OCR Interpretation


The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, October 15, 1904, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89065008/1904-10-15/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

X
■•%
r
A Marvel in Animal
Education in Germany
!
j
J
The Wond/r Horse** of Berlin Described by Prof.
Arno« W. I*at»<?
of Northv*. cMern Um veriity.

!
yc
t it
3k
ftr.
ah d
m
K '
V;
. 1 » pn 4!»t
am
Indeed, his ««
K.u tin- seien tilh »
him tin- fiii/h
highf'Ht eirel« - n,i
Ilf«
of fh**
mini
und pro
oil
»I till!
capital, ami
,li,
ident« to
Berlin's v
Hllcd. I« n y a
he
old
lis
teacjuT who.
/♦rnfc is
ft ret 1 » I • I (M J :
ht pi l
ro-ver been broke
I « «ui
-• bo>
limuelr
Daily hi
r ha
m t run
ed him p iv r. a tili». I; In. a ; :
fabln, halb
of the no » :
I» hot hood
tin
fielghborli
«low« upon ti»* Ilttlf
a in
iqti" m bool
!!•
> ii it.
i.y his
i. ti
MlllClif
of • 11,1
till
him :
I w,
mil \ Ho
I
tat
In the
stable I
Hi 11.
rt on to wh ich Ih
jKM
■ h
h
pf».
f"-r -V/ -///Z
rï'wH'
tm «L-- '
re
W'Vt'r
4
î wm *
•r - ' a -
/Mk
r :
! Wj
■.
V
7
'rtCw i,w
\f
v'
I
,
V, ~ 11
it
V|p y;
! m H
u
m
r'\
I
i
,k i'% V» ;
r.c
; IrT '
' »I«
ii
Qvi^&g I»- ;
■Hs&l _
re.
«*
f

Ti
: : IN VV O N 1 1 ! , 11 M«»|{HK Ills 'll! A] NICR
\TIUN.
A N I »
MI'I.KMKNTH
in m s ii
op« MH. I I OUI
" •
noble
noted Airl
and student of animals, k« v
na., a number of I miic« and
ti high social •lumiiug, be
Hit* iluhf oi Meidxlcu
Schilling, ;i
man, li it
n exp,".
oral pi >■ »
gent l**ii.v
Hid«'»« Hi
n espomlenl h of fondgi
Hans" is « beautiful h
■v, he
low.
IS put J
mnl« r of t he J
ci ««'s t In
for. «luring nearly tw«
through his « -km
flUtlb'l
hcHUH. in 'tisw «-r ti
«I ' IN
«pi' sl i«»iis from hi v
tii«' audicnc«*, I
ma te« .hi - -a -î u
he c<nild «'ount, iuid sub- 1
h<* h.
tract, nm 11 ; « *i v. do simple sums in free- 1
lions, distinguish between the aexen
tones ol tin muHicul scale, pick out a
in the audience whose photogiaph !
»diowri. single out the men j
mm n «liKtingui.-h the »tu
h<* bud In*«
from the w
bats from Uo
ore at u given j
»h«d.h»'r a plwo «if mom \
!<•!! hats, indicate uni j
brcIlBH or « i
•11
here the large or
Hiunil bands
nimncnt. toll
w.»-. gold, idlvcr. nickel
a watch
nd
ciippcr
also ith cbnominal Ion, ami hp«'II mm.
riven to him
Ills laiiKuage is tin* tap
pin« of bl« right front loot lb m* 1
letter by the number
of taps, tIn. spelling by tapping until
be culm s to tin* number of tie* letter lu
•hr
« ales a
flu* alphnhet <
tap, «diver by I
eopIMT by fou»
l«»ltl In lea« t eg bint numbers i he rn
tw has used a reckoning tablet aid
black board
lold is Indicated by one
vo, nickel by thr»v and
Similarly the colors are
Ou Un oivoöioü a bo
.* noted there
were present iu the little court ;i'
Boris
liana
lH*r
TU«- petbou
ho interrogated
i or.
» t< ai lo r, but II
as not
Heb il ling, ik«- .urban explorer, win* had
known the horse about two weeks It
was evident that it waa no look or n< lion
of histeaclict that prompted theat \mts,
as js the «•;«,»' in th«* stock « \hihition.
of clim ated animals, hut the int«!;igent
com pi eli elision of the horse
many parsons are here?" wa • the first
question The hoi>e gave
at the crowd uud then struck tlu-ground
aw in glance
Ho
With his hoof .'to times,
have straw hats'.'
How many ha
Ilm
many
Three taps; correct.
feltbaU? F.iglit laps«; I
I
A photograph wan shown the hors*, j
of »in officer who a few days before had
been present in his uniform. Han«
correct
j
ashed if the man were present to-day. j
»IV indicated (always counting frum |
left to right î the exact number of the j
officer In the semicircle He was asked
to toll the colors in the cap of a certain j
officer. One stroke of the hoof, then nn |
Interval followed by five strokes thus I
pointing out red and blue, which corre
spond I» the respective numbers in the
■>rieituot io scale.
