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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, September 24, 1909, Image 6

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The Commonwealth
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
CKF.EN'WOOD : MISSISSIPPI
It does not hurt to hope that the
cost of living will be reduced.
Too many a summer elopement
winds up In an autumn divorce court.
Some of the summer romances do
not end as happily as the designers
of them expected.
Such of the crops as were waiting
for rain may now proceed with their
unfinished business.
age
Peary
only,
any
The airship man declines to be
called a chauffeur. He claims to be
a professor of aviation.
That "Swimmer who failed to swim
the English channel after the seventh
trial should get an airship.
One nice thing about Minister Wu
was the fact that it was almost impos
sible to misspell his name.
pole
U.
R.
New
less.
may
story
stall
a
actly
of
er
at
left
There is always so much trouble
about moving the crops that the farm
ers ought to put casters on them.
Sweden has added its name to the
long list of foreign lands that are hav
ing a heap of trouble this summer.
One of the best signs of good times
Is the activity in the repair shops of
the railroads. Talk of another car
ßhorPage is about due.
The African Diamond Trust has put
up prices. Here is where the heart
less monopolies take advantage again
of Hie; necessity of the poor.
The fool who rocks the boat has
not been heard from frequently this
summer, but victims of carelessness
have increased to a lamentable extent.
It's a windy day when no one beat3
the record wuth an aeroplane. The
aeroplane and the art of managing
it are undergoing steady improve
ment.
Labor troubles in this country are
mot numerous at the present time, and
there would be fewer of them were it
not for the professional agitators who
make it a business, to stir up these
troubles.
The Connecticut angler who has
met with great success through sink
ing a large bottle full of live bait, and
fishing alongside the glass prison for
the hungry big fish that become an
gered by bumping their noses against
It, has given a fresh excuse for includ
ing the bottle in fishing outfits.
Now that Minister Wu Ting Fang is
returning to China again, they are
tilling stories about him.
Here Is
A few years ago, in New York,
one:
he w f as met by a Tammany politician.
"What is your Christian name, sir?"
the politician asked. At once the dip
lomat's oriental calm stiffened into
dignity. "My surname is Wu."
A decree has been published in
Spain suppressing the privilege of
purchase of immunity from military
service. All will now have to serve
In the army, rich and poor alike. This
is first fruit of the popular uprising
and is encouraging, as it shows that
the Spanish government is willing to
listen to the voice of the people.
L3
An unusual example of loyalty is
given by the petition of a woman in
Seattle for divorce because her Eng
lish husband will not allow her to
shoot off firecrackers and display the
American flag on the Fourth of July.
She should, however, assert her inde
pendence in a better way by defying
her marital tyrant and patriotically
shooting off the fireworks anyway.
If you have an idea it is hot and
humid, read this news item: A bal
loon which made an ascension from
St. Louis landed in Illinois after sail
ing all night through cold rain and
sleet and through a heavy snowstorm
for about an hour. Is not this sugges
tive of the coming time when it will
be possible, with the aid of flying ma
chines, to find any sort of climatic
coalitions desired?
Naval officers in Charlestown have
warrant for being incensed at the ac
tion of a Boston judge, who gave a
youth brought before him the alterna
tive of enlisting in the navy or going
to jail, says the Baltimore American.
Navy service is an honorable one, and
the stand taken that it lowers it in the
eyes of the public to attempt to make
it of a reformatory character for em
bryo criminals is one which popular
opinion should not approve.
The killing of three German bal
loonists by Russian guards on the bor
ders of the czar's dominions gives the
common practice of shooting at aero
nauts the dignity of a serious interna
tional question. It is time that some
thing were done to impress upon the
people of all nations and of all parts
of naUons, the fact that shooting at
balloons is something that cannot be
done without assuming the risk of
murder and the punishment therefor.
A test case is to be made in the
New York courts as to what criminal
statute is violated by tl*e offense
technically known as "talking back"
to the police, and whether arrest and
punishment in the matter are justified
by the law. The question of illegal
arrest is really a serious one, as the
whole matter of personal liberty, up
on w'hich the principles of this gov
ernment are founded, is involved. And
It may be remarked that the metropo
lis is not the only city in the country
In which official dignity has an un
.written law of its own.
