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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, September 09, 1897, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89065008/1897-09-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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DhSi'OTKM of lii lil.
lio v. J..;\ Tulin.Givon Hound Ad
Yo uiig Men.
Vico
th I*
•K
li.
III. »I <>.
»..•It II« VM
»V I!
I :.»• 1 1
tii
I.
1
!..
of
\\
11
g,
f.t
Y'.a
' 1 ." By
g it
ui
ilr«*d thons»
•d fu
t« I
til
rn t y .
I hero i •
win. bus
Then*
\ ast «
awed
cd ■
d n of bor
'd Ur tiic
ko-ping up
:;i « . But Glen*
ujj Mu
t'V 1 1
ud
»f
»•Vling
pill pl.N
legiUmuUi enterprise or -xpr
«•«I t«i g-l that vvh ich you i
lo without.. The first is right, the
money
If v
ther is wro
ugh of v
however plain,
■V
I
1
' k
i.) h
«•«.ut.
«I the
daiuiy'a o
the lilNt re v « » i 11 11 • • I
hu
ut tit. v«»
n of the
for tho u
v heel
takn
for !
Born
grade.

1.
ell.
lh.ri
r prospects !
ties; that
ay
the lu i ui o n; t.h
er in the
I he Bilde .list
etly Hays the Bor
u'vunt of the I«
It h
bad nt atu of t lungs
K"
he
y«j
do
e other at reel
to escape, j
1! s eing
of
espotiNi
heilig in do ht,
keep.
«.lid
of it Wh;
«lid debt do f.»r ^ a
ith v.
ing ul«
du.«»d him to take
•e the
II
What
Wall, i
•d at \b
gav nut
sin t , tl
ay fr« i
lit t t«*
if he had
» »I
. '
mil
at Abb
"W axle
lot.
ot
pie 'I
ud tii.it if y.i
with no. xpeetatioi
g« kn In
«I
If 1 go into a
ni 1 buy sugars and .*
i*
l-> intelltiol
a
if 1 go lato Hi
In n the
gr«"'.'
»V l till
•■tl the other
» • •
.•reha
•X of
idfoe
y off a ha
err ha
i! In the u
it's tii
»• 1
• . and 1 take
take the

r truhxfer
the
hih
tn. g.».«Os t«.«
ii « « <i
I t .Bo
uchant, and I vvn.t upon mvi' lf.
1 1 transfer the goods without auv
to him! la other
»f
tin*
.
Iv a
•ak thief is u,. 1
i tracts debts lie
•et» to
p.i v
an* fan
y Nh»
-da
to g.
i> other
They
half

tin-V
ing at the do
r of
!«'d bakers and butchers, und
d sappom
'vv spa per ca
\ «»a
do
"W.
It
sin »a bi
not know.
Meal
hu.x g<
e distant pa
ty, *!ul the pc«ip
thing to
d stopped thei
re to solicit the * ' \ a !
*f the
oustoi
loighbor.
uighbor, with grett
I' of uttblciKM*
d he. liie rn
eotuplueei
orders the finest steaks i:
d 111
d the highest
best «.{
p,»",d
•d 1 niits, and periinpH
dl
debts
An.I t!
luting until I»«* gets liis goo» is
•xt April in the furiture
on tin- .„uh of
No
chants fail
otidor that so ma
y of
r
business.
bankruptcy by these
nomads of city
lib They cheat the grocer out of the
green apples which make them sick,
ho attends them dur
ing their distress, and the undertaker
who tits them out for their departure
from tiu* neighborhood where they j
owe everybody when they pay tho
debt of nature, the only debt they
ever do pay.
They are
audrnug Arabs, the?
th«* physic
N
v our young men are coining up
ia this depraved state of commercial
ethie», uud I am holicitous about them.
ant to warn them against being
slaughtered on the sharp edge» of d-bt.
You want many things you hare not,
tuf juuvr friend*. You »hall huvo
I
! noil i
• x of
île vu -
if yon
bave pali.no,
Ml
J her
-lia/arl.
have I
very
tu
iat it. is 1
l""'P
• > I». npp >g oi
•th* v»>rd tiioi are
I - .•». ,t in gnih ant
.f i, the iii
I».-
he.a I
• -th- etcj. ity
; I II : ty f th- fU
g in an,
*J»t ;
f t
II. * •
i
Wi ■ fiai y an I of
mi fort » <j{ fe, I
• at; out ui the
hav, i
■i'VVII 1)1 —
.•( ala
n
up.