The dill e of Mecklenburg held his
waieh up to the hors» and said "On
Beyond the Limit.
"Your woi -l enemy Is win ,kv ' said
the parson to an incorrigible
of iiis flock.
"Hut,
"you hay,- .dwaya told us to love
en Guiles '
"Yes," admitted the good mi
1 never told you to swallow them."—
Cincinnati Enquirer
Good Advice
Master Tommy,
ph'vntlver Is th' mattlmr?
Tommy- I've hurt my ti-bam! iu th'
h-but water.
etulter
protested 11,,* wayward
"hut
Bridget Why,
I
the mall hi
id of the
•:»/ k
J
I
I
*. »
Ti.
'it
it iacio-d tea
*rcnnipH«h.J
■ of th«- M,.,hvr f. ..t ri. j
<.c c*,n« ■ mint; animal in* I
< d.
mini, -e
id bus huet
q*n
mid the psy« h»»!(>|
:y of animal
nd afford« iu
<*}»
i;ttf»rlai for stud# r. » 1 !
oector of the Her- j
ha* witoHwed the j
!
I {. rr v«»n tisfen, the owner of » !*!•
!
•ef i a» . u »ri'* ni ManH, and was no «troff«
■hi that In
Habe
ernte a
i.pf
■I !<
a Ma- Berlin prea* on the
!»■ n lior> e to read
I p H ||r< proposes to
pMbu'o /leal
Up
j I I
. ;
!» be
lp> ha had anything ft, de i
■ Un y hi ve ) re
h
It* a
■rr of going he
f
dt of
of as «
» he
Is n
Ip r
a!
1'ti
a t cn
ilormt th
ep<
apt pupil
»in al." but a
ure 1.
'trick a
no
•r:
j flu
perid
icnl.ifi«
irilng by an
quietly
m<
igti a B«
velop as far
thb
Bought to ti»*
in pi bio the faculties of
lia
examined by the cell
I'llillH ij
«■«tor oft Ip zo(»J
Studt
uni, by Mini:- h i
«'«Incut
s by km
nil leading
army, it has beei
als in tin
nr
J
J
'Hllgt «I
e th.
■ « this
•mp'Ti'i ^ ■' ii
•einnrkahlo pi rtorman«'«
i«*ntlfl<- coimniHsioM
lid
iSKUp
vill lie
posed,
v uppoinlcil
'oinposi'd u
doubt of expert
tu « 1 ** 11 1 s of animals
ill be avNaitvu
I ps\ «'ludouis
1
hos«' report
1 tense interest
a
! Osten ia well
ith in
It must 1
addl'd that this horse Is mil
on exhibition to the publie.
Herr von
«h», and avoid* publicity
j Only by special permission, «rented to n
sch'f't f«*w can the horsn b* afvn
The
«at the tuft band
*ckcK»ng tablet.
j luilla and number aclteme w«td In the
instruction
j picture
S?l
"ornci lb« 1 blackboard
\MORtV PATTEN
Noisy Modern Pleasures.
uout is s) uuuy
The
nums with enjoyment,
at 1er noon
■rati
• cveWng party really re
struggle between tin*
luces ilicit to ;
bum;
'out and a paid orchestra, as
hieb shall g«*t the better of the oth
Hu p.M- piring comlticur urges hi;
while the distracted
mu sts exchange confidential shrieks
to th«* impossibility of ''drowning that
to
er
mmdt'i.ms
of
.1
awlul band "
La«; les' Field
He Took the Civilized Method.
"Went into a t'h
• ■ restaurant labt
night. ' said the first ChirAtfonn
n>, t h « * way them
r H*»*
'Chopstlcka, eh?'" ?nid
an
Is
the
rus
"E
hiinamcn eat boiled
a
tup other.
Hid (hr> rxptvt you turftt it that WU
too?"
Times
"Yes, but civilizations
fur me l jest called fm
11 right " Catholic Standard
$oou enough
a knife ard
ac b
He Had One Experience.
», î
I
The f«
hypuchomiriac
I changing confidence«.
j "Wore you ever bedridden?" inquire
ef
one.
j "Yes.
j "When?"
| "Three years ago, during a cycloa*
j out In Kansas The wind blew my bed.
with moon it. a distance of seven milef
N. o. Times-IVmo
qdiod the other
do
the
It.
before it let up!"
erat
A Gentleman of Leisure.
Mrs. Casey—Where's your husband
worltla'?
Mrs. O'Flannigan—He ain't workln*;
he's on the polls fores.—Town Topics. '
might
Bridget Share, thin, it serves
A r e should haie felt tli' wathc"
>e put jure hand In It Judge
yt
of
its
like
befi
Doesn't Play Golf.
"What yer doin' now. Tommie?"