When the disaffected of other lands
are minded to continue here their
disaffection and to rail and agitate
and conspire against Republicanism,
just as they had done against mon- i
archism, says the New York Tribune
we must regard their coming as an
impertinent and offensive intrusion,
which is permitted, if at all, not be
cause of may legal or moral right of
theirs, but through a carelessness or
a self-confidence on our part which
mark# mere com placement than are
geftt or patriotic.
est
'
I
■•ijèk. W.
urn
mm
.., 1 „
iÉjtlÉiËÉi
HOW PEÀRY FOUND NORTH POLE
Intrepid Explorer Tells About His Successful Dash to the
Apex of the world*
IMPORTANT
TO PUBLISHERS.
The following preliminary account-by
Commander of hj s successful voy
age to north pole
September 8 by the New York Times
Company at the request of Commander
Peary and for his protection, as a book
only, copyrighted and exposed for sale
before any part of it was reproduced by
any newspaper in the Chited States or
Europe, ip order to obtain the full pro
tection of the copyright laws. The repro
duction of this
without permission,
penalties for violation of this form *t>f
copyright include imprisonment for ftny
person aiding or abetting such violation.
Copyright, 1909, by the New York Titties
Company.
was issued on
account, In any form,
is forbidden. The
Report on the distovèry bf thë north
pole by Rbbért E. Peary, commander
U. S. N., copyright, 1909, by Charles
R. Miller, as vice-president of the
New York Times Company.
Battle Harbor, Labrador, via Wire
less. Capt. Ray, N. F.—As it
may be impossible to get my full
story through in time for to-morrow's
paper, partly as a prelude which may
stimulate interest and partly to fore
stall possible leaks, 1 am sending you
a brief summary of my voyage to the
north pole, which is to be printed ex
actly as written.
Summary of north polar expedition
of the Peary Arctic club: The steam
er Roosevelt left New York on July 6,
1&O0; left Sydney on July 17; arrived
at Cape York, Greenland, August 1;
left Etah, Greenland, August 8; ar
rived Cape Sheridan at Grant Land,
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Miss Mary Peary, with Her Eskimo Dogs.
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1
Robert E. Peary, Jr.
September 1; wintered at Cape
Sheridan.
Leave on Sledges February 14.
The siedge expedition left the
Roosevelt February 15, 1909,
started for the north.
Cape Columbia on March 1; passed
British Record, March 2 ; delay by
and
Arrived at
HAILS REIGN OF THE OYSTER
Writer Evidently Is a True and Con
sistent Adorer of the Luseious
Bivalve.
Hail the beginning of that pleasing
garland of months which contain the
Ha!
Do you feel the
R.'
letter
thrill? Does your mouth begin to wa
ter? Can you not discern your gas
tronomic familiar spirit leading you
away, sated and cloyed, from canta
On Ice En Route
The driver of the ice wagon was
preparing to execute one of his choic
est stunts in turning cornera when he
was haldted by a piercing feminine
shriek: *
I "Iceman, oh, iceman!" >
He stopped with less grace than he
had advanced. A woman approached.
"Do yon go up to One Hundred and.'
Fifth street," she asked, "and do you
deliver Ice a* my 'housed" She gave
A
open water, March 2 and 3; held up
by open water, March 4 to 11; crossed
the eighty-fourth parallel, March 111
encountered opefi lead» MâHffl iö;
crossed éightÿ-flftfa paräiiel» March
11» efbssed eighty-sixtli parallel,
Mârëh 23 ; eücouiitefed opefi lead,
March 23; passed Norwegian fteCörd,
March 23; passed Italian Record,
March 24; encountered open lead,
March 26; crossed eighty-seventh
parallel, March 27; passed American
Record, Marêh 28; encduhtërefl open
lead, March 28; held up fay open wa
tet; March 29; crossed eighty-eighth
parallel» April 3; Crossed eighty-ninth
parallel, April 4; north pole, April 6.
All feCurnihg left north pole April
7» reached Cape Coiümbià Âpfii 23,
arriving on bdàrd Roosfevelt April 27.
The Roosevelt left Cape Sheridan
July 18; passed Cape Sabine August
8; left Cape York August 26; arrived
at Indian Harbor with all members of
expedition returning in good health
except Prof. Ross G. Marvin, drowned
April 10, when 45 miles north öf Cape
Columbia, returning from 80 degrees
north latitude itt command bf the
supporting party.
ftÔBEftf È. PEAftV.
AS Seen by"scientist
BY CYRUS C. ADAMS.