.
id,
i'. mtil h» t
' uralgla
i-, gets
and
let him
watch *
I he
id HW.
mid dunned,
oils «I
g, t -,
art dis
Ml,
arc any
■ i
the obsequies, j
dess I
v-iir.
belli»
s any
tic
11 » ■ r tin:
I
r cheap
i » • i* the ll.m-i
•ask-l j
or .1..- I

l.y the fa
>»• the deed
ell tic
sack
»!'•*, the j
iat 1res ,i-v t lie j. i L
... the
!mv
debt!
which be died,
or the sake of yot
for the halo
ou II hup
pi.
is, for the n;i k — of
... i'a
mrtttl
your
il. for
y u 11 g
poH.sihl-, kc-p out of «I«* lit.
Lut i Mi 11 » i
me young
slaughter-*!
away a young
make h
k n
•».ugh
i. Take
rrcligi«
n religii
the prey of evil.
■ that the Bibl '
WV all
is the only porfc«'
.V
orals,
destroy the y
tnke his Bilde
of
>ii want
i florals,
ill you

do that?
How
w ay.
Well, yo
«• his
rient
ill
ee for the Scriptures.
of til»' lii
take ail those
in-). lents
hieh
hie
made mirth of
Samson's
,1.
mil's
ill
Ada
« .eutri«*
Pi
off
all those h
#.
a
!l 11
Ml UN Vol
Now
Im
CH Of
t«j
.1 the Nor
s of
«1
lS j
the leur.
hu'k
• i
j
j
of lux Bibb*. Have
is to take
a substitute.
It
und
er than to
liciue,
p> and steal his crutch,
tha
Il paH|»,-r ami
to coûte to
house down,
rxt of ull larcenies to
stcu; tin- Bible, which has
mit'li and medicine and
eternal
; s crust,
a t)«> Ji
ll is the
been
food
In
d
to *o ma
in and inngnnnii
infidelity has gone into! This
What
splitting up of lifclamtH and taking j
■ -;,V "f H.*- . I-'. ■»»>• I. xtinjri»,si,i„» f
lM, t ""'l .""■*■
«* you doing all
''juxt for
nucIi p«-oj
this for?
of
1 C.
• What
"Oh." thev s
fun." It
ch fun to
to the ; r Bibles! Mi
■of
try to hold oi
.'"*'
,a ' , j j
j
j
tliei
have lost
old that there
of the i
•recti
M:i
hav«* b. ! i c v « • < 1 that v hi ist
•ame t<« carry the h
d to heal ;
l it is !
rdc i
the
I
they
tell
the»
it'lt
to
b
their
to
Think of the
'.most thing
;
vci* heard of; tliei
j
ill find !
stairs 100
feet
it, a
you
ÿ of !»
»ro to till' but,
ill find
c « * the foot of the lad
ladder 1
•S long; thoi
off a
precipice half !
I
ill !
her,* to ' liin.i. and v<
fr»
find the headquarters of the
eanticî
that
mild rob llii.
if its only
comf. r* in life, its only peace in death, |
* for immortalitv. |
nlv li
an s faith i
»I.
a young
• t much more left to
'
N
hat has bee,:
eof the slnugh
;
.
i
ot »« is
are m the!
t. red? Well,
father's or
unie of thei
■ other'* In
' 1
, i
■' l ; m '- "I" 1 °}' I T. r Y ,n - V o(
. " I." naU.Mv.l all h»s<miv[
s, i, u,»n jn to put .i
»is ot vom
u n H
»at.oiis t » protect you,
or «*(»»» proM'-t von. Ap^-al»!»«
to > ..«1 fori, ..,,,.„,1, „«younalf.
I »rsi, l..,v,. n roo.„ »o.,».,vl, P ra that
do
health.
ailing t(
u u lioipitni, others
• r, rather, their bodies ar
f««i their »,)ii!
t » « , i» . N »tin
Lo retribu
u, ii pi « »xpei't for
• vo '}"* !
man wh*. started life with goo,l health, j
d g.jo.t education, and a t hristmn !
«• xample h<
fulness
then

to ix
who
j
•s and put 1 1
in one box. and
dropped it into the sea.
this wholesale slaughter
opped? Tlier
. hi
is not ;
person
that question.
«>? interested t
i'he obje t of
•i;>'
n defense. Wail not for young
hri.stinn ;
in each of your h;
. n. Whether it be
the buck parlor of u fashionable board
iug-houxe. or a'room iu ti»« fourth
story of a cheap lodging. 1 care not.
Only have that ono room your fortress,
Lot not live dissipater or uue'.eau step
you can cull your
i ov«r the threshold. If they corné up
'ho $ung flight ->f htair* and knock at
ti •* door, un «ft tt-i.flu th «I U i fat«
kindly vet fini. If rrftuc
Hav* a few
the iva!If you
it It yOn ft'tin our
the
a.-i'i
ti. m ad cotta ace.
I family portrait»
cal-m-.mght them •
stand, if you el
, have aii m -'n ifient of music
. Hav.* a Hii>!