"Not'ir.l"
"Ain't yer workln'?''
"Nope."
"1 hoord yer was caddyin' at de goll
club?"
the
"So I is,"
"Well, »(n't dat work«#'?"
"No, l only carry do clubs, de othet
fellers does de work."—Yonkers States
man.
! CALL COCOANUT A FRUIT.
! '
Sc I;. uoininaM'd \,j the Agricultural
Department-— Number An
ilJy Imported.
Tb»
que * I■.
omualiy
;i ' fruit*' ha« l>e«rt >rtt >*] in
•»a '.'H-uanufH
•garth d a
J
! a r«. f)orf
by the ri
j though know
J ir«-nt
11 run
■'■pa : I r».« n» of agrlt ulnjr
u «;■> a nur. tin depart
« ri/o
«•tiara«
it a t
1 » r t h ay« i»» part;
! hi <*xreptkm of a few fiua-j
Inrh' worth grown annually in j
•oanubf are produced in j
> :.L*I ( nifF-d HiaP 1
! dr- d <1
I Flonrj
no
A tropical j
n almost exclusively on i.*»l- |
J fruit, ;:ruv.
I alld.s and i
I in« up<
>plcal
in tries br
der*
the -ea. there i-. little
Urri
dapt
, ,,
tory in r||. United Staten proper
, ' ll,iv »"" n - Th " 11
j * 3j * " f *
I
:*• «pian
mtinit;- and their products
i in this
practi
< »un try ur
My all imported.
With the acqulsitb
territory
r th* 4 «lo.se of the Spariiah-Ameri
of
1 !
j
j
Up iv a
into the
i>"- s '»••*'
i of tip United States a
Jtdh upon which » ocoanut produt -
! lion I« a considerable économie i„
,f '' I'MUppinea it not only plays
! Jrnpo«
iber of
lft
a« tor. j
an !
in the douipsilc
♦■cono- j
ru> (,
P'''d»lc. but the exportation
I
di b'«| meat
the
ie of the largest
nanut* j
dilute
toils >f
Made, returning
I I uejr expo»
; •'»' ^' iilpelago in,j»» $2,
to the
i.OOO to $4.»H)0.- j
In the »mail island of Tu- !
i
group, e»i
•xiw»rl. tipwar
i! of I
»ally I
" 1,1 :
o tons.
»ein« shipped O
un i
1" Borto Hie
tin area
»TO Hi!
'ling to
the c
f It
«* of these i>
Iocs the
» y Importa
a « y imports of romani
I'mm rn
cd
' u
now obtain a
uis and
heir products arc '
:
0
j flu
and as
■oariut j ,
f»Ht irnpor- !
Ir
O!
by f;
the
; is
I tant, a« measured bv valu«
nut n
rorn
istom
house
r «'« m.reiiin j>~
in the I*i
»•mied .ii
Stall
Up- ti
4 1
ulii' d at $'J.:»i!*.l J'j. !
» vi«':-.t imports of
d'* into th»* United
i v '
ions, high
an
vd-is:i.«
yy Ip n i Ii.- quantl
'onsumpiioM amount
has
t\ «1
■red for
■ I at $1,
IM.m
Th.
principal
to which
this oil is put in the. I niiml States is
in hi..
tic»
'itli other oils in th"
confectionery
food
manuf:»
rn< dit 1 1
■hire of snap, in »
il preparations.
• I
corn
pound!- f«T
and fr
I « 1 preparation of textiles
«.■'her purposes
"Next ii' importance to eoeoanut oil i
'ta ni
ere th
in th
•ocoanuts
Bhell of which the deliveries f.
RumpHon in
Amounted in
the quantifies
th«- fiscal year I pul*
nine to $908.226.
of »nits if
As 'I,
til" blii.ll im
port
a rough estiinnti
value of the
prl"" of
lnlo th" I'niO'd Stab's ranges from 1 ( 1 .
As i
ilflelal
TI«»
coord, but
ba«ed upon the total
Imports and the fivcraio*
» in nuts annually importe!
Pit!
veil known,
the l r nltod
v stale and in
—to
honi'
of
these
States rliiHly in
the manufacture
SHOWS SAVED BY MUSIC.
Reputations of Comedy Singers Are
Of to
Made by the Aid of
Good Orchestra.
Many
poor show i
hr«' be ausc of a good or« li«*stro
■«.I fi
fail
This.
Kuy* the Chi
-'«» Tribune.
prominent theatrical manager of the
city says Tin* worse a sin
what ;
Is the
more necessary is It that the men who
'it before (lie slam' and assist the per
formers to get through the piece should
he first-class musicians,
girls have
F»*w chorus
any Idea of what music
and harmony really is and hardly any
i»f them have good voices, ac.-ording to
this man.