(Member of American Geographical So
ciety.)
(Copyright, 1909, by New York Times.)
New' York.—(Special.)—The fore
going dispatch, though conden
sed, tells clearly the leading fäCtä
iö the Story, hot only of Peary's jduf
Mrs. Robert Ë. Peary,
ney to the north pole, but also of a
remarkably fast sledge trip over the
ice of the open polar sea.
The dispatch says that the Roose
velt passed the winter of 1908-1909 at
Cape Sheridan, on the coast of Grant
Land. The vessel had threaded the
comparatively narrow channels, sev
eral hundreds of miles in length, lead
ing from Cape Sabine to the Arctic
ocean.
This journey is apt to be difficult
and sometimes impossible, but the
conditions were evidently favorable.
The ship that disappeared in the fog
while the crew of Peary's auxiliary
steamer Erik w r ere watching its de
parture from Etah made a good pas
sage through the long channels, and
arrived safely on the shores of the
sea, where the explorer was to start
on his sledges for the north pole.
But at Cape Sheridan Peary was not
as far west as he probably had hoped
to be. He had announced his inten
tion, in the previous year, of making
his sledge route to the pole along
some meridian much further to the
west of his route in 1906, when he
made the highest north attained up
to that timi
-87 d. 6 m.
On that occasion he w r as greatly im
peded by the rapid drift of the ice to
the east which a little retarded his
progress north, and worse still, car
ried him so far to the east that he had
to make his landing on the coast of
North Greenland, many days' march
from the Roosevelt, his base of sup
plies.
On his expedition of 1905-06 he tried
loupes, roasting ears, watermelons
and clams and beckoning you toward
the throne of the undisputed monarch
of bivalves, the luscious and lovely
oyster? For eight months his benig
nant reign will be over us, gentle,
soothing and sustaining. Waste no
time in swearing your allegiance to
this sovereign of the land of Cock
aigne, who is ready at all hours to die
for you. Seek not to find fault with
his. disguises, which multiply with the
years. Receive him whether he comes
to you on the half-shell, fried, stewed,
her name and address. The ice man
said that number was on his route
and that he was due there in about
half an hour.
"Oh, I am so glad," she said. "Will
you take these things up for me?
There are a steak, a salad, a quart of
mint and some ice cream. I started
to carry them home myself, but 1 have
to stop at several places- on the way
end it is sp hot the things won't he
mm
Mm
. t
hard to force the Roosevelt a good di.
tance to the west of Cape Sheridan,
but the lee baffled hlffi. Ft» one re*
son 8r another on thé edge df- the ar&
tië wifater iast year he did not df Could
not take his vessel alohg the öörthern
coast of Grant Land td thé west df Cape
Sheridan» äh(l sb it spént last winter
ndt so fat froid its bid berth ifi the
ice m the winter of 1905-0;
The sledge expedition left the Roosë
velt bti February 13» While it waS
stili prafeticaiy dark in that latitude;
The Sun scarèfelÿ begins td peër above
the hills for ä few inihutes â day*
even several hundred miles tb the
south of the coast wheré the ftëosë;
velt was wintering. It comes ihtë
view a iittle iater in thât more florth
ern latitude and the party made slow
time to the west as it felt its way
along.
The northern Grant Land coast is
likely to be exceedingly difficult to
traverse, especially in the early spring
on account of the masses of sea ice
that haVe been pressed On the shore
of broken into great blöcks and
stranded along the sea edge.
It is no wonder that it töök the par«
ty 15 days to travel westward as far
as Cape Columbia. It is likely, how
ever, that Commander Peary succeed
ed, before winter' set in, in cachelng
supplies to the westward so as to ac
celerate a little the westward move
ment of the sledge party before it
struck out northward over the sea.
Arriving at Cape Columbia on
March 16 the sledges turned to the
north on the sea ice. The explorer had
laid touch stress upon the fact that he
intended to travel much further to the
west than on his trip in 1906. His dis
patch shows, however, that he did
not take to the sea any farther to the
west than he did on his earlier trip.
Commander Peary says nothing in
his report of being detained by pres
sure ridges or hummocks, and it is
certain that he met with no impedi
ment of this sort such as made his at
tempt to reach the pole in 1902 a con
tinuous and terrible strugggle.
A great obstacle and the one that
undoubtedly prevented him from
reaching the pole in 1906 was the wide
water lanes or leads of water, some
of them so long that he could not get
around them.
