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The commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1896-1923, February 18, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89065008/1916-02-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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34».
MRS. J. !.. GILLESPIE, SOCIETY EDITOR-PHONE 718.
MATINEE MUSICALE ENTER
TAINED
The Matinee Musicale Club was
delightfully entertained on last
Wednesday by Mrs. R. A. Ball, and
the following interesting and appre
ciated program was rendered:
Paper on "Life of Regermax"
was read by Mrs. A. Q. Quinn. This
was followed by an instrumental solo,
"Gavotte", by Regermax, rendered
by Miss Fannie Gardner.
Miss Jane
Case sang in her inimitable
"A Little Pink Rose", which was fol
lowed by "Polonaise",
from Chopin, by Mrs. W. M. Whit
tington.
manner,
a selection
Miss
Sadie
reading of "A Sisterly Scheme" was
most acceptable, and Miss Guy Hall'»
vocal solo, "From the Land of the
Sky Blue Water", was also thorough
ly enjoyed,
instrumental solo was followed by a
vocal solo, "A Song of the Soul"
beautifully
Kimbrough.
Robinson's
Mrs. Roger Friermood's
sung by Miss Dollie
The next meeting of the club will
be held at the home of Miss Fannie
Gardner, on Feb. 23rd.
•o
One of the
able pat ties of the
prettiest and most enjoy
season was that o:
Mrs. R. B. Dorman in her pretty bunjr
alow, on the
Greenwood, on
Boulevard,
Wednesday afternoon.
I en tables of six-handed rook
ranged for the
in North
were ar
guests in the spacious
lower floor, which was beautiful with
pot plants, pink carnations and
hyacinths,
carried out
freshments which
ideal afternoon and the handsome
tumes of the women, and the beautiful
apartments made a complete and per
fect picture.
white
1 he same color motif being
in every detail in the re
were delicious. The
cos
o
Mr. and Mrs. Robt. W. Baird and
daughter, Miss Marion, left Sunday
for Atlanta, where Miss Baird will
undergo an operation for appendi
citis.
They were accompanied as far
as Winona by Messrs. Robert De
Loach and Jim Davis, of Itta Bena.
A
\
*/
I
j
I
■arrn
!
The Man Who
Looks Ahead
Most persons have some goal to which they
steer their hopes, but many thoughtlessly unnerve
the hand, and dull the brain by faulty living, then
wonder why success is not achieved.
Among the everyday habits of life that often
upset health is coffee drinking, an ancient and re
spectable custom, but harmful to many.
The average cup of coffee contains about 2\
grains of caffeine, which, gradually accumulating
in the system, often causes nervous prostration,
heart trouble, mental depression, etc.
There's an easy way out of coffee troubles—
quit the coffee and use
POSTUM
This pure food-drink is a simple combination
of whole wheat roasted with a little wholesome
molasses—nothing else. It has a snappy, aromatic
flavour similar to coffee but is entirely free from the
drug, caffeine, or an/ other injurious substance.
There are two forms tf Postum. The original Postum
Cereal must be boiled, iöc and 25c packages; Instant
Postum, soluble in a cup %f hot water, 30c and 50c tins«
Both have equal flavour, and tost about the
For those who appreciate the opportunity and
power that goes with health
u
same.
There's a Reason
for POSTUM
99
Send 2e stamp for 5-cup sample of Tnstant Postum.
LOVELY VALENTINE PARTY
On the afternoon of the eleventh,
the lovely riverside home of Mr. and
Mrs. J. H. Ellington was thrown open
to the friends of their charming
young daughter, Mary Blanche, for
the celebration of Valentine Day.
The elaborate decorations, of eupids
and hearts, in graceful festoons,
under the soft shades of rose color,
made a most enchanting picture.
Some thirty-six guests were invited,
and enjoyed the occasion,
of different kinds were played amid
much hilarity and fun.
telling, one of the features, was es
pecially interesting, as even these
young people steal time from their
Games
Fortune
high school studies, to wonder who
will "It" be in the future, that shines
before their enchanted eyes in rain
bow tints. Life's road opens before
them, a silver thread, not a cloud to
mar their skies of perfect blue.
Ifouth and its dreams! What is
more beautiful?
A guessing contest
was the source of much merriment.