In order that a musical f ?
through satisfactorily the
must lx* of
|)»' « may g«>
'hestra
character strong «*nough
to play the score properly and to i
the chorus
ing
wander
not for
ith its music covering
up th«' defects of the chorus many of
si cal corned >
be wonderful to listen to.
h.
it. begins to
from the right key.. If it were
the orchestra
the
'nsemhh.s would
"Th" best nrrhoatruR in this city ire
to he fourni in the smalt theaters <ie
veil'd to (lie musical comedy and bur
lesque." says lliis man, "This Is ex
tremely necessary. If
of cheap men to play for us here the
public would Ret to think that the
e had a lot
mil
■ily was a horrible thing in
It is next to impossible to get
I) member Is
an accomplished singer. Consequently
there are times when the efforts of the
musicians in the pit come as a Mess
ing not only to the slago manager, who
Is tearing his hair behind the
but also to the public out in front.
When the chorus get particularly had
the orchestra hears down strong, and
before long the chorus is swung back
Into the proper key. If the orchestra
good it would follow the cho
rus when It gets off the track and so
queer the whole show."
deed.
a full chorus wherein
scenes.
was
I
I
Coming to It.
After the judge had sentenced the col
ored prisoner he said;
"Kin I say one word, suh?"
"Yes; go ahead."
"Ef I starts in alt over ag'in en tells
do truth, will you take off two years
frum dat sentence?"
"Do you mean to say," said the judge,
sternly, "that you haven't been telling
the truth all the time?",
"Yes, suh; I was des projiekin"roun'
It. en sashayin' up ter it!"—Atlanta Con
stitution.
Church of Coral.
A church of solid coral is a curiosity
of the Isie of Mahe. This island, rising
8,000 feet, is the highest of the Sey
chelles group in the Indian ocean, and
its buildings are all from square blocks
hewn from massive coral and glistening
like white marble.
is
of
Parental.
'Teople who have their children
taken care of by nurses never know
the real joys of parenthood."
"Maybe not, but they don't lie
awake at night worrying about it."—
Chicago Record-Herald,
'fil« 6f H IM
t

THE YOUNG MEN IN POLITICS
HelERESTING GOSSIP OF THE BIG
EASTERN ÄFTROPOI.IS.
Sevairl Son« of Wealthy Houses Are
i
Dabbling i:
the Ga tie—Expense
of Choosing 0 :h''s Neigh
bor« in a City.
YORK — It
to bethought
that a rich mutt !
had no show in
■ diticH. Rut now
that
Urokcra, Murphy#,
MH'arrens and
Mcl^ughliu ! have
become rich in ,
by and through j
* «>litlc» the old
many
r .v
ffi
m
y
jibes against in
herited money do
•'go"
longer. Sum» in»« 1
cal political avii\
ting figures in lo
«H now are rich
might
Though he began !
and politics as a
lie ha« command
v.calth through hiH wife, a daugh
and well-bred young
number the
life ;
Y<
en.
eport*
$1.«
t< r of John G. Her' Her.
One of Mr McClellan's friends is j
Congi casrnau J .. • ; i -, Burton Ha;-j
s father was i
v .c private secretary [
as organiz
ing armJe.s to drive ihivis out oi Rich
J. IT
Vo
ci'io
»! McClellan's 1 .:ther
Mother is known its
u writer and in society. His wife is
t!v daughter oi a many-timec mil
ion a i re of the Pacific coast. No
local politics hi
month
man
future. Young aa
is, he lias been
I « nated for the lieutenant governor
a'
,
V rival oi Mr. Harrison in politic;
is iu's colleg i:liu;.;mate at Yale, Cor
nelius Vanderbilt, whose ''cutting fill Î
with n million" in his father's wi • ' j
such a stir, and who has dt - j
a nomination ior congress. Cor !
is the only one oi the young» :
» bills vho ha shown busin» : •
ability. He has a
'
inventor, and i;
inanci
the recent military
toilet as a
limitt nant in the dust.. Incidentally h -
a
'ked out by the heat, tor li j
has not inherited the iron
of the old commodore.
•th in Virginia
cons'it u
th"
• I March of .Trade on "The Avenue.''
HAT
Vanderbilts have
been doing re
cently is shown
in a humdrum
of real
on Fifth
the richer
oil i
/p
transi'
• state
avenue. Here tie
family are gradu
ally
plot after plot—
iu a region where
land sell* for
'I,
im
1 .
but
buying up
b'M
vi.
in
from $(;.HK> to $«,
000 per fri
—to control the ncigliborhood of their
honi' s. They have stopped the march
of trad« 1 up th
against Helen Gould's city
barrier and there
foot
jc. It
beats
.stays. The Hotel
th. Regis is above the dead line, but a
plac where you pay five dollars for
oue roast «luck is not classed with or
dinary hotels as a 'nuisance."
The most notable achievements in
ur of millions to prevent a nat
ural development have been thus far:
On; million paid by George Vander
bilt -to buy u cellar opposite his house,
on land that had cost $700,000 a few
months earlier, where lie feared that
a Hky-fccraper would Ik* erected.