IT-ml it and c;>:
1 piny
Jiutc, or
IO. K
■ry im
uvm that r«i»»in pray,
no 1 m
ing b»*fore
gut aft-r
i;
Make tliatrof
i bra ir, yourc istopol, your Mount
/.ion. Let no Bad book
-
.cwspaper
uro that room any mor- than I
.»•j id allow a cobra to coil ou
v oil
your t ie
.»If. Nobod v else
I- hel|
of ..
Tak
I
v j 11
vi 11 t;...- -a
Y<
oi , hi
four
.time.,
help will «orne
fit
•me up,two,
flight** »»f stair»;
throuj i» the roof, d >wp fr«»i
ft >m i iat God m 6.0 ■) ) year* of ;
rldN hist«
led
to
:ard
timi
pa,-.:
those
.lowed. Murk uiv winds,
, a,.<i tn.uk of it thirty
now. You
re hu t . y
y-.ui.g mu
. find that
1
H
.. from How
be rnil iinHi' ■» of this country, j
ni tor. of tne country.
..1,., in.* till? pucU of
itry, w
,ists 1
church !
.f the ci
i thro
1
All! when I told you to
' » ii If, you misunderstood me if you j
t ; i . ht I m -au l you are t<» depend
■ » unman n solutlou, which may bo
vod iu tn • fo.im of the wine cup.
- m.iy be blown out with the first
j.Mist • J temptut io:i. Here is tin hulmet,
iii. s vor«i of tin* Lord God Almighty,
* .oiln* yourself in tiiat panoply, and
shuii ii«>t be put to confusion. Sin
•r in this, world nor the
«1 right be
n» -,
y
pays well neii
next, but rigid thinking,
1 right i
\ OI
igb this life ami ii
i ext.
traita
»ugh the
I 1
a
It w »
treu»«
rcry sin
pray-r, l»at vv
i> prayer: "» >li, Loi «1, help
IS. Wo 111
1 il v.-r
ord help
■oU.
i'luit prayer, 1 «warrant
thee;
i r-ft'di.-d llis heart.
of Go I.
And there are u hundred
ho
hav.
d out—a thousand young
, perliapi. who have found out that
very easy to do
hard to do right. I got
* paragraph,
,, . llliU1 ' V ^ uull k Illui ol 1,1 I
t-llig-nee. aid *nt strive»*« after that
ry thing. It is !
v roil g.
Jy
hirh ! shall read;
ved a round so
ewhat, I
f
have ri
lli . th«--w iNp forluuc -uml of
•«mid speak.
He
of th
a
g English i
of 'J,J nr 24 years,
Nm
vh
York,
when
to
he
ha i
ith
H-quaintanees,
•p him
He had
sulli.-ieilt
.
to
iple of
been
I slum Id say
l ivajr* not used t o
ing his living, and fourni it ex* j
•iitfi«'nit to get any position
that lit'.u as ■ capable of filling. After i
I i reel
rear 'd, perhat
Umdcrlv.
!
!
he :
•il'.rt a i
this
found hi
Brook!v
.lay
evening in
vith about
i ' h : rr .
•e
left «»f lus .simili capita!.
l'rovidei
lend lib
d.
to y
lie de ten
and heary<
Ml-.l tO go
"lie B.'m
hi.N going to I
iou
his life, for vv h«
,»rch h • fell de-q
that night
cdlv the I
mu* ch
rate,
bis
ding th.- depths !
ahm» brou Mit
itcry. 1 truly
m e got the
believe
told
w hat tl
iu* that y.i
of h iN hea u I t im
Ui ii
hack to his
ho
so
Hear
That ii t
multitudes.
i* echo ol
j
abstra
pot
great
i, but a
peu.'
eality.
>: pr.uli^ul .VOIIIIK
hearted voting
this «lav, the
best
friend
lie meets }
not that cinoti
it i
face of Christ. Lift
father's G » » 1. t . you
had.
a man
this
over
i .sing
'
divinely lifted.
Look into the
• prayer to your
■ mother's God, and
this morning get the pardoning bless
hi le 1 speak, you
f ()l *.j 4H
ri ,,'V;|
aa.u.
re at
of tho road, and this
the
d that is the wroug r«*ad,
you start on tin* right road,
(tut* SaMuith morning, at the close of
a gold watch of the
ned uud deeply-lamented
'member he
the servi, -e. 1 si
violinist, Ole Bull. V
died in his island homo off the coast of
Norway. 1'hat gold watch he had
j wound up dav after day through liis
i then he said to hi*
;
!
lust illness,
eompuiiion: "Now. i vvaiitto wind this
watch as long ns 1 can. and then when
1 am gone 1 want you to keep it wound
up until i*. goes
I Dore
to my friend, Dr.
;
k, nnd then he
j will keep il wound up until his life ia
l then l want the watch to go
oung son, my especial favorite."
ho more th;
•tist hud made the violin
New Y
!