Peary's summary seems to show
that he was a little over thirty-five
days on the journey from the land to
the north pole. In this time he was
delayed about fourteen days by water
leads, leaving a little more than three
weeks for the actual sledging work.
6.
of
PEARY'S 28-YEAR REC
ORD OF ARCTIC EX
PLORATION.
I
1831—Entered navy as civil engineer
and began extensive study of arc
tic exploration.
1886—Applied for leave of absence to
visit Greenland,
months in interior of Greenland
and upon return announced cer
tain conclusions in regard to the
topography which received much
favor with scientific bodies.
Spent several
1891-92—Under auspices of Academy
of Natural Sciences of Philadel
phia he went to Greenland on
steam whaler Kite to attempt lo
cation of northern terminus of
Greenland. Accompanied by his
wife. Found and named Inde
pendence bay, 81 degrees 37 min
utes north latitude. Determined
insularity of Greenland, for which
he received medals of world's
scientific societies. Discovered
and named Melville land and
Heilprin land.
a
the
at
the
sev
the
fog
de
pas
and
the
1893-95—On this, third trip, he discov
ered famous Iron mountain, heard
of previously through Ross in
1818.
Mountain proved to be
three meteorites, one weighing
90 tons, largest on record. Daugh
ter Mary born to Mrs. Peary on
this voyage.
1896— Made short summer voyage to
Greenland.
1897— Made short trip to Cape York
to bring back meteorites.
not
the
he
1898-1902—Four-year exploration trip
under auspices of Peary Arctic
club, during which he rounded
northern extremity of Greenland,
archipelago, the most northerly
land in the world, 83 degrees 89
latitude,
up
north
minutes
named the cape after Morris K.
Jesup.
minutes north latitude.
and
im
to
his
car
had
of
sup
Attained 84 degrees 17
1905-06—Made dash for the pole and
established new "farthest north,
87 degrees six minutes north lati
tude.
1908-09—Reached the north pole on
April 6, 1909.
ri
no
to
die
with
the
scalloped, broiled, roasted or con
cealed within the flaky walls of a
juicy pie or the interior of a Thanks
giving turkey. Open wide your arms
—and, for that matter, your mouth—
and take him lovingly in. Watch
your calendar and improve each of
the royal months as it flies until flow
ery May, dreariest to the bivalvular
devotee, comes to wipe away the tears
of weeping April, sorrowing beeause
with her departure disappears that
true friend of mankind, the succulent
oyster.
fit to eat by the time I get home with
them, so if you will just put them on
ice to keep cool and send them xp on
the dumb waiter to my flat I will be
much obliged." And she handed up
the parcels.
"Well, I'll be ——" said' the ice max.
"Has It come to this?" And then, be
ing too much surprised to refuse his
strange commission, he accepted the
parcels and. deposited them carefully
on the most convenient chunk Of ica
—Chicago Inter-Ocean.
man
me?
of
have
way
he
art
EXCEPT or ATLANTIC STATES
SMALL.
lEatttred êf Saif I
Lost— Crop Will
Soon Be Gathered.
in
the
Everything fini
Matured Bolls
di.
re*
ar&
Could
Cape
winter
the
Roosë
waS
above
day*
the
ftëosë;
ihtë
florth
slow
way
is
to
spring
ice
shore
and
par«
far
how
ac
move
it
on
the
had
he
the
dis
did
the
trip.
in
pres
it is
impedi
at
con
that
from
wide
some
get
show
to
was
water
three
Memphis, Tenn .-^Cotton opened very
rapidiy-dthring the* week throughout the
South. Except in -the Atlantic states,
where there Atk some good crops, the
yield from the fields that have been
picked Over is not satisfactory, and the
indicated total out-turn is small. Crop
estimates are, therefore, small. Except
on lowlands the plant is not growing
now, and rains would aid but little to
the production. *
There 1§ much less complaint of shed
ding, hut it is notate that the
plaints have ceased where the loss has
been severest, and some correspondents
noted that the plant has lost every
thing biit itttitured or half-matured boils.
in Texas it is estimated that with fa
vorable weather the crop will be nearly
all gathered by Oct. 15, East of the
Mississippi river numerous showers fell
during the week, and Arkansas also got
some rain. These showers helped to
stem shedding and retarded slight the
rate'at which the bolls were opening.
com
in
is
THOUSANDS SEE HEROINE DIE
17-Ÿear-Old Girl Drowned While
Rescuing Companions.