-\fter spirited contest, Misses Eugenia
Rennie and Lucille Ferguson were
the lucky winners of the
heart-shaped boxes of candy,
gentlemen's
prizes,
The
prizes were won by
Masters Allen Kimbrough and Sam
Brister. A lovely two-course lun
cheon was served, in which the
valentine idea was tastefullly carried
out. After a most delightful after
noon had been spent, lingering good
byes were exchanged, and the little
girls were escorted home by their
"gentlemen friends",
Valentine's Day
them it will ever remain a white mile
stone on the tablets of their hearts.
and their
over ; but to
was
XXX.
-o
Mrs. Dr. E. E. Bullock and children
have returned from Hot Springs. Ark.,
where Mrs. Bullock has been under
going treatment at this popular resort.
Her many friends are glad to note her
splendid improvement. Dr. Bullock
accom
met his*family in Memphis and
panied them home last Saturday.
KING'S DAUGHTERS ASK AID FOR
HOSPITAL.
_
t° Lelioi-e County.
^ We have been struggling along for
nine years doing the best we could
for the suffering, and we have done
T"
at hand and the great disadvantages
we ave a ore un er.
To the Citizens of Leflore County:
We have an institution in your
capitol city, that ought to attract the
attention of every man, woman and
child in this grand country of yours.
Is there anything in all your midst
that has done more for the good of
all classes of your citizens than the
King's Daughters Hospital?
and think what this institution means
Stop
The time has come when we must
be better equipped for doing greater
things for the sick and suffering.
We have sent out some good
from our little house.
The State law now is, that a nurse
who graduates from a hospitl with
less than twenty beds cannot be
registered in the State; in justice to
these girls who labor so well for us,
we must have a larger building,
close up our institution. Will Le
flore County and the City of Green
wood with all their boasted wealth
deny the means to make the best
thing she has the pride of our hearts
and the love of our work what it
should be? Nay verily,
we must, we will have our new hos
pital before another year closes.
Outside of helping the sick, and
the benefit of helping those who
not able to take their suffering
to some far away and famous hos
pital, it is also wise for you to remem
ber that the rich as well as the poor
are sometimes taken sick unexpect
edly and the case is so urgent that
unless a hospital is near by, it means
death, and this may mean
The training of the girls and fit
ting them for better women along all
lines is one of our greatest works.
Make it possible for us to train more
girls, and build a hospital of fame of
We can do it if all will
nurses,
or
We can,
are
ones
you.
our own.
lend a helping hand.
Then when the time comes to act
we shall expect help from every citi
zen of
point us.
Don't disap
our county.
Make it your interest and
our new hospital is a surety.
Very truly,
Mrs. R. Thayer, Ch'm.
Mrs. L. P. Quinn,
Mrs. Dr. Rennie,
Mrs. J. Gearhiser,
Mrs. Dr. Tyree,
Committee.
-o
MISS LILLIAN WELLS PROMINENT
IN RECITAL.
Miss' Lillian Wells, of Greenwood,
Mississippi, was among the principals
in the Saturday Noon Recital given by
students of the Cincinnati College of
Music. Miss Wells was heard in the
delightful group of songs: "A Youth
Passed .By'Fair Jessie" by Cicle and
"The Merry Dance is O'er" by Von
Ficilitz.
Her voice showed the results
of thorough conscientious training,
with pure and correct tones, while her
phrasing and execution were admirable.
It was from this same institution that
Mary Hissen DeMoss, Helen Von Don
hoff, Carl Gantvoort, Walter Vaughan
and Cyrena Van Gordon, Aim Beck and
many other not*d vocal artists have
entered into their successful careers.
STATE SUNDAY SCHOOLS TO
MEET
The 39 Annual Sunday School Con
vention of Mississippi Sunday School
workers meets at the First Baptist
Church, Hattiesburg, Miss., April
11th, 12th and 13th, 1916.
Among the visiting speakers are
Marion Lawrence, General
Secretary for North America, Bishop
James Atkins, of Waynesville, N. C.,
Prof. E. O. Excell, the great song
writer and leader, and Alvin W.
Roper, the sacred pianist. The pro
gram will provide for discussions of
every phase of the Sunday School
work.
The good people of Hattiesburg
offer free entertainment, and the
railroads will make reduced rates.
All Sunday School workers
vited.
Mr.
are in
~o
Mrs. Simon Hyman was the hostess
of the Jewish ladies 500 club on last
Thursday. Delightful refreshments
were served at the conclusion of the
games. The prizes were won by Mes
dames Bernstein and Goodman.
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Stigler, of Green
wood, came down and spent Sunday
with Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Stigler and
family. Mr. Stigler returned on the
late train, but Mrs. Stigler and Jesse,
Jr., remained for a longer visit. —Yazoo
Herald.