William K. Vanderbilt paid $850,000
for three old dwellings opposite hi«
French renaissance chateau, again to
block a modern building.
Mr. Sloane, a Vanderbilt son-in-law,
has now paid nearly $2,000,000 for
three houses of better class
this
;
ill the
■ighborhood. Upon part, of the |
Morton F. Plan* |
" the great
Buion club house is another high
■upant, and two modern resi
Ram«'
land thus *'savpd
has erected a "show place;
n ei
class
ficncos built to fence off other things
still await an owner.
Th«» problem of having "good neigh
bors" is quite as vexatious in the city
ns In the country, and
None of these Vanderbilts ever spends
more than three weeks in the city. As
I before remarked. Cornelius is differ
ent.
costs more.
The "Simple Lifo" Man.
T
U A society thu3
occupied In wrap
ping Itself in cot
ton wool, a mes- !
from I
France I
S"
A
•sage comes
luxurious
telling of "The
Siraplo Life."
Charles Wagner
is one of those
. %s. (L ■
:)
7
Jk
men about whom
you hear a great
deal all at once
after he has been
growing in public
esteem for years
preacher in Paris
!
7 }
He is a Protestant
Once, when I was in York, England.
I had occasion to climb early
morning upon the top of a tramcar
filled with workmen. To one of thorn
I mentioned that 1 lived in Brook
in
one
lyn.
You know Dr. Talmage. then?" he
asked.
i do, extremely well,"
said the man, earnestly,
"you
every
practice what ha
"Then,
laying his hand upon my knee,
can teil me—I read his sermon
week -does he
j
\\ ugner uocs. He looks the peasant do
that he is. He is big and powerful ln I
build, with heavy shoulders, a broad !
face and a manner ot hearty slmpli-i
city. It is his theory that modem life
preaches?
is growing so cxrmpiex that hero!*
measures are necessary; that we must
ft hack to nature and natural ways I
of doing things, it is not a bad doc
trine for New York.
Wagner comes endorsed by John j
YVannamaker; he goes to visit Presi- j his
dent Roosevelt, another sturdy speci
men who enjoys a simple existence
Wheu he can.
I shall be surprised If there itosil us.
t
campten of "Muipl!' •• ,!i winter.
! have reasons, ou* of
the imminent is air* id*
in Ragland. h<.n- v,e
• ir*g done, upon «"Nul ■ >pit:;.. When it
bad (luring the London ue&sou
that there w*w m; time to do anythin»,
«ave »at and sleep \ chant;' was
bound to come. How abow theaters,
for Stance? To live, even in Lon
don. a theater must cioie at euch au
hour that ioor } eople rvhn are utces
bnçcMoü, a* ci 'vl
can grt to fif'd. bul
l'isi.ic«aible: who at
fi is ihr».:
well begun
ou.- UUttn
:
BIG got
Are ^ary to it«
i worl. nr-xt day.
liow about th"
ran««,
eight
long course dinner?
It ll " Set oui of the
r * ,at ■' N'-w Vor!; tret been aping tbeso ;
mutt ! Ialc »>■><«•*•
in 1 anotlu r sign. Comic opera? j
fresh in.m London satirize th' newest |
lad before* it appears. Th a y '-an, bc
e.aji-e the sanu* men make the fads
and the comb: opera.-;; men of brain«
that is to-day. Society people invent
nothing. The funniest thing on the
clock b'-giu an hour-ancl-a-balf-1
Now much fun 1
th rarer after 1
to
Is
now
have
in ,
j Kta M* to-day is a son*' and dance in
old "The Schoolgirl," where three clown*
sing about siinplk ii.v, and .utruduce
horseplay with tops, mechanical toys
and butterfly nets. You remember the
aesthetic
''Patience?''
in
do
D'Oyc-y Carle'i.
lo
rich
!
a
Tlie Harnefis Hor«?s.
AHN
racing
more
since
n
mat I
is j
i
[
the
[I
carded
the
shield, out j.
interest lias
Ä i
fly
»1.C
y !
«
with the record*
However, the sea
lasts longer
a.m
its
is
No
than it n ed, a
there Is talk tluc
Lou Dill on mu>
yet break record
The s l o w n ess
'« Ö) *
hi
8
9
'•vi'a which the s,
trotters have been whittled down of
late suggests the query whether sulky
Unie hasn't nearly reached the limit.
bicycle sulky with pneumatic
Ur .; and low scat knocked a few easy
oconds off the records made by horses
a' it equally good, but
nient; upon the pneuma
suggested, and the wind shield is dis
a-: introducing ;
ordr
id pacers at
is
out
the
Î
' j
- j
!