Pittsburg.—Twelve shrieking,, panic
stricken children just before sundown
were swept in a rowboat over the raging
dam that stems the Monongahela river
at Eighteenth street, thjs city. Thou
sands of citize'ns on the' river ' banks
watched, horror-stricken, a heroine's fu
tile efforts to stem the slow movement
of the cockleshell to where a frothing
eddy marked the 25-foot drop of the
river over the government dam.
Decelia Roach, a 17-year-old girl, tem
porarily stemmed the boat's onrush to
destruction, and though lier heroism and
presence of mind enabled the rescue of
ten of the young children, she went over
the dam to death, and with her a 13
year-old child, who lay fainting on the
boat's bottom.
The sight of Cecelia Roach calmly tug
ging at the oars in the river, while one
by one the precious freight of children
was snatched to the safety of other
skiffs, caused the cheers of thousands to
end in drw^'sobs as she went with the
skiff to the rapids bejow. ft was a mag
nificent example of heroism.
HARR1MAN IS LAID TO REST
Heads of Estate Take Chief Part in
the Funeral.
Arden, N. Y.—Through the quiet aisles
of the Ramapo Woods the body of Ed
ward H. Harri man tvas carried Sunday
front the great house lie never lived to
see finished and laid in its last resting
place on the Arden hillside. The rulers
of Wall street came from New' York
to pay their last tribute, but the most
prominent part in the funeral cere
monies was taken by the mert who knew
him best as a country squire, master of
the great estate, -which .covers 43,000
acres of hill and valley in this most rug
ged part of rugged Ofa'if^é' county.
His general superintendent, his master
carpenter, his master mason and ' the
managers and assistant m'anagèf's of his
dairies, his farms and his trotting sta
bles, were the men who l>ore his coffin,
and the services ..were; led by his own
chaplain. . .. - /■
The pipes and oaks that surround the
little Episcopal Church of.. St. John's,
half a mile, up the.hill from .the Arden
railway station, never before sheltered
suck a distinguished gathering as stood
bareheaded under tTie shade by the grave.
The funeral was priate, and only those
who had received invitations from Mrs.
Harriman were admitted.
engineer
arc
to
cer
the
much
several
Philadel
on
lo
of
his
Inde
min
which
world's
and
discov
heard
in
PEARY WANTS JOINT DEBATE
be
weighing
Daugh
on
Will Issue Detailed Statement Ridi
culing Cook's'Story.
Sydney, N. 'S. —Commander Robert E.
Peary, who is returning to the' United
States "with the pole," will challenge Dr.
Frederick A. Cook to an open debate if
Cook does not at onec withdraw his
claims of having discovered the pole
first.
to
York
trip
Arctic
rounded
northerly
89
On his arrival here Commander Peary
will also issue a detailed statement ridi
culing Cook's story.
According to a close associate of the
returning explorer, Peary will assert
that Dr. Cook knew of Peary's success
before announcing to the world that he
(Cook) had reached the "big nail.'
Cook is said to have obtained the news
from Eskimos who drifted south from
Columbia, whereupon the Brooklyn phy
sician. it is asserted, dashed south with
all speed and succeeded in .proclaiming his
discovery, just a few days before Peary
flashed his success through the wire
less station at Indian Harbor.
K.
and
Dr.
17
and
north,
lati
on
ri
Foreigners Good, Farmers.
New Orleans, La.—Charles F. Allen,
special agent of the United ^States im
migration department, who'ha? tome to
Louisiana to make an investigation of
the foreign agricultural settlers in this
state, declares tha't much progress has
been made by this class of immigrants in
this section,
found, as a rule, that the foreigners
whether Italians, Bohemians, Germans or
Poles, are making a success as farmers
or truck growers, and that they are
working hard and saving.
con
of a
Thanks
arms
mouth—
Watch
of
flow
tears
beeause
that
succulent
He states that he has
$100,000,000 Cotton Deal.