'i'll«' great mu.sicu
• other
speak and sing and *veep and laugh
l triumph for it seeinml when he
I drew the bow across the strings as if
all earth and Heaven suivered in de
lighted sympathy -the great mu
rooui looking off
\ surrounded by
instruments of mu
l his eves in death.
!
|
| 7.
the sea,
up,
' his
favorite
While nil
do. ch
mourniug at his depart
*»x fell into
; the world vv
uro, 16 crowded »team«,
i line of funeral procession
the
to curry
mainland. Then)
•ere 50,00J of his country men gath
1 ored m un amphitheater of the hills
vvuitiug to hear the eulogium, ami
•hen the groat orator of
the day with steutorian voice began to
i speak, the 50,000 people on the hill
Uw« bur»t into te
tlu . clu<c ()f H Hfc t , mt Kmil
•h to make the world happy*
Hut l have to toll you. young -man.
if you live right nnd die right, that
I was a tamo »ctiue compared .with
j that which will greet you when from
j pj^iigriesof heuveu the one hundred
{i mi forty and four- thousaud »hall ao
cord with Christ iu crying; "Well done
j T | lou x aa a fnitliful servauL" ......
, , u „ ulll _ V!l tlial on t . arthj ou pot in
: moll|)U wiu do Wn from
Rouertttion u>ff< . n ,. r »Uou. the influent.
i you wound up luiudcd to your children.
! and their iuffueueo.s wound up and
children, until watch
more needed to mark
! it w,
j
!
Oh! that was

!
!
And
,
j i lum \ Cl i to thei
j H nd clock
the progress, because time itself shall
be no longer.
»VI» IMVUUS [
)•"'»' JOArjUrt. I
Iha Trouble* Between Thom Scam !
to Hava No Ei.J. !
APACHKS .
KslMtlutf
Affair*
III«- lOllMfUU
I'ecullnr Hint«- '»f
Alontf the l.lne
m «he I
Ill
illfonila.
!
1
of j . \t<, .... desert and tin In- »
1
0.) letter J
ispccu: !•
ecu the white
tie
lii
I j ((]
ii{ t j H .
ever-e
•cupatiui.
■hiiicii ;
m.lian «traps. 1 L
artii g j,. ..ut» un- Kingman.
*. These towns
desert, and the
i-fens- and oITcum-.
ininc j : uspcctors get their sup
\ a j j
;
•ip.:
■ Ari# 1 ...i, V • |.r
.d
t'
I chief outs
the Needle* and Moji
;
•'•kirt lh
Mo.iav.;
. and. of co
utninni,
'bisky. These
of
'ai I road cei
mu ha ! f-breed > and des - ;
lit
e of mining ;
ramps, In
t «laddered ;
i tv pit lI i
trnvd-r
vus. Her- tin
ungh"
» !'«• treaque vie\
t routi er
mi. There ;
two
veral salomis and n
j get -rill
f
gu»c
and ;
\\ hi sky
lic-ti ics.
ire tin*
1 At all !:• : i s of the day and night the
! sal
principe »
!. 1 gaming lions«
Imieed, it is «kiu'otful if sonic of them
de«!.
«lour-, ns timv are not
hr
1 Lumber fm the desert is a costly it«
i. j
j
7"
- \ .: X\
; viv i
■ Jp?
'jM
iiih
i
/
:] \Mmi
» •■ £&
m».
\
-•
9.

Ay
ix
rr
n ;
L^jl
7m
-4.
T i
X
Am/
ml
L *■
t
y
W<
Wit
i i r
I
APACHE INDIAN CAMP IN ARIZONA.
the prevailing
games of fashion. Americans patron
ize the former, while the Mexicans and
Indians take the latter.
The monotony of frontier life is re
Indian hunt. News has
been received tant the "desert Indians,"
I us all tribes are styled by the frontiers
, , ■ ■ .
men. haie murdered a miner. A mmi
Fnrr
and monte
ber of the moat desperate characters
start out
ake good Indians" of th«»
first Indians they may meet. These
? heavily armed with long-dis
e shooting rifies, a belt full of eart
•volvers each ami a
ie knife. A miner has bee
m
ta
ridges, a brace of
b
j
i
sutTcr,
e beeu
dered, and !
gh the murder
India
must
! roiuniitted by some paleface desper
! ado for the purpoae of robbery. Fre
prospectors go out on the
company. They may locate
and* in order to get it
: min cers the other, and returns !
: quently
sert
ich clai
all
»th a hair-lifting story to
tin* .'fi'.'.'t that his partner had been
ii'i i'd by "Injuns." i
A 11 is*e
1 he m
out
I Hi
tt so little
's life that it
s thev
licit.
kills the first
g. They h:
qiicstiOU
Inn ;
.rat'd for n
uikes little difference
li. ther the Indian is guilty or not.