-o
Mrs. B. B. Provine was the charm
ing hostess of the Wednesday after
noon bridge club the past week. After
a most spirited game the prize was won
by Mrs. Will Humphrey. Dainty
freshments were beautifully served.
re
■o
Mrs. Ed Rast, of Jackson, is tbe at
tractive guest of Mrs. B. B. Provine,
Mrs. Rust is so pleasantly remembered
here by her admirera as Miss Eula
Oliver, formerly of West Point.
o
Miss Mary Aston has returned to
her home in St. Lotus, after an en
joyable visit to her mother, Mrs.
Dennis, at Berclair.
Mrs. J. L Gillespie has returned
to «tou,« ,»d
R
mu
*
•Ä- 1
GREENWOOD'S WAR
We appreciate the fact that we
recognized as
In The State", but our "Clean-up
should mean more than simply
beautifying. It should mean sanita
tion of solid and lasting good to
otherwise enterprising city,
war against disease.
The number of preventable dis
eases in the United States each year
is over a half million, from lack
. sanitation and of course we have
(share of ttese . We als „ have
j preventable death rate. Once men
, were taught that dcath was „ t
Divine Pl . ovidence but
h « h «t. among infanta
considered as an evidence of h,.-,.
weakness, ignorance and negligence.
Certainly Providence works through
human agencies, and in this field
reap what we sow.
If every individual in our beautiful
"Queen City" could be brought
realize how great our moral as well
as our physical injury is from disease,
and that it is no less contemptible
us to let our children and
neighbor's children die through
neglect from attacks of microbes
of preventable, degenerate disease,
than to fail to protect them from the
attacks of human foes. We'd certain
ly make our "Clean-up Day
genuine sanitation.
Hie Cleanest Town
<4
of
our
A real
our
our
now our
our
our
ft
one
If our health officers, specialties
in the "Clean-up
pastors of our churches and
individual an a position to spread
sanitary knowledgs would make
peals to individuals for co-operative
work, we'd marvel at the results for
the health of our city.
ft
campaigns, the
every
ap
There is no
doubt that poverty is the greatest
enemy to the health of
any com
munity, so let us not forget to help
some > of the less fortunate ones to
make their homes more beautiful and
sanitary.
When we've done this
we've raised our moral standard, too
for when man is feeble in body, he's
feeble in mind also, and
to fall for temptations,
be more liberal with our efforts to
ward sanitation and
flowers on coffins.
more apt
So let us
put fewer
C. S. D.
■o
A portrait of yourself is a dainty
compliment to send to a dear friend at
Easter. Don't leave it till too late.
The Spurrier Studio, Makers of Fine
Photographs.
-o
The Thursday bridge club met with
Mrs. Will Pillow last week. The prize
won by Miss Shearer. Dainty
freshments were served.
was
re
o
Mr. and Mr. W. C. McBee
are
receiving congratulations from their
many friends upon the arrival of a
fine girl at their home or. West Wash
ington Avenue.
Misses Lottie ana Tüïh* Mont
gomery, of Greenville and Rosedale,
are the highly appreciated guests of
Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Dulaney this
week.
•o
Mrs. W. A. Mothershead went
to Memphis Wednesday to
"Madam Butterfly" rendered at the
Lyric by the Boston Grand Opera
Company.
up
see
o
Mrs. R. Reiman and daughter, Miss
Flora, went up to Memphis Wednesday
to see the Boston
Grand Opera,
Madam Powlona and John Drew,
Thursday night.
on
-o
Born—On Saturday, January 12, a
boy, to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. N.
residing on Johnson street.
Jr. is his name.
Fulton,
Charles N.
-o
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Taylor are be
ing congratulated upon the arrival of
a lovely girl at their home on West
River Front.
-o
Mr. and Mrs. Cox, of Runnymeade,
arrived from their bridal trip Tuesday
and are guests of the Reiman House
for a few days.
-o
Mrs. May Webb has returned from
a two month's visit to her daughter,
Mrs. H. B. Perry, and other relatives
at Trenton, Tenn.
Mrs. Sweanny, of Minter City, was
in town Wednesday.
There is a Real Difference
Cream of tartar, derived from grapes,
Is used in Royal Baking Powder because
it is the best and most healthful! ingredient
known for the purpose.
Phosphate and alum, whicii are de
rived from mineral sources, an? used in
some baking powders, instead of cream of
tartar, because they are cheaper.
If you have been induced to us e baking
powders made from alum or phosphate,
use Royal Baking Powder instead You
will be pleased with the results a nd the
difference in the quality of the food.
j
ROYAL BAKING POWDER. CO.
