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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, December 31, 1909, Image 2

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311 ;? (Emtutumtnrafii;
J. G. Gillespie
J. L. Gillespie
GILLESPIE & SON,
EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS.
Subscription $1.80 per Yearin Advance
Long Distance Cmnb. Phone No. 33.
Official Paper of Leflore County and of
the City of Greenwood.
Obituaries, Tributes of Respect and
Cards of Thanks in this paper will be
enarged for at the rate of 5 cents a line.
Subscribers not receiving their paper
promptly will please notify the office.
Changes in address should be reported
promptly.
Greenwood, Miss., Friday, Dec. 31, 1909
Everybody says that Greenwood
is outstripping all her sister cities,
so it must be so.
Diamonds are becoming more
costly, but at the present eggs are
most interesting.
We are in receipt of the handsome
holiday editions of The Greenwood
Commonwealth, which was issued
They were well filled
last week,
with good advertising and reading;
a number of pages. It reflected cred
it upon its publishers and town.—
Kilmicbael Record.
The handsome holiday edition is
sued last week by the esteemed
Greenwood Commonwealth was one
of the best papers we have seen is
sued this year, and we congratulate
Bro. Gillespie upon his enterprise
arid success on this splendid issue—
Eupora Progress-Warden.
Another magnificent Chritmas is
sue received at this office was The
Greenwood Commonwealth, which
consists of twenty.four pages of
well-gotten-up matter, including the
lithograph cover, more than seven
teen pages of which consisted of
artistic advertisements. — Newton
Record.
The absolute truth is seldom pos
sible to investigation; what is truth
was propounded in the shape of a
question by one who spoke by ins
piration, and the human authority
failed to make reply. If the juror
rigidly obeyed the instructions to
give the benefit of all reasonable
doubt to the accused, who could be
convieed. The most conclusive tes
timony has been proven false, and
men have hanged on their own con
fession for crimes they did not com
mit. The dias of the mind is inde
pendent of the will, and if the fall
intent and meaning of the law were
observed only philosophers could
serve in the j urv box.
Credulity is a quality often charg
ed against people in masses. As we
see it sometimes, it is with reason
able corrections characterized as a
form of hysteria. What is not so
commonly recognized is that incred
ulity is just as much a popular feel,
ing. It is as much a form of hyster
ia as is its opposite. Its victims
may sit coldly back in their chairs,
sneer politely, regard themselves far
superior to other people intellect.
And yet by the very tokens of that
hysteria and the "fixed idea" of
psychology have much in common,
so have these manifestations of pop
ular credudity and incredulity.
THE STATE MILITIA.
Legislature is being urged by
those versed in National Guard
matters in this state in favor of an
annual appropriation of $25,000 and
an emergency fund of $5,000. This
demand appears reasonable enough
and so is the further demand that
the pay of enlisted men, when in ac
tive service, be made double the
army rate. The low pay of enlisted
men in the army is on of the causes
of the numerous desertions from the
regular establishment; every enlist
ed man in the militia earns at least
double the amount of wages of the
army private. The appropriation
for military purposes in Mississippi
is out of the proportion with the
work that the militia has been called
on to perform in recent years. Large
standing armies are neither wanted
or needed in this country. Their
place is better filled with the citizen
soldiery, who in addition to its pride
of uniform also has the welfare of
the country at heart in a different
manner from regulars,
means let us encourage the militia
boys, and request the members of
the legislature to make an appro
priation which, it seems, is smaller
than that of any other State with a
population equal to that of Missis-1
iiPPi.
By all
T* SENATORIAL SUCdSSHNl
The Legislature which is to con
vene next week in our beautiful
capital city has no easy task before
it. Besides the thousands of impor
tant measures that will be brought
before it for final adjudication, the
most important act of this session
will no doubt be the election of a
United States Senator to represent
Mississippi and to succeed the la
mented McLaurin.
It is being hoped that the present
legistatnre will deal a deathblow to
the professional politician. There
are psychological moments in the his
tory of commonwealths when the
people get away from the beaten
paths and confer their highest poli
tical honors on men peculiarly fitted
to hold office. On the arrival of
these moments the professional poli
tician becomes a dead number. We
hope that our legislature has arrived
at such a moment and that the next
three or five weeks will tell this. We
hope that they will lay aside all pre
judice and passion allow their votes
to be gagged by the man possessing
senatorial qualifications.