! Frequently he Is guilty of some other
murder. But this is not known to his
thei

Consequently the relatives
of the murdered Indian
nxsasai ns.
j path and kill the first miner they see.
The Indian will stealthily creep along
lue or under the ledges
•k* and as the miner approaches
of r<
Hi
b
v
;
M '1
V
; • v/Âs. . 4
\vu vkif
sä v
• ;
i* < ' jMM
AN APACHE TRAILER.
on the sandy trail he is shot down in
revenge for a murder with which lie
connection. His horse, pro
taken by the In
dian. When he, in turn, is killed,
* brought into town
trophies, and furnish argument for
the ''extermination of the Indian.*'
As a rule the I ml i;
ia
had
visions and arms ;
these
if
are harmless if
it is the desperate characters
•her
■ accuse the
let alone.
ho keep up the vendetta. Ifar;
•s a beef, he
, though the desert swarms with
*s and ot lo r animals.
yi at »:
India
coy, «
There is no doubt that Indians do
steal both cattle and horses; but there
the desert w ho are in the
line of forbidden industry. But
ith these crimes
others
same
the Indian is charged
until they lire proven
This furnishes
of
to
ao
in
some paleface,
•xetise for killing un
henevera desperado w ishes to
killer. The Indians
1 nil i<
make a record
have no lands, and, being mere vaga
bonda of the desert, they seek to live
on the pale face who has denpoi led them.
Some of them are industrious and work
in the mines and some prospect for
themselves, but no sooner does one
find a claim of any value than along
comes a paleface deS|>erndo nnd drives
him a way, or Kdl* him, and covers the
corpse with sand, or perhaps leaves it
on the road as food for coyotes. The
ads and trails are strewn with dead
bodies of both white people and Indi
ans, more as the result of these feud*
than from hunger and thirst. The drift
ing sands conceal many bodies, which
nr«* discovered months after the persou
has disappeared. There is a hole in the
head or bark, which tells the story of
«SMissiuation. In this dry atmosphere
a dead body will L?t decompose for
month*, and will look a« natural
UJ o»i as in life. so. unless tlic"ranuin,s
hav# raten the llesh.tbe Uxlycan.lwost
«]»■ ay» be identified.
The Indian, n! the «lecert pome», the
knowledge of thewhereaboutsofununi
iiidden around in t!ie
ber of springs
•hieh they re
ledges and under rocks
, tell to the white miners.
trailed in every direction,
also know the locu
* of theI
tiou of some very
which they all
valuable mines
refuse to reveal,
•eusionally bring in quali
ties of gold dust which they sell
at the stores principally for whisky
- goods. They are frequently
little id» .1 of the
but
swindled, for they h;
value of gold dust or gold nuggets.es*
lolly \vl». , ii • .Id l.v the white man's
weight, and w-.gheil on varying scales.
Not on |y me these Indiana tracked
m j killed* by desperadoes who lire ly
j,,g in wait for some one else to And
-something 'finable, but white pros
-ctors also
charged to the
e killed, and all
se he is ;
been
vonder tha
h.j
it is
seeing that he is protected neith
er by the laws of God nor man.
ht- becomes i
i-agabond
outlaw in
iany case
vhieh l ea
i j* t/d a ted,
e to be true, for frnter
A pathetic eus
scarcely beliei
rial love is as strong in the breast of tho
red man as of any other race. A
lo killed an Indian to get pos
of his mine. The dead man's
killed the murderer, and
diito
drape
sea
cousin
tun
until he had killed sev
ght his revenge
did not stop
cral others and t h
as
irt
the Me
plete. VYhe
cd at the
station," the usual raiding
ized, a number of In
was
party
as orga
ere killed, and linlly it
dia ns
learned that this particular Indian had
a brother among the few that had been
captured. He was told to return to his
camp and bring back to.them the head
of his biother, the murderer. Fuilin
they would organize u large party and
exterminate all the Indians on the Mo
desert. The Indian soon returned
with the ear of another Indian, which
lie said was that of his brother, whom lie
had slain. The desperadoes wanted more
proof. Under threats the Indian did re
turn with the head of his brother. This
seemed to appease the wretches, and
no massacre followed. It is believed,
however, that .i white mun assassinated
the murderer and compelled the broth
er to bring in the head, and claim that
lie murdered his
However, sineo that time the Indian
: morose and has taken to
the warpath. He has followed tlie trail
brother.
has beer
the miners through the ravines and
canyons and shot down, a paleface
whenever found. At last accounts lie
has assassinated nine men and two
women, none of them being u party to
the deed
hellish rove
Indian trn
Inch drove ldm to seek such
t!ies(
•s are often
renegades
there
pedil ions, for
among the red
. The trailers hang around the
oil
s Other
the life of vng;
» forsake
bond:*go and become sufficiently civ
ilized lo betray their people—for a
price. They arc, however, not trusted
by the whit
devpormlocs attempt to "regulate" the
town, they occasionally shoot one ot
these domesticated Indians, "just to see
him fall." When off duty, the trailers
s, arrows and pottery to tour
ists at the railroad depots. These;
made by the squaws and children--the
Indian brave generally considers it be
neath liis dignity to labor. The squaw
does the cooking, gathers the wood,
and brings in the brush for the con
struction of their rude huts.