New Yolk .
1
essai
-
■ : f ■
i
isgiS
Lk.
ÏSÂ'4
Mr. W. T. Fountain has returned
from a visit to the Northern and
Eastern markets where he has pur
chased a mammoth stock of goods for
the winter trade of Fountain's Big
Busy Store. Mr. Fountain made
most exhaustive search for the very
latest and best of early summer of
ferings, and the stock that will be
received shortly will surpass any in
lateness and quality ever received in
Greenwood, and the shoppers of this
community will be afforded unusual
advantages by seeing the offerings of
this popular establishment before
laying in their summer necessities in
their line.
f
i,
ft
o
Mr. A. S. Wilson, who recently
purchased a 1916 model Hupmobile,
came through the country with his
new car from Memphis, accompanied
by Mr. O. M. McDonald, manager of
the Peoples Garage, who made the
sale to Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson is
highly pleased with the new model of
this substantial car, and they both
were agreeably surprised to find the
roads from Memphis to Greenwood
in good condition at this time of the
year.
-o
M. C. Mobley was down from near
Shellmound on business Monday and
made this office an appreciated call.
Mr. Mobley, with Mr. Perrin,
and operate the old Wall place in that
section of the county, and we prize
their indentification with
County agricultural and other inter
ests.
own
Leflore
-o
Gid
Joyner, representing the
Remington Arms Co., and formerly
with Henderson & Baird Hdw. Co.,
°f this city, was among his old Green
wood friends the latter part of last
week,
-o
Mr. Will Humphrey has received a
handsome Packard touring car, which
he ordered some time ago.
is indeed a thing pf beauty, and is the
first Packard car to be owned in this
city.
The car
-o
E. R. Wiggins and A. W. Stevens
were in Memphis Wednesday and part
of Thursday, seeing Pavlowa and
Madam Butterfly" at the Lyric
Theatre.
((
o
Our good friend, W. D. Martin was
up from Morgan City on business
Tuesday and paid The Commonwealth
an appreciated call.
o
W. B. Hill, the genial representa
tive of the Underwood Typewriter
Company, was among his Greenwood
buyers this week.
-o
Monroe McGlurg, Jr., was down
from Sumner last Friday.
■o
Miss Daisey Stegall has returned
to her home in Jackson, Tennessee,
after a delightful visit to Mrs. Will
Humphrey.
-o
Mrs. Jesse Quinn has two charming
guests this week, Misses Myra B.
Tackett and Ruth Leverette, of Rule
ville.
~o
Miss Dot Steele returned from a
week-end visit to Grenada, where she
was the guest of Miss Walker Hughes.
o
Mrs. Sig. Hyman and baby, of Pine
Bluff are the guests of Mesdames
Goodman and Kantor.
-o
Miss Rebie Marders has returned to
her home at Oakland after a short
visit to Greenwood.
-o
Mrs. Tom Menees, of Tennessee, is
visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Menees on
Market street.
-o
Mra. J. N. Pace, of McComb, 111., is
the attractive guest of Mr. and Mrs. C.
E. Wright.
-o
Mrs. C. Levy, and son, Ralph, were
over from Gneenville visiting friends
this week.
-o
Mr. and Mrs.. E. L. Purnell were
down from HighJandale shopping Wed
nesday.
Mr. and Mrs, J. W. Turner were
'"down from Wan .eland shopping Monday.
a
THE "BATTLE CRY OF PEACE
GRIPPING WAR LESSON
ft
(From the Chicago Daily News)
Pacifists who shout against increas
ing the army and navy for national
defense receive a body blow in "The
Battle Cry of Peace," the film spec
tacle which opened at the Olympic
Theatre Sunday evening,
pictures and through sub-titles those
who decry war preparedness are
brought face to face with the disas
ter that might ensue should a power
ful foreign nation invade our shores
in our present military state.
No attempt has been made by J.
Stuart Blackton, author of the play,
to deal with his subject with kid
gloves. Blunt, unvarnished and grim
facts were set forth by Mr. Blackton
and Capt. Jack Crawford, who spoke
from the stage during the intermis
sion of the opening night, to sound a
warning to this country.
The author has deviated far from
the beaten path in picture drama
building. To drive home his message
he shows war in all its brutality and
gruesomeness, carrying his theme
into two peaceful homes which suf
fer from the invasion of a foreign
army. An observer will not find the
happy ending prevalent in most pic
ture productions. If he seeks the
American soldiers to repel the invad
ing forces at the end of the picture
he is doomed to disappointment. The
American soldier do have their in
ning with the enemy, but suffer a dis
astrous defeat and bow to the enemy,
accepting "peace at any price.