They should at once begin the
study of what are senatorial quali
fications so that at the time of selec
tion, they may elect the man that is
most properly fitted for the place.
Rampant ravings, vitrolic denunica
tions and rhetorical tirades have no
effect in the Senate. The militant
leaders, insurgents, radicals, and the
extremists find a poor area in the
senatorial chamber. Their every
attempt to revolutionize this great
est of deliberative bodies result in
dismal failures. A man to repre
sent our state that would becoming
the laughing stock, be burlesqued,
ridiculed and derided until he is
truly a pitiable subject, is not the
man that Mississippians wishes to
represent them. Mississippi does
not crave the novelty of their rep
resentatives stirring up sensations
and fussing at the Capital City. An
esteemed contemporary says that
good, common, horse-sense, capacity
for work, business judgment, calm
ness of thought, and ability of ana
lysis on problems of world-wide im
portance are the essential qualifica
tions for a United States Senator.
The wearer of a toga, with nothing
to recommend him save fiery oratory
and fervid rhetoric, does nothing
but mildew in Washington.
Mr. Law-maker, there will be no
lack of aspirants for the unexpired
term of the late United States Senator.
The field of eligibles presents a
well-nigh limitless wealth of mater
ial. There was never a time in her
history when Mississippi was unable
to offer men for membership in the
greatest deliberative body in the
world who could measure up to the
requirements of the office. Her for
mer senators have been without
peers in the senate. They have
gained distinction for the magnolia
state. They have added prestige to
the state where oratory is in flower.
You, Mr. Legislature, are now de
pended upon to maintain this exalt
ed standard. The ablest statesman
in the commonwealth should be
elected by you to fill this vacant sen
atorship. Our state wants a senator
that can be placed in a class with
Davis, George, Lamar and Walthall.
Your sober, sensible, and thinking
ttuaking constituency will not toler
ate a demagogue or a mountebank.
If the whirligig of politics should
decree the election of such a man,
his tenure will not extend beyond
the unexpired term. Mississippi
will not have a sensationalist nor
extremist. Their former election
for senator expressed disapproval of
this political type. They will not
be deceived by rampant rediculism,
nor led astray by an alluring but
erratic personality.
It is up to the Legislature to put
aside questions of personal perfer
ence, to use the judgment with
which they have been endowed and
vote for the man who it honestly be
lieves will reflect the largest meas
ure of credit upon the state of Mis
sissippi. We must be represented
by big, brainy, broadmined, un
biased men in Halls of Congress.
Mr. Legislator you know your duty.
You can not snub it. Elect a man
that will be a memorial to your
body.
„ r .
to thr latter part ol last
Urn*.
Those winds in Pittsburg that
blew away $250.00 in stamps must
have been well posted.
Mrs. Parker gave » most delightful
entertai nment We dn es day evening oat
of compliment to Missss Gladys Bacon
and Vcnita Baeon. Panning and other
its wove thoroughly enjoyed
by the jolly guests.
TK McLAUHN suggesskm.
The following pertinent editorial
from a recent issue of the esteemed
Memphis Commercial Appeal is
highly appreciated by all patriotic
Mississippians, and The Common
wealth reproduces it with the most
hearty approval of the sentiments so
admirably expressed:
Governor Noel will leave the
work of selecting a successor to the
late Senator Anselm J. McLaurin to
the legislature of Mississippi. The
contest will be sharp.
Before McLaurin's death, Mr.
Vardaman was active in preparation
to make the contest against him, and
other prominent men were being so
licited to make the race. . Mr. Var
daman will doubtless press his can
didacy before the Legislature for the
vacancy.
"The Commercial Appeal has no
thought of suggesting to the people
of Mississippi what man they should
send to the United States Senate,
but The Commercial Appeal does
have a large circulation in the State,
and, feeling that a Senator from
Tennessee, and all the other South
ern States, we believe that it will not
be regarded as an impertinence if
we suggest the sort of a man that
should be selected.