:

'The
improve
beer
!) 'is
the
•rediicd
unnatural
of
condition.
a
-
But consider: John R. Gentry paced
a mile as l mg
minute more tba
j
lShu in half s
tli" "
met
Up

lias
and
r ,
and
sive
did tie sum
: ocr low*
"red the record to
Alix trotted a mile ;n
>!) and a
years
ago, and the record dropped only
second ami a quarter iu nine
The wind shield brought three
and three trotters within the
. '.I
uto class, but that, lit .■ Rip Van \V?i.
Ule's drink, "don't count.
then
Fraction 1 1, y
; minute was knocked off the tro -
ting time iu a ♦century; if only on
.second and i
last ten years of that time the process
is slowing up.
of
that
Utiartcf was lost in tir
Consider how. in the same
years, bicycle records have dropped by
fractions, not of second», but
to;;
if mil
utes. without essentia!
improvement
in th«' make of
come whi n ik will take wheelmen
■ heals. The tip; may
ten
Years to squeeze out a second or sc
loss of time at. Up* mile,
member Hoben Bonn»*r wisely specu
lating
would ever catch the hor?e
distance.
hot lie
tnc man
i he wucel
at that
distance.
a
for
or
in
hi«
to
for
The Shipbuilding Suits.
b'CH
centered in the
suits against the
shipbuilding trust.
Th«* fact that
pvTor people wen
bitten in this steal
does not lessen
interest, for
waa the crowning
outrage of "over
capitalization."
Senator Smith,
of New Jerse:
th»* receiver.
y
intêrest
h*» Ï:
no
A

{HOUND
fl.reD
.
I r e
it
f'!i
[\
| been selling the
| There were
has
plants one by om
eight., besides SchwabV
Beihlehem steel works,
of the eight brought
trifle over $700,000.
been capitalized at some $07.000,000.
Never was » teal
The first fou»
at auction r»
The trr.&t had
more 'audacious
could advertise It
Poor Leroy Dresser we*
Nothing that
lost sight of.
brought in because he was
a brother
in-law of George Vanderbilt, and that
pave the conspirators
whisper the Vanderbilt name
Nixon, the cleverest ship designer In
the country, perhaps, but no fini
was exploited. It was nearly the ruin
of both these men. "Jim" Hill wm
building his great ships at. m
eight yards, paying for the
the yard wasn't
a chance in
■ icr
! >' in 'se!f because.
I 8tr ong enough to take
I tract; hut that arrangement was
coaled,
ic of th
mater!?,!
so g»- it a «;on
con
The personnel of the trust's victim?
adds interest. One of the largest auf
ferers liereabouts was 0
. Odell, a
shrewd citizen, hardly the kind on«
would expect to sec caught with chaff
Another victim was the widow of Fer
nando Wood, the war-time Tammany
mayor of New York. Still another
was Charles II Kavanaugh, a knit
goods manufacturer up-state It is h's
suit that is to be tried.
''High finance" is queer Here ha*
been worse than highway robbery, and
no one suggests that anyone be put
in jail. Kavanaugh's action is a suit
against the former directors of the
Trust Company of the Republic, Dres
ser's company, which financed the
deal, to compel them to pay into the
trust treasury the amount Its stock
depreciated through their monkeying
with the trust.
is
Tt somehow do ret round complicated
j Rot perhaps that Is the best they
do at present,
I
!
can
OWEN r. A NOTION
Betört Courteous.
At à dinner party in Avondale the
other evening a callow vouth found
himself seated between two young ms»
I who own a merchant tailoring estab
iishmem
" 1 -aw—have been placed between
j two—aw—tailors, it seems " remark 'd
j his dudelets.
Y»s." replied one of the.
voting
men, "and at the present stago of th,
game we have only one gxzose betweer
us. "--Cincinnati Ksquirer.
it
p
\ .
u
!
MEN WHO ARE DIRECTING THE ;
I
WELL KNOWN IN CAPITAL
'
jUpr
• il n U
fl
l/l
J
i
POLITICAL CONTESTS.
Wa îhington Has a New Interest in
the Battle for the Presidency
—Seuator Gorman as
a Leader
;
j
|
1
1
Washington.—President Roosevelt is
back in Washington to stay. He will
male a Hjing trip
to Oyster Ray th»
day be!ere election
in November, will
vote the straight
republican ticket
early in the morn
ing and return to
Washington elec
tion day afternoon
in order to be in the
executive office
when the return."
come in at night.
The p r e « i d ent's
pretence in Wash
ington has a stimulating effect on the i
ii.- the capital. What has been a|
er,; , \ village in point of energy ana
iife has now been transformed into a
•«tv. .Strangers are visiting
Mon in larger numbers and the
. ii.-e is again tile Mecca ior poli
tician: ;nd statesmen.
W. .i the president tal es a deep iu
ü tiie campaign it cannot be said
that lie i. in any way directing it. That
work *: been turned over to other
- Mr. Roosevelt is surveying the
: the viewpoint of an ordinary
fitixt u. 'i is the impression he gives
w no see him. He is ready to djs
outlook, but, like most citizens,
fine as to what the real workers
the field are doing, 'ike fact is
ident has very little time to de
. in addition
to the routine business of his office, he
Is petting material together for his an
nua! message to congress.
j®'*r- <!
is
of
the
»,
wm
M
l
Roosevelt.
f'f esj
rest
hi
fleh
is ii
out in
the pr
vote I«) politics just now.