Galveston, Tex.—John C. Albritton,
representative of the Fanners' Union oi
Texas and Oklahoma.. has made a con-,
tract with. Galveston bankers and cotton
factors to handle through this port the
cotton of union' members, which en»-.
braces many thousand farmers who raise
and ship the most of the cotton of the'
two states mentioned. The value of the
'cotton to be consigned to Galveston hj
tx* closer to $100,000,
with
on
xp on
be
up
max.
be
his
the
carefully
ica
this contract will
000. and is one of the largest trança.»
tions of jt» kiiuj on record in cottor
•tttea.
art
.A TEXAS CLERGYMAN
— v -
Bpeaks Out for thé Benefit of Suffer
ing Thousands.
R6t. G. M. Gray, Baptist clergy*
man, of Whiteaboro,. Tex., says:
I . "Four years ago I
suffered misery with
W 1 lumbRgo ' Every
— ~ movement was one
of pain. Doan's Kid
ney Pills removed
the whole difficulty
w after only a short
time. Although I do
not like to have my
name used publicly,
I make an exception
in this case, so that other sufferers
from kidney trouble may profit by my
experience."
Sold by all dealers. 50 cents a box.
Foster-Milburn Co.. Buffalo, N. T.
very
the
the
been
the
Crop
to
has
fa
the
fell
got
to
the
l\i
com
Mottoes of a Queen.
Her majesty, the queen of Portugal,
pins her faith, it is said, to the follow
ing mottoes:
Keep out of doors all you can.
Breathe outdoor air, live in it, revel
in it. Don't shut yourself up. Build
your houses so that the air supply
is good. Throw away your portieres
and bric-a-brac. Don't have useless
trifles about you.
Have a favorite form of exercise
and make the most of it. Ride on
horseback if you can; cycle if you can
not get a horse; do anything to get
out in the open air.
Don't overeat. Drink little and let
that little be pure. Don't try to
dress too much, yet dress as well as
you are able. Wear everything you
can to make yourself lovely.
DIE
river
Thou
fu
the
tem
to
and
of
over
13
the
tug
one
other
to
the
mag
LOW COLONIST FARES TO THE
WEST AND NORTHWEST.
Union Pacific Passenger Depart
ment announces that Colonist Fares
will be in effect from Sept. 15 to Oct.
15, 1909, to all points In the West and
Northwest.
This year the West looks more
promising than ever. Now is the time
to secure land at low prices, and, at
the same time, to visit the many inter
esting points in the West and North
west, at which liberal stopover ar
rangements may be made.
A better estimate of raw lands can
be made now than formerly, because
these lands are in proximity to new
farms that are producing wonderful
crops.
For descriptive
to E. L. Lomax, G. P. A., U. P. R. R.,
Omaha. Neb.
literature, write
Anything But That.
Little John is the youngest of a
family of five boys, says the Deline
ator. One day his mother said to
him: "O, John, isn't it too bad 1 have
n't one little girl? I could curl her
hair and make such pretty little
dresses for her. Don't you wish you
were a little girl?"
"Why, mother," he said, "I'd rather
be most any other kind of animal you
could mention than a girl."
in
aisles
Ed
to
rulers
York
most
cere
knew
of
43,000
rug
master
the
his
sta
coffin,
own
the
Singular and Plural.
Whenever she gets to thinking how
much they're in debt it affects her
nerves." "Huh! the w r ay it affects
her husband is singular." "How sin
gular?" "Just singular, it affects his
'nêr.ve.'- He tried to borrow a hundred
from me to-day."—Catholic Standard
and Times.
The Most Unkindest Gut.
First' Guide—Were you ever shot
for. a deer ?
Second Guide—Worse; I was snap
shotted onge.
Plans are being made for the elec
trification of the more important state
railways of Sweden.
Do you know of any woman who ever received any
benefit from taking Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com
pound ? "
If any woman who is suffering with any ailment peculiar
to her sex will ask her neighbors this question, she will be
surprised at the result. There is hardly a community in
, this country where women cannot be found who have been
restored to health by this famous old remedy, made
exclusively from a simple formula of roots and herbs.
During the past 30 years we have published thousands
of letters from these grateful women who have been cured
by Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, and
in all that time have we published a testimonial without
the writer's special permission. Never have we knowingly
published a testimonial that was not truthful and genuine.
Here is one just received a few days ago. If anyone doubts
that this is a true and honest statement of a woman's experi
ence with Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound write
and ask her.
Houston, Texas.—" When I first began taking Lydia E. Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound I was a total wreck. I had been
sick for three years with female troubles, chronic dyspepsia,
and a liver trouble. I had tried several doctor's medicines, but
nothing did me any good.