"Mississippi is a State of splendid
traditions, some of which had their
beginnings in the Senate of the Uni
ted States as well as on the battle
field.
u
«4
"In some of the Southern States
there has been a decline in the stan
dard of ability of man in national
life.
"Time was when Senators from
the South, because of their great at
tainments, impressed their character
upon the nation, and were instru
mental in shoping national affairs.
This decline is the character of
public men was not so great in Mis
sissippi as in some of the other
Southern States.
Indeed, the Mississippi delega
tion in Congress has generally been
strong, and forceful.
"To have had four United States
Senators of the calibre of Jefferson
Davis, George, Walthall and Lamar,
is an honor of which any State may
pe proud.
In this coming contest, we be
lieve the people of Mississippi,
through the deliberations of the leg
islators, will be apart from that per
sonal element of politics, which so
often causes men in the heat of pub
lic debate on the stump to declare
for their preference on personal
grounds rather than to make up a
decision and act upon it after claim
and mature deliberation.
"Senators from Mississippi in the
past have been neither "swashbuck
lers" nor fanatics. Mississippi has
been fortunate indeed in having men
in the upper house of the national
Congrese who appreciated the great
dignity of the office, and conducted
themselves accordingly.
In their work they have not been
sensationalists, nor extremists
"The next selection should be
that of a man thorough in knowl
edge of the philosophy of a Republi
can form of government, with a keen
appreciation of human liberty and
with that broap democracy of spirit
that dominated the life of Jefferson
and which was so well understood
and appreciated and lived up to by
George, Lamar and Walthall.
"Mississippi is a big State. In it
today are many big minded men,
and the choice for the Senate should
be the biggest brained men in that
State.
44
u
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44
It does seem that a State having
such splendid types of citizens as
Longstreet, Whitfield, Leroy Percy,
Alexander, Scott, Sexton and Mayes
should make a selection of a man
to succeed the lamented McLaurin,
who would serve his State well, aud
serve the nation well.
U
n
THE SENATORSHIP.
To The Commercial Appeal:
Would it not have been more man
ly, courageous and honorably if you
had distinctly assaulted Gov. Var
daman than to have used the Italian
stiletto carried in your editorial of
this date? Gov. Vardaman's friends
respect a fair and open fighter.
Your modesty is "child-like and
bland" in assuming "that it will not
be considered as an impertinence if
we suggest the "sort of a man that
should be selected,
We appreciate your unselfish in
terest in suggesting that "the choice
fur the senate should be the biggest
brained man in that state.
If you have forgotten the measure
of Gov. Vardaman 's standing in the
estimation of Mississippians, you can
pfreoh your memory by reference to
»»
tt
the vote given him in the late sena
' PaifeP- j -
Very respectfully,
B. F. WARD.
of
a
a
m
Winona* Miss., Dec. 24.
Even the biindest partisanship
can not justify the charge that our
editorial was a direct or stiletto like
attack on Gov. Vardaman.
In our editorial we mention the
fact of Gov. Vardaman's candidacy,
but did not include him in a list of
men forming a class from which we
thought, and think yet, the people
Mississippi might select the best
senator.
Mr. Ward evidently believes that
Gov. Vardaman would make the best
senator of all those discussed.
W ithout for a moment disparag
ing the many excellent qualities of
Gov. Vardaman and his ability as
an orator, we beg to say that Gov.
Vardaman would not be the best
possible selection as a senator.
Mr. Ward has full confidence in
his opinion.
We have the same confidence in
ours.
The previous contest has no place
as a deciding factor in the present
compaign. The contestants are not
the same. Besides, as a deciding
factor it would be unfair to Gov.
Vardaman, for he lost.
That all our correspondents do
not take the view or the editorial
expressed by Mr. Ward, is evidenced
by the following:
To The Commercial Appeal:
As a native born son of Mississip
pi, I wish to thank you for your time
ly, wise and patriotic editorial in
yesterday's paper on the senatorial
situation in this state. I do not
think it at all necessary for you to
apologize for taking a profound in
terest in the public afiairs of Missis
sippi, as only an invisable geogra
phic line separates our citizens from
you and yours. As you suggest, we
not only need a broad and profound
man for senator, but one who only
knowns what our state and the na
tion needs, but also knows how to
present those needs before the world
in a forceful, but calm and dignified
manner.