The Indian trailer is selected for his
keen eyesight and sharp hearing. Along
the trail, almost obscured by drifting
sand, he can see the footprints which
tell him whether it is that of an ln
people, and whe
a few
H?
a white man, and the number.
V bruised or bent twig or blade of
sign he readily rend*» nnd by
;he imprints around the camp fire lie
reads the number of campers and their
movements. He shades his eyes with
his hand and looks into the distance
nnd discerns human figures which to
the ordinary o;
perhaps not seen at all.
cur to the ground, and, rising, points
in a certain direction, and grunts:
cloud
of dust is seen, and if the palefaces are
numbers, they stand nnd re
ceive it with u volley. Otherwise they
fly toward camp, for it is a band of sav
age i'iutes sweeping down upon them,
and perhaps a massacre follows.
J. M. SCAN LAND.
dia
black speck, or
lie pinces hii
' Umph, heap, mnny. Presently
in larg
\m-nl IniproN
«•nf.
The deaf and dumb young lady was
conversing on her lingers with a friend,
going to have my voice culti
"P
she «jïelleel.
va led,'
Whnt manicure parlors
do y ou patronize?"— N. Y. World.
How nice!
l.ix-oiile I'npn.
Gertrude (eagerly) — i'apn, did Mr.
Harper call on you to-day?
Mr. M Illy un» —Yes.
Gertrude—Well, what followed?
Mr. Millyun»—The ambulance.—
Cleveland Leader.
Upportnnltle*.
"Opporehunities," said Uncle Ebeti,
"is pretty »ho* ter come tor ebry man.
But it'« u mighty good idee, jes' de same,
foh him ter hustle rotin' an' send out a
few invitation»."—Washington Star.
Mental Ptrntn.
"How much insanity develops in hot
weather."
"Yes; people lose tlieir minds when
their icc bills com« iu."—Chicago Rec
ord.
In Ther« t'HS«-rf
Though chicken post* but fourteen cent*.
In Joke-* It's always found
The chicken pl« I» mads from veal.
Which costs eighteen * pound.
— h. T. Journal.
PERSONAL AND LITERARY.
—Prof. Marsh, who holds the chair of
paleontology at Yale, has drawn noaal*
ary for his services since lbOti.
—Mr. Kuskin's health has improved,
and he is interesting himself in the pub-
lication of the addresses delivered by
him at Oxford on landscape painting.
---Mirth Mary Rachel Dobson, the eld
est daughter of Austin Dobson, the
English poet, has joined a missionary
for college women in Horn
bay. She is a graduate oi London uni
versity.
*t t ImIIIC
—Kiss Nellie Patterson, a young
woman of Mount Carmel, Conn., has
complei-d a four-years' apprenticeship
to the machinist trad-and proposes to
undertak.- toalmaking a* her *|»ec»al
ilne °* work -
—Assistant Secretary of State Day
mu bas-ball crank. When Judge Day
was a studeutat the University of Mich
igan he played on the 'varsity nine and
he lias inner lost interest in th- sport,
misses
ton and is usually accompanied by one
more of his four sons.
—An evangelist named F. \Y. Sand
ford has established an institution in
Durham, Me., to which he lias given
the que
Us Bible school."
that all other Christians except them
selves are on the wrong road. Sandford
casts out devils every day and claims
to be in personal communication with
God.
ame in Washing
Ile seid
f "The Holy Ghost and
llis followers believe
mine
Louise Michel, the t
mobbed the other day at Lillf*:* where
she was to give a lecture. A crowd of
a rcli ist,
vus
thousand persons
ad station
ct her at the rail
vith
ith cries of "Dow
"Down with anarchy!
Duck her, duck her!
and had to be scattered by a large for
of police. Her lecture in the evening
was listened to without interruption,
but there was a
Louise Michel ! 1
"ifoul hou!"
at the close.
MISSIONARY BANKING.
31 et ho «1* by Which Hr.,000,000
In IH.ni rlhutcri III Over the Mnrtli.
It is estimated that about $5.000,000
a year is sent abroad by the treasurers
of the different foreign missionary
boiirds of this country and with such
an amount the matter of exchange and
other items of expense becomes «if con
siderable importance. This money is
sent to nil corners of the earth, and
the handling of it keeplf busy a great
many clerks.