For three years I lived on medicines and thought I would
never get well, when I read an advertisment of Lydia E. Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound, and was advised to try it.
"My husband got me one bottle of the Compound, and it did
me so much good I continued its use. I am now a well woman
; and enjoy the best of health.
■ "I advise all women suffering from such troubles to give
j Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound a trial. They won't
regret it, for it will surely core you." — Mrs. Bessie L. Hicks,
. 810 Cleveland St^, Houston.
Any wpman who is sick and suffering is foolish surely
not to give such a medicine as this a trial. Why should it
K not do her as much good as it did Mrs. Hicks.
c i
never
**
I
It's Everywhere
The hale at the poor, the halls of the
rich,
Are neither exempt from some form of
itch;
Perhaps a distinction may he made in
the name,
But the rich and the poor must scratch
just the same.
Oh, why should the children of Adam
endure
An affliction so dreadful, when Hunt's
Cure does cure?
All forms of itching.
Guaranteed.
I
with
one
Kid
short
do
my
my
box.
Price 50c.
Not Qualified for the Job.
Father (Impressively)—"My son, I
want you to be very attentive to your
teacher, who is a man of wide
general Information. He
everything you need to
new
and
teach you
know." Small Boy (derisively)—"He?
He don't know nothin'!
can't even tell who's pitchin' in the
can
Why, he
league teams."
can.
revel
Build
on
can
get
let
to
as
you
They Should
"My honest conviction, based upon
my own experience and that of my
friends, is that 'Hunt's Cure' will cure
a larger per cent of skin troubles, espe
cially of an itching variety, than any
other remedy. Certainly those afflict
ed with any form of itch should try it."
J. O. Moore,
Atchison, Kas.
50c per box.
Black-Hand" Business.
The
Mrs. Bart—My husband got a letter
dreadful
to-day saying something
would happen if he didn't send the
writer a sum of money.
Mrs. Smart—My husband get*
dunned for his bills, too.
It Keeps Them Off
They are pretty bad this year—no
mistake—and they bite viciously. Wo
refer to Mosquitoes, but a little Hunt's
Lightning Oil applied to the irritated
places takes the sting away. It keeps
them off if used in time.
THE
Fares
Oct.
and
more
time
at
inter
North
ar
can
new
R.,
When a man has enough money laid
aside to kfaep him on Easy street the
rest of his days, he ought to give oth
ers a chance.
A Rare Good Thing.
"Am usinK ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE, and
can truly say I would not have been with
out it so long:, had I known the relief it
would give my aching feet,
rare
or tired
Providence. R. I." Sold by all Druggists,
25c. Ask to-day.
Bees sometimes tty two miles from
the hive and find their way back with
out difficulty.
T think it a
Rood thins for anyone having sur«
feet.—Mrs. Matilda Holtwert.
write
SICK HEADACHE
a
Deline
to
have
her
little
you
rather
you
Positively cored by *
these Little Pills.
They also relieve Di»
très« from Dyspepsia, In
digestion and Too Hearty
Eating. A perfect rem
edy for Dlulnos», Nau
sea, Drowsiness, Bait
Taste in the Mouth, Coat
ed Tongue, Pain in the
Bide, TORPID LIVER.
They regulate the Bowels. Purely Vegetable.
CARTER'S
SPITTLE
flVER
H PILLS.
SMALL PILL. SMALL DOSE. SMALL PRICE.
Genuine Must Bear
I Fac-Simile Signature
■T J REFUSE SUBSTITUTES.
[CARTERS
how
her
affects
sin- j
his
TULANE
UNIVERSITYLOUISIANA
MEW ORLEANS
shot
snap
elec
state
* 'SDWZB B. OBAIOHBAJ». LL D . FrwuUiiL
Tulane University in nil it» department», k lorsted in the City
Department»,
<cf New Ofleans, the »re^opoli» of the Smith
with twenty-three building». Modern doimitone*. extensive lab
or» tone». libraries, and museums.
Yhll Course« srs offered In Lancuani,
* ^ IngiaMriBg, Architecture, Art, Lew.
iclne. Pharmacy, and Dentistry.
'Separate Department for Women. Expense* low. Low doA
SSftory rate». Next »eiaioti of all department», except N. O. Poly
alinic, begins October i»t. Polyclinic open» November ist. Scad
for catalogue Address. R. K. Barer. S ecr et ary.
N

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