ ,, f
lions the lull
l.'ukid up at
''Do
! land Lead,
\ Miilnr«!
-Ami you
"111 Hon 1.
'•Hut. •
•lv, :p
•U ought to
citt like Hi.Mi.i
\ Ml
lia
«I <«! ih«- Ii.
• i. II %..n
it is ..... ...
of the e>:p
station."
led 1.«
id;.
that
.1
nt
There n
dl now « in i Öd v
ho
budget.
VII mi ii tli- r* I «mil.
"Well, I played golf with
an at t lie « lui*.
■ wife this
morning." >aid t lie
at the !it
"W l.i. li wun'r" said the
tie table.
The tirst
mouth around a bit, started
thtii«, but rcfi<
looked up. twisted hi*
• looked up.
?" he re,a-;
1.
" Which w
"\\ hit h
"What do v
I the otlu
Htigr ilv.
i a Moi
think I
?" Bulliilo l'hu|lliler.
non*1 turned too quickly
you fur roastuig other».
into trouble.
when folks brag
They may Ih> trying to get
W:odiingl
THE GENERAL MARKETS.
,ui/. id
K A M
Il v. Ma,
cattu:
Hesl l»-.-vi->
•HJ
Stock i
Nativ.
I-IOHS C
si! i i ;i*.
WH K AT
. 3 35
hea
:î ho
1 fVJ
('«•UN Nu 2 rnlxeil.
OATS Ni
Ift Cl
N<
FIA
rel_
(>(. 4 10
U 3 î<
JIAY
île** I limit hy .
11 ■ y nriilrie.
r
UK AN
HfTTEK (

41
13» „ «,
Full <-v ,
'liotoo _
POTATOES.
4(J
ST. LOUIS.
CATTLE Native «ml »hipping 3 75
<7(i 4
(<(, :i 91)
I hobs ii<
SHEEP I*
4
'•{> 3
Fl.i
•ho
. 3
WHEAT
WOHN
I OATS No. emix»-*!. .. .
'
"aiiii—Vv.' a','
pokk.
No.
P*
( 0 .
17

4,'. ((
11
CHHABO.
CATTLE r
HOGS I *aclt i
SHEEP
FLOPIi Winter w
WHEAT
(OKS N.
i ;r» (,/. », 30
• a •«, prim»
i -hipiiitt:/
2 red.
OATS No.
irt
44 , a
KVE
HfTTEK
LAKI ».
la
11
ery.
bokk.
4 32'j
I 35
7 PJ <j£ 7 tfft
NEW YOIUC
rATTI.K N'.itH'
H(X»N Hood
WHEAT No. 2
( OH N
OATS Nf). 2
I I
oh ole*-. 4 I 'it, 4 .V)
91 di. 92
32 %
22
H kb 15vi
25 kù S AO
ul .
Iff*'!TEH < >«•
cry...
POKE .%!»■»■•;
GROVES
, 2 A *fy ,
/c *Weiî
/
fat
IS
TASTELE5S
CHILL
TUNIC
I« JUST AS GOOD FOR ADULTS.
WARRANTED. PRICE 50 ots.
. . „ OsijATlA Ills. , Jtcv. K. UU.
Paris MtaMne Co., St. Louis. Wo.
Isst ymr, m bouts, ot
CHILL TONIC sod bare
bowfhtUirstxro.salisoerthl.rMr. In all our ri
psrtenct of It resit. In th# Crus htailnaat. ban.
MveraoM in afUels thatcsva *t cs salrtrssl tstle
aeUon tt row Tontt. loom -sir.
Assit, Csjut eco
GenUenent—We sold
OROVCH TeeTKLMH
\ l*nrtm*r
mm. 'Mo
death!
der c,
" said the
"I
it 1,
-Well. ,1
\ .
th
«I
• \
•lîn'l fee! Vi«
- :
MU' tH
r-»J
k.-l I I
\
if it
j peaceful «im I
1 l«M ' id I l •.
II. »V
rïlt era!
l.lbl'S M
on tl :
le .
ot tin- Ha!
•«I. and On
as No I. til,
. rill V « olllplo
• the '
i St.
■w luo*
I"*
N
Loins tlx.-i
\
Oik A
. .It Mr«
tin
«
, II V .
lit has n|no I
nnpi
in, itt <»! the
ï G M I
Il V. . t I «M, th,
In...
lived.
Tiii
l»a
«kn
wed.
I lu
111
!
t.