It is a compendium of
record for the past | ar,(
This annual message is a formidable
umlert
mg.
rn nient'a
the g<
eks and months past bureau
chiefs hav" been busy collecting the data
of * hirer offices for submission to the i
'ica«':- of their departments, and the cab- ' mea
oiketim? j 1,2
met » ifficer;., in turn have be
Up e bureau reports, studying them, and
• cm will complete their digests of what
lias been going on in their departments
and rub mit them to the president. The
r , f • ident goes over all these department
and bureau reports, gets a comprehen
sive view of n'l that has been done and
now
the
the
then advises congress in a set message
of the progress that has been made, the j is
problems that have been solved, the dif- after
Acuities that have arisen, the policies j
that have been followed during the past
r and :• ragest* wherein congress may
provide tr • ;ul legislation for future gov
is
ment
was,
that
crnrn"nt.
Cortelyou as Manager.
Wh ile tl." president is not. running the
campaign there are other men taking
care of hi h inter
Wlicn he se- |
ii Secretary of
ten
sc
Oft?
Commerce ami La
bor Ccrteh ou to u«:
chairman of the ra
tional committee
and thus I» • his p er
re presenta
tive in the political
contest, there was
no end of criticism,
grumbling and pre
diction of disaster
and blunder on the part of politicians
who believed that uo man, not trained iu
t he pract ai school oi politics, should be
selected
/
4',^- :
;
sonal
m
direct the campaign. Mr.
Cortelyou''. experience hail been in t.lie
line of routine government work and
later of executive experience, but he
was not hollered to har e any knowledge ;
or appreciation of what is known as 1
"practical politics." I
it
President Roosevelt bad bis owu idea,
however, ci the kind of man he Acntei. !
tu run t he campaign. He believes utor- t
uuvhl.v in political orgar.izaticu and I a
g Cortelyon's genius fur organ- I of
ixation in government work lie roio ; as
cluiud the same quality would he val- 1
uable in a political campaign. I
Chairman Cortelyou has nut älsap- T
pointed the president, buf h» has disap
I.n to. "! bi ' < rittc-s within his own party,
The Old line politicians take their hats : "
off tothiajomif, general who has broucht I
Into politics the genius and ability that ! p ;'
prov. -i so effective hi conducting a rov- | 0t
ernrain, department. Even his poHüea! f V
opponenm express admiration for Mr.
Coi tel.ura's quiet and effective method f "
of managing a campaign. The visitors
at the republican headquarters in New
York and Chicago arc ail struck with
the business air that Characterizes them.
The whole force works with the system
and efficiency of a well organized busi
ness house, all of which is the result
of Mr. Cortelyou'« methods.
The young chairman has not forgot
ten the few lessons he learned in prac
tical politics, of which the public had
no general knowledge. Ho had a close
association with the late national chair
man. Ilr ma, and his address and tact
are now being used effectively persuad
ing those interested in republican
cess to open their poeltctbooka.

kuov.-i
city
have
into
or
Cars.
rule
cars
itate
as
the
held
ing
test
Ciow
H110
The Democratic Managers.
The dl moerats also have a well organ
ized national headquarters, hut it
qui red s
time to get them
into smooth
ning order. To aid
in this they secured
the services of Sen
ator Arthur Pne
Gorman of Mary
land. a past, master
In polities
statescratt,
Washington is
particularly inter
ested in the cam
paign now that
two of its well
known citizens arc pitted against each
other in directing the republican and
democratic campaigns. Mr. Cortelyou
has been a resident of the District for
some 12 years, while Senator Gorman
is looked on as one of the old inhab
itants. He has had a home in Washing
ton for a generation and spends his win
ters here with his family and his
re
lOnger
hat
heart.
though
you.
Stories.
ruu
III
\V
■-I
and
Senator uomiar..
Mrs
think
w
Mrs.
him
kin's
and
him
sum«
Biers »I his farm at Laurel, Uarjusd
. only au Lour'., ruu out ot the cit,
l ev, pub ic men are better known at
! the capital than Mr. Gorman. amt p lt
ate to say lew are more respected n,
; lias thousands of acquaintances her»
now who are particularly interested 1U
•he campaign because they believe that
I Mr. Gorman is one of the actual, if not
not lhe ^tuiar, he*» *>» the natioun
democratic committee. He is as luip.r
' turable as Mr. Cortelyou, is diplomatic
and tactful and back of all this basa lit»
time's experience of the ins and outs of
polities. He is expected to turn many
a truth that will keep the other side
Boosting, but he is too shrewd to advance
any opinion or make any prediction be
yond the general statement that with
harmony and hard work there is «
chance to w in the election.
i
Cupid in the Army,
it is a serious question with the mili
tary authorities whether there should
__next be
some int>ci
fieation of the rules
regarding
rnents in the regc
iar array. Tirant e
regarding lira au
miasion of married
men Into th« ranks,
it is contended by
some of the author
ities, might well b»
abrogated,
least modified.