Each foreign board treasurer seems
n way of transmitting
money to foreign ^fields. Nearly 30
years ago the Methodists adopted a plan
which their secretaries declare cannot
be improved upon. The plan is this:
A secretary draws a three-day draft
the treasurer of his own board. This
draft he mails to a missionary in some
part of the globe». The missionary
cashes the draft at any local bank. No
missionary is permitted to draw on the
treasurer of his home board. Only a
lx>ard secretary is authorized to sign a
draft.
Y ci
to have his
Some advantages of this plan arc:
bank
1. The saving of the cost of
draft, because the secretary uses his
n draft. 2. The saving of interest
while the money is in transit. 3. A
gaining of time. To illustrate the lat
ter advantage it is
out that, were a draft purchased at a
bank, the money or its collateral would,
of e
df ul only to point
o to be forthcoming to pay
Under the ph
retarv sends the draft to t h«» missionary
for it.
in us«» the see
whether he has the ready money or the
collateral in hand at the moment or
One to three months are r
the
tha t t ime the n
i red for
ails to bring the draft back. By
•y is in hand.
The American Church Missi
'hieh is auxiliary to the 1'rot
ary so
estant Episcopal board of mirsions, two
years ago adopted a plan somewhat
similar to the foregoing. Previous to
that time it had been buying London
exchange and paying many dollars an
nually for the same. Now the secre
tary issues a letter of credit to the treas
urer of the mission, in Brazil, for ex
ample. On this letter the treasure
reiving it draws draft« up to its amount,
which di'afts he gets cashed at his local
bank at the current rate of exchange.
The same advantages in saving of cost
of exchange, in interest, and in time
accrue as under the plan employed by
the Methodist board.
The Presbyterian board still uses
drafts on London. Tho treasurer of the
foreign board draws a draft
English bank. Ijt th;« bankjie keeps a
balance* by buying bills of exchange
here. As interest is allowed on bal
ances by the Loudon bank, little is lost
except the cost of the hill of exchange.
Under all of these plans the amount
the missionary gets
with the fluctuation in the exchange
rate. For Instance: In October, 1895,
the Presbyterian foreign board
£ 200 to Brazil, and it netted 5.250 niil
reis. Last October it sent, the same
sum and it netted 6,000 milreis, a differ
ence of almost $200.
a
ot
r ro
the
of
by
lie
to
re
varies of - course
sent
or
In Africa the drafts of the Methodist
board are similar, in both appearance
and availability, to United
money. Some are issued for as small
a sum
States
.'5 cents. They passas readily
us currency nil along the const and in
many parts of the interior. Often they
are many months, in some coses years,
in being returned to the home office for
redemption.—Church Economist.
MUnt llim- llt-cn.
First Man (cracking joke as he tastes
soup)—Eh? Ha! 1ml ha!
Second Man (catching joke ns he
tastes soup)—lln-ha! ha-ha! ha-ha-lm!
Third Man (ditto as ditto)—Wahl
Ha-ha! ha-ha! Wa-uh!
Wu i t ress— H ow* ly h i v i n s !
soup wasn't idled from a funny bone!
— N. Y. Press.
If that
» «MiMtnntlnopI«
Tulips nr!' lrni.'h cultivated in ('on
stantinople nail there is a tulip festival
there once a year, ii, spring. Kvery pal
liée, room, palh i'y uml parden is deco
rate,! with tulips of every kind. At
niirht they are all lighted by colored
lamps and Bengal fires. — Pittsburgh
Dispatch.
Tulip FVntlvnl.
a
II«» Ltkc«l the Family.
"Dick proposed to me last night."
"Whatdid you tell him?"
"I said he had better ask
mamma;
and what do you think the wretch
su id?"
"He said he had
ami she
Beacon.
isked her already,
couldn't, have him."—Boston
Sew« to Him.
'Tapa, how do the people in the
weather bureau find out what kind of
weather
•e arc going to have?"
"1 didn't know they did, my son."—
Youkera Statesman.
WIT AND WISDOM.
—Tm sure I'JI never be able to walk
up the aiale with papa." "Why not.my
child?" "Papa is so awfully l ow
geared."—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
—"Do you suppose scorching- is th*
cause of all these bicycle fact« we see?"
".Shucks, no! In nine cases out often
it's the installment plan."—Truth.
—She—"I am quite sure y
•h champagne when you called
rue yesterday afternoon." He—"Yes* I
thought I'd just look around to-day to
s engaged to you."—Punch.
—"1 am told your wife would rather
cook than cat." The other glanced
nervously over his shoulder. They were
alone. "What she cooks—yes," he re
plied, in a hoarse whisper.—Detroit
Journal.
had too
• n
see if 1
—"Cruelty in this institution!"
the superintendent of the prison;
siree. The inmates hen* know rue too
well to attempt any monkey business*
that might lead to cruelty."—Philadel
phia North American.
—"The British government," said the
Turkish minister, "would not consent
to the permanent occupation of Thes
saly,
tn n ;
said
no,
"That's all right," said the sul
•e intended merely a temporary
•upation, similar to that of Egypt.**
—Puck.