•rated than
I IKUltCMl.
(oil (til rj
lilt
I
\\ I.
lichtet
hvt
I '.111. Hl.alll
' I
Kli
Fill.
i
. aii.I I ,1 like I * • * i
tu
i." In
! «H Ktnpped m
I'»'i
N ' I
Di h
«I
Free!*
treatise. Dr. Khu -, 1W! Arch
Nerve I
. l'l.ila., Ha.
i- «
r Her.
: 1 M Mijrry » mill upi
She IniiiiliK till voi
CIm
Smile'
hear hei
"Did «
•tue how Mini
nil I he juiod t Iiiii^k tlicl e .
HI " i lli! ! '* I
ok
grid
e g ' 1 1 HKt ■'
oiitiniiHt.
tlie heut,
the best"
II"
nil .• h. « ,
II. l,.'li. w- that .
i •. i lu nu i 1 - f"
a II \ In think« hr
Hostoi
11.
eaiipl.
n
Ul île i ful < "Ugh
di
. Mr». W H
Blake Ave»., Mr
•vt. Vi
•dvn, N \ , Del. 2ti, 1)4
and
\
ill yet up
lier to i/o fitthin,/
WasliiliKt
th.
any other pm |
Di
ät.
lin 11 ' m tftinrrli (
Ik taken mteVnally.
There ;
t hink t hat if n girl
in »ing.
studied .n Fun.pc she e,
All the taii'ii!
!'*n b ivn j v n real
.
1
kuigldli De
ïtÈt*** 0 *
m
'fat
j- , J-j.jy jl jll
your oy a Itafhl Chrd
ä»o Che thill scab yod oürldé* pa^e
MldifraTeh logùt fWe »
Xjîçcl;c5lfrïîepwfflw fir w Ce*
1 leoWiNCHiisrifT^v» «
— -WnwHwEN CoHN. -
ftftatâs'-f'.«»»-'«-.
xIJHARTSMNSSb»
NOTICE
LABEL
4 »Ti I. ».-I
THE GENUINE
TI
pe Bliss School of Electricity
I WAWlIIJVfJrTOAr, Ü. c.
fi Th«- a-ly Itidltutc.n «t nplilinf t.. , !.. .. *•< (11< .1
.• y !.i.l.'.r«f< , v ft,
- 1 ' " 11 ' IMHTKUOTIO'W TME IlFbï - «
llcl»iirr I. f v ' vit!
?
Robert LLeeSS
ri"ul\ .irlvuijc life .n>l«in< i
.-.. ''ml iiitvfMM»f « »f.-re- >• untfj
I. IT fil.lHimKi Cf,., I It L A Mnln hi , icml, '
Kt
(SICK HEADACHE! "M.
j Poisonou:; matter, instead of being: thrown out, is reabsotbed into
i the blood. When this poison reaches the delicate brain tissue, it
, causes congestion and that awful, dull, throbbing, sickening pain.
i
s
»
"VE THEC 4 USEBYI
' STIMULATING THE UVER,
the blood.
Making the poison move on and out, and purifying
The effect is ALMOST INSTANTANEOUS.
j LADIES
whose sensitive orginiim is especially prone to sick headaches, DO
NOT SUFFER, lor you can, by the use of CASCARETS, be »
' Relieved Like Magic, *
!
««
FOOL'S HASTE 18 NAE SPEED."
DON'T HURRY THE WORK
UNLESS YOU USE
SAPOLIO
?
-■
3
CCCC'CW
ri»
Ladies
«KE THAT
THIS NAME
ii
Jl
IS tTAMPRf) OJC
Every Pair
OF SHOES YOU BUY.
*T is a pwsirm: ova n a kite
OF MITKKIURITY.
Atk Your Dealer lor Them.
eerriwu vt
THE MOONEY SCHOOL,
rrssnklln. Toxul '
W.0.MI
'Et It,
It* Pupil* snt«r Vanderbilt University Without
mi
SOWETHJNC NEW.
fîaniîii
It]
[/' I'.KI'IN< ! abreast with
^ tho inventions of this
ape, we, by modern ma
chinery,
compress
our
powilcrKl Dr. M. A. Sim
mon*-' Livci Medicine into
tablets ami'* sugar coat
them.