There is now severe
punishment meted
out to a man who
conceals the tact
that he is married when he enlists iu the
army. It has been suggested that the
punishment under these circumstances
is out of proportion to the infraction
of army rules and it is proposed to re
duce the punishment so as to retain de
sirable men iu the service, notwith
standing the fact that they are mar
ried. Many army.officers contend that
the best soldiers are. often those who
have wives to look after them
provide for.
enli;?t

I
or at
i's Bar for
'urdd
or io
The principal objection to married
soldiers is that in the transfer of troop*
involving travel beyond the seas and
long periods of absence from home sta
tions the soldier with a wife become*
somewhat of an impediment. The wives
sometimes give trouble and if husband
ar,( ^ w ^ e are separated there is dissat
isfaction and occasionally a desertion.
This objection, however, ia believed
offset by t h* better character of the
mea who are married. They arc apt to
1,2 steadier and mure attentive to their
duties.
to
The authorities have encountered
some difficulty in getting the best ma
terial into the ranks of the army. Ju&t
now the navy seems to have the call. f,s
the life there is more attractive and the
opportunity greater for seeing more of
the world. Army life in time of peace
men
is rather monotonous and joung
after the present short enlistment of
three years do not care to reinlist. There
is a suggestion that the term of enlist
ment be extended to what it formerly
was, that is, live years. It was thought
that the privilege of rising from the
ranks ami receiving commissions would
inducement to intelligent young
men to enter the army. This is not
found to be the case, however, and the
only explanation that seems to offer is
that there are better opportunities in
be
the laI,t)r ilu »> business world for strong.
healthy and intelligent young men.
u«:
iu
Negroes of Washington.
The sociologist who wants to study
the race question might camp down here
*-—_ in Washington and
-aJ have at easy range
all types and
classes of the col
ored race for his in
vestigation. There
. is represented in
90.000 colored pop
ulation of the cap
ital city every de
j gree of excellence
and evil in the
& negro from the
raillicnaire, e d u
** rated colored man
down to the mo3t
u
t |M
fro
m
M
;
1
I
:/ 1/
( J
Of tlu* Und«8irabi
Class.
brutal type of the
! neKro äesenerate. The colored popula
t ," of thls cit '' is to » great extent
I a barom0ter that reflects the eentiment
I of Ule race th roughout the country. The
; as P! rili : on °f Id'" better classcn as typi
1 fled in lhp Booker Washington move
I "'M is redected in the upper crust of
T olo /f. Washington. The
brl1 aI lnf!tlll cts that lead to the horrible
«"«•*" »""e retribution usually comes
: " the . fo ™ f ,y,ichm 8 are observable
I ^ loW6r M a ra!a ot «*<*
! p ;' pMl f, tlon ' , " e ' Ma » or Sylvester, chief
| 0t , 1 p0,ice ' dec,are f. » 'he idle and
f V " " eK T? w .f c fr( ' m Wash '
'"»»to 11 y 113 <>lt > ""•'^^toemostpeace
f " ,he WOr,d '
Just now the colored people in this
city are very much worked up over the
"Jim Crow Car" proposition. The ad
joining states of Virginia and Maryland
have laws in operation that compel the
segregation of the negroes and put them
into cars that are known by that more
or less euphonious term, "Jim Crow
Cars.
The Wasliington negro is
rule very assertive, and as there are no
federal laws regarding his place on street
cars and railroad oars he does not hes
itate to push himself, sometimes offen
sively, among the whites, but
as he gets out of the district he is
ceremoniously rhucked into a car by
himself, This is very humiliating a«'l
the colored people of the district have
held meetings with the purpose of iorm
ing some sort of an organization to con
test the constitutionality of thcEe Jtra
Ciow laws. So far the meetings h*vs
resulted In nothing but talk.
a 'i
as soon
un
Always Tell the Truth.
Father—I hear, my boy, that you
hat e lately told your mother several
falsehoods. This grieves mo to tha
heart. Always tell the truth,
though it may bring BUffci'inr upon
you. Will you promise me?
Boy—Yes, father.
"Very well. Now go and se» tvho is
knocking at the door. If it's the rata
collector, say I'm not at höre."-- Stray
Stories.
even
A Black Sheep
Mrs Highmind—It worries me sick to
think how my little hoy is growing up
w ithout a taste for literature
Friend—Hasn't he any?
Mrs. Highmind—Not a bit. I bought
him a beautifully bound copy of Rus
kin's "Seven Lamps of Architecture,"
and I actually had to whip him to make
him read it.— N. Y. Weekly.

xml | txt