—"It is getting." said the pessimistic
man, "that a United States senator
can't preserve his self-respect." "Oh, I
d*nno," said the optimist; "there are
chances for him to clear enough to
make him have a pretty good opinion of
himself."—Indianapolis Journal.
—-He lifted his mackinaw from his
glowing brow and nervously dabbed
his handkerchief at his moistened hair.
"Heaven help me," he murmured, "this
esort!" Then he added, in a
constrained tone: "All the other land
lords know me!" — Cleveland Plain
Dealer.
is my last
GENIUS AND STATURE.
The Incorrect llelief That Nearly All
" Men Arc Little.
\Ye may safely conclude from the fig
ures that the faith cherished by many
that nearly all great men are little—a
very venerable faith, as indicated by
the ancient sayings collected in Bur
ton's "Anatomy of Melancholy" con
cerning great wits with little bodies—
is absolutely incorrect. Some deduc
tion must doubtless be made in view
of the fact that
the basis of the general population,
while the majority of men of geniuf
belong to the educated classes. This
deduction would tend to equalize the
two extremes, but that it would not
medium is made on
destroy the slight preeminence of the
tall men of ability is perhaps indicated
by the fact, shown by the anthropo
metric committee, that the stature ol
98 fellows of the Royal society (who
from the present point of view may be
counted
men of genius) was nearly
half an inch above that of the profes
sional class to which they
long. At the same time it is clear that
the belief in the small size of great
men is not absolutely groundless
There is an abnormally large propor
tion of small "great men.
diocrity alone that genius seems to
abhor. While among the ordinary pop
ulation the vast majority of 68 percent
was of middle height, among
the present investiga
te only 2? per cent., the
ally be
It is me
■n ol
far
genius, s
tion goes, they
tall being 41 per cent., instead of 16,
and the short 37, instead of 16.
The final result is, therefore, not
;tal
that persons of extraordinary
ability tend either to be taller or short
er thf
the average population, but
rather that they tend to exhibit an un
usual tendency to variation.
Even in*
•turc men of genius pre
■haracteristic which
physical str
other
sent
grounds we may take to be fundamental
in them; they are manifestations of th«
variational tendency of a physical and
psychic variational diathesis.
There are certainly ut least two types
of short men of genius; the slight,
frail, but fairly symmetrical type (ap
proaching what is called the true
dwarf), and the type of the stunted
giant (a type also to be found among
dwarfs proper). The former are fair
ly symmetrical, but fragile; generally
with little physical vigor or health, all
their energy being concentrated in the
brain. KJnrt was of this type,
stunied giants arc usually more vigor
ous, but lacking in symmetry. Far from
being delicately diminutive persons,
they suggest tall persons who have been ,
cut short below; in such the brain and
viscera seem to flourish at the expense
of the limbs, and whije abnorm aj they
have tho good fortune to be ro
mind and body. Lord*.
Chesterfield was n man of this type,
•ith à
Tbe
ofte
bust both i
short for his size, thick set,
head big enough for a Polyphemus?"
Hartley Coleridge carried the same type
to the verge of caricature, possessing
a large head, a .sturdy and ample form,
with ridiculously small arms and legs,;
so that he was said to be "indescribably
-"Poet
elfish and grotesque.
Squab"—was again of this type, as wa*
William Goodwin; in Keats the abnor
mally short legs coexisted with a small
head. The typical stunted giant ha«»
large head; and such stunting of th«
body has, indeed, a special tendency
produce large heads, and therefor«
doubtless those large brains w hich are
usually associated with extraordinary
intellectual power.—Havelock Ellis, i»
Nineteenth Century.
Dryden
W
Heavy Hair nnd Insanity.
Someone has discovered that very
heavy heads of hair arc productive of
insanity. On the strength of this an*
nouncement the youth with the
of baseball tresses need not feel oblige
to sacrifice them on the tonsorial oltat
—it doesn't apply to him. The theofj
was discovered and advanced in thf
interests of the lady who might beeoOJ
a Sutherland sister, if other means <s
support failed. Heavy plaits, coils and
Psyche knots mossed on the back w
the head nnd tugging at the base of tb*
brain are productive of all sorts ^
mental ills. It is the wispy-haired if
male whose scant tresses may he co#
fined by a single pin who is always#
the front rank of all social reform# -
her progress is never impaired by
hirsutnl drawbacks, as witness
heads of
, but it would be
to give the Indies* names.
The empress of Austria belong«*«! to
quintet of sisters famous alike fortW
magnificent hair and other extreme
eentricities. Pcrehnuce these
trious ladies might have led calfflfl
happier lives had it not been that'
possessed such a weighty w ealth of
that her head could not have kept'
literally speaking, in any cirOI
•tances.— N. Y. World.

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