Consumers can either
swallow the tablets whole
oi chew them up anil swal
low with water,
candy sugar coating ex
cludes the air, protects the
purified medicine from
mierobie influences, pre
vents the possibility of
deterioiation from atmos
The
pIii 'rie cli;i 1 1
s, insuring
perfect purity anil full
strength when taken, anil
makes it pleasant to
take as cnmlv; Tablei
pont ;iin only flu* powdered
1 dvor Moilifinc, same as
sold in packages by Dr.
M. A. Simmons and we
liis siuvi'.>sors, since IStlO,
I« r
F. Sirens Msdieina Co.
Ji
1
PROPRIETORS,
St. r.ouiH, Mo.
nnUCATIONAI
VERNER f^liUTARY INSTITUTE,
rU^KALÜOSA. ALA.
; "i pi. i
'll.'! ' Ip]
I ifr '
IRIAVERLY SPISTITUTE,
JIV».11.IA, MIMM.
.«i lx ih
. Will» fur .Ut4l
i. V.. li.lMM.L. V. M. t
•■I'll 1*
lo|
BETHEL MILITARY ACADEMY,
Ivr.lH WAKKK1STOV V\.
|.M>lim.Vln III*- soil I hi
• um" 11 mu 1.3 NI ul « " III
A. JloINTYUK.aupfc
Tin- h
/ i'll nii|illi'nUi>ll
X/ILLA RIDCE COLLEGE
W amt CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC.
IfjHI-tt
>, haii<t»oin*
«tf*l»MI. HUp*
far I'M I lit'
.. 1-pwM Valh'i, k>. (iNr U»UilU«K
Ii*-»# mlvnnlutfri»
il» tu<'
I One of th« bnit loontetl and «aulpi>»d »ehoot«
■ lor 01KLH in tho Houth. T«nnj» Ä tu^»»r»4®.
For furtbor Information. »(MroeTROBBllt Ä
MMll'II, l*r««liteiit, COLUMBIA, Taiinaaaee.
SPRING HILL COLLEGE
«IV III l.(M) k « MOllll.K II A V.
< <anj)l«itM CIhm»|(',i| aii'l Oointiirrclal ci
oi
four»#»
I boy«. l*'rr»b'h,U«im«n
rla» i tfr 1 .m ir l'ni m ff of I imeliarj.
BY RKV M MOT If til AN, ». J.
Frualdent, HiuiiiK Hill Coll«Ke, M09ILK, ALA.
L ouisiana State University,
A. mni ti. « m.i.Wa,
BATON 1 lOU.^lilf ZjA.
f ix scloutific amt lltoi ui y coursas. Jn
Biiyur- Ciiuriir to train oxpmtHia »ui(Ar
Kxj.i'iis«-« li s» iliHU £140 00 J J KR
TIIO»' I» llOt l»,4.»|. l |,
wit haut *■
nWH:
)neof th»
IQGAN COLLEGER ~
. I I III'ho'illl wi'Ml. •Ii'iiltll umilll'llMI
■■ il"u!mn nml K'li iilly i«|imlJo '^rmi
1 n-unoniil'k. .4. 0. »IKI'Hr.V. HI mLITIUH, II.
Ni'w Aih« iiV,(V|i4^iiyettr ('»**•
biK frt-i', * H u. I9in funiUb
s:
LEE BROt HERS,
AfTKTpfi
'WrÆHrlAmNuimsu
W
*•4 FKONTMT., NKNI'IIU, YKSIT,
Weeks Scale Works.
BUFFALO, ILL
8T0CK. COAL HAY, CHAIN,
AND COTTON RCA LES.
OPIUM
swift AVhUtevjr N«blt run»)
fit tiorii«* rtiliittiU finln. Honk of
piiritfulur. mm« FRKl:, H M.
WOOU.I.V M !>.. AlluiitM.Ua,
RDHP^V %MV «*«HIOVKflV« (Tltet
œ V «Illicit re,Iff «mlctm-a
*>»<>* »1 li-fliin at.«U ÄO«l IO û»f*
. II. II. I.Kt'fc.VH 4 II.hu, 41«.
I •rid m*-1»( Fret.
IIÎCHL Y S< ml for "«0« févtntloM
V4i>ul«-4. " Mf.r T.l* *4-t,-4*ir».j..'4.t.
GET RICH Q
Befit ( otj«h Hyrup. 'im-u-n Use
Hfiifl h» dniiTKld«.
In
3SK15|»ISIglËE
A. N K.-F
Wilt:» H HITIMI TO A ItYf K l IfeF.Bl<4
•■(Mir Hull you so w II» AiltertlM*
1070
»»••• ^

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