We need a man full of energy, fire
and patriotic zeal, but who can dis
play these tributes in a sane, cool
and dispassionate way; one who
combines the brilliant imagination
and eloquence of an S. S. Prentiss
with the far-seeing wisdom, patience
and unceasing industry of an Alex
ander H. Stephens or a J. Z. George.
We welcome your aid and advice
toward this realization. Yours,
"A NATIVE SON."
Coffeeville, Miss., Dec. 24.
The Knights of Pythias held an im
portant meeting at their hail in this
city Thursday evening. Special ar
rangements were made for the meeting
of the Grand Lodge of this excellent
fraternal order which will be held in
this city next May. After the mee t
ing the members repaired to the Kandy
Kitchen where delicious refreshments
were served. The following officers
were elected:
B. Stewart, Y. C.; F. R. Williams, Pres.;
B. H. Brown, M. A.; J. H. Pettey, M. W.;
Warner Wells, K. R. S.; M. F. Aaron, M.
C. V. Williford, I. G.; T. F. Pro
W. M. Hamner, C. C., G.
of E.;
phet, C. G.
TRUTH ABOUT CATARRH.
Sensible Methods Will Cure It. S. L
Raines Guarantees Hyomel to
s Cure Catarrh.
Catarrh can never be cored by taking
medicines into the stomach nor by
sprays, atomizers or douches.
Intelligent physicians have long ago
discarded such ideas and not one of
them would be worth consideration
were it not for the fact that unscrup
ulous persons prey upon the ignorance
of the people in regard to new discov
eries.
Catarrh is caused by germs and jnst
as long as these germs thrive in the
folds, crevices, nooks and corners of the
mucous membrane that line the nose,
throat and chest, jnst so long wiU yon
have catarrh.
There is only one way to cure ca
tarrh, and that is to kill the germs.
There is only one remedy that wiU
kill the germs when it gets where the
germs are, and that is Hyomei.
Hyomei is made chiefly from Austral
ian eucalyptus and eucalyptol com
bined with other germ killing anti
septics. Jnst breathe it in through the
hard rubber inhaler that comes with
each outfit and relief is immediate.
Used regularly for a few weeks Hyomei
(pronounced High-o-me) will cure
chronic catarrh. Complete outfit $1.00
at 8. L. Raines and leading druggists
everywhere.
if
MPONA
Cutes indigestion
it relieves stomach misery, sour
aeh, belching, and cures all stomach dis
ease or money back.
based tab
aU
IK NEW SENATOR.
A splendid tribute to the Confed
eracy was paid by Governor Noel
this morning in appointing Col.
James Gordon to the United States
senate as the temporary successor
of Senator A. J. McLaurin.
The Stars and Bars had no more
loyal or intrepid follower than the
gallant veteran who organized the
Second Mississippi Cavalry, and his
old comrades will deeply appre
ciate Governor Noel's action in
sending him to the United States
senate, even though his tenure will
be for a period of but a few weeks.
Especially is it gratifying tha*
Governor Noel's selection is a man
who pledges himself not to become
a candidate for the unexpired term.
The senatorial contest should be
a free-for-all fight, and it is Missis
sippi's duty to send her strongest
and ablest statesman to Washing,
ton to fill McLaurin's seat.
By naming a man who has no am
bition to hold the seat permanently,
Governor Noel thus avoids giving
the prestige of appointment to any
aspirant, and leaves the field open
for any and all who may desire to
enter the contest.
!
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It was a diplomatic stroke, and
none of the probable candidates
have just cause to enter complaint.
Trot out your entries for the big
The track is
derby, gentlemen,
clear, the going is fast, and there is
always a chance for the black horse
to win the race.—Jackson News,
Dec. 27th.
We highly endorse what the es
teemed Jackson Daily News says in
regard to the appointment of Col.
James Gordon as senator by Gov.
E. F. Noel.
It was indeed a stroke
of diplomacy on the part of our es
teemed Governor, who is an adept
in extricating himself from political
dilemmas with credit to himself and
his proud constituency. This gal
lant ex-Confederate veteran, who
will temporarily wear the Sen
atorial Toga, has been quite prom
inent in the political life of our
commonwealth, and, in the course
of human events, considering the
rapid depletion of the ranks of those
who wore the grey, he will perhaps
be the last ex-Confederate veteran
to be sent to the United States Sen
ate from Mississippi. Col. Gordon
is a real gentleman of the old school
—a true representative of the old
South
a typical Southerner.
While in both branches of the leg
islature, he was recognized as one
of the most level-headed men in the
law-making body. Not so very lo
quacious, but when he had anything
to say, it was said an J listened to,
and generally his advice was heeded.
Gov. Noel certainly did the State
t
an honor in naming him for the
honor of succeeding the lamented
McLaurin.
The Commonwealth
congratulates Gov. Noel on the way
in which he disentangled himself
from a troublesome situation, and
the State on having so distinguished
a senator as James Gordon.
«*► «*•
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Y No araenic or other poisons; no ♦
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Greenwood now has an Ex
pert Accountant. Phone or
oBonCHAS. F. JOHNSON.
! GREENWOOD GROGERY GO. 1
WHOLESALE GROCERS.
;
»
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\\ OUR SPECIALTIES:
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Office :
Opposite K A M. V. Depot.
o Warehouses: On Southern and Y. A M. V. Tracks.
GREENWOOD, MISS.


%


W. T. JOHNSON,
Vice-President.
A. F. GARDNER.
President.
ROBERT WILSON ♦
Cashier *

Bank of LeFlore I
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:
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:
GREENWOOD, MISS.
$100 000 .
- $23,000.
ALL EMPLOYEES OF THIS BANK ARE BONDED
CAPITAL
SURPLUS
Î
e
••••
:
STATE OF MISSISSIPPI DEPOSITORY.
YAZOO-M1SSISSIPPI DELTA LEVEE BOARD DEPOSITORY.
DIRECTORS :
A. F. Gardner, A. Davidson, Robert Wilson, S. L. Brister, B. L. Young,
W T Johnson, C L Lomax, J Kantrovitz,8 C Lenoir, A 'Weiler, W T Fountain
1
:
:
■ I-I-l-I ' I - l - I - I -- M -» - M - l - M - I - I - I - M - I - M - I - M - l - I - M HIM -»
!
A
DELTA BANK
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•F-H- - i - l - I - H - M - l - i - F - I - M -l- M - IH - l - I - I - l - l - l - L

I
Y. T. EGGLESTON, Manager.
T. H. DENNIS, Secy A Tread.
A. G. McLEMORE, Pres.
R. W. BAIRD, Vice-Pres.
I
Planters Supply Co.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
GREENWOOD, MISS.
J
%
GROCERIES A FEED STUFFS A SPECIALTY.
:
i
# Prompt Attention Given Orders and Satisfaction *
Guaranteed.
5

i
t
Red Feat her Coal 1
$5.00 Per Ton.
4
i
SPECIAL PRICES MADE FILLING COAL
HOUSES DURING SUMMER MONTHS.
s

BEST ALABAMA COAL
$3.50 Per Ton.
C. E. WRIGHT ICE & COAL CO
i
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THE GREENWOOD FOUNDRY
Iron, Brass and General Castings
NEATLY EXECUTED
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Brake Down Castings a Specialty. |
YOUR BUSINESS SOLICITED,
C. J. CLIEFORD. I
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A Piano of Known Value.
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BUSH & GERTS
THE ONLY UNION PIANO.
Nearly fifty thousand American citizens have BUSH & GERTS
pianos in their homeo and furnish unsolicited endorsement of
the tonal virtues and endnring qualities of these excellent in
struments.
We know these instruments are good and we unreservedly guar
antee them. They cost very little more than ordinary pianos and
can be purchased on easy monthly, quartly or yearly payments.
*
»
E. E. Forbes Piano Company
C. J. ROBERTS. Manager
E. CAPITAL STREET
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI

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