At the end of two and a half hours
In vivid
ft
of startling episodes picturing reali
ties and fantasies by double photog
raphy attended by an inspiring musi
cal score and suitable "effects," spec
tators were heard to comment how
woefully weak America is. Statisti
cal diagrams of population and wealth
compare this country with other
tions of importance and show how
ridiculously small is the army and
navy Uncle Sam provides to safe
guard his property.
Every patriotic American will be
thrilled and inspired by this play,
which distinctly is an American pro
duction for American people, adapt
ed by an American from Hudson
Maxim's book, "Defenseless Ameri
ca."
na
Hyphenated Americans will
find nothing offensive in the picture,
for the enemy comes from a mythical
country.
The spy in the play, a
distinguished looking foreigner who
masquerades as a
peace propagan
dist, is called Emanon, which read
backward stands for
U
ft
no name.
To pound home its warning, the
Vitagraph
constructed
company
buildings and destroyed them with
fire and shell; bought locomotives to
demolish them in a spectacular in
cident; engaged thousands of
and women to portray invading sol
diers and Americans fleeing before
the invaders.
men
It took scenes of New
York at its height of commercial
activity and when it was in the
throes of gayety.
sorts, with their gay picnickers mak
ing merry, oblivious of the threaten
ing clouds which are about to break,
are pictured from life.
In the opening scenes Hudson
Maxim addresses a gathering on the
necessity of preparedness, pointing
out how well prepared the heilige
ent nations in Europe were for the
The seaside re
n
present war and how poorly equipped
this country is in every way. Sub
marines are shown in action and tor
pedoes are discharged at
nary foe. The boom of the
an îmagi
cannon
from the battleships and the disap
pearing guns on land, accompanied
by appropriate sound
orchestra are absolutely thrilling.
After two reels of instructive and
inspiring film the helplessness of in
nocents is depicted.
The characters are skillfully handl
ed by Charles Richman, Norma Tal
madge, Louise Beaudet, L. Rogers
Lytton, James Morrison, Mary Mau
rice, Evart Overton, Lucille Hammill
and many others.
If some of the
from the
gruesome scenes
in the play appear a bit drawn out,
they firmly impress upon the obser
ver the basic motive of the play.
The drama is well staged and deftly
acted.
Photographically "The Battle Cry
of Peace
ft
contains some surprises.
Through trick camera work a strug
gling humanity is seen in the heart of
New York fleeing to escape the
bombs hurled from the shells of the
enemy's battleships.
Hon. A. F. Gardner attended to legal
business^this week in Jackson.
o
Gano Henry, E. G. Hamilton and W.
B. Fulkerson were down from Shell
mound Tuesday.
o
V. S. Doyle, H. S. Jones, and John
Erskine came down from the Scbla
ter Tuesday night.
<h
o
Sam M. Stein
Grenada among
friends Sunday.
was over from
his Greenwood
-o
H. L. DeLoach made a business
visit to Memphis the latter part of
j the week, spending three days in the
Bluff City.
■o
W. M. Kimbrough, of the Kimbrough
Auto Co., Inc., attended the Chalmers'
Dealers Meet at Memphis the middle
of this week.
o
Rev J. H. Ingram, of Ruleville, and
Ed Scblater and Emmett Ethridge, of
Schlater, were in Greenwood on busi
ness Wednesday.
1
i
ft
"SARI" SCORES HIT AT
ATLANTA
increas
national
"The
spec
Olympic
those
are
disas
power
shores
J.
play,
kid
grim
spoke
a
from
drama
message
and
theme
suf
foreign
the
pic
the
invad
picture
The
in
dis
enemy,
hours
"With Charlie
Meakina
and
Dorothy Webb taking the principal
roles, with'a number of good voices,
as well caparisoned and capable
chorus and an exceptional orchestra.
Sari" made a big hit at the Atlanta
theatre last night," says the Atlanta
Constitution under date of Feb. Ith.
"Mr. Meakina rivals his popularity
with "The Merry Widow" and Misa
Webb played an exceptionally hard
comedy role in a manner which kept
the large audience continually laugh
ing.
t*
vivid
"Many, of course, who have not
seen "Sari" are familiar with soma
of the music.
The "Hasasaa" dance of. Mr.
Meakina and Miss Webb was quite
the feature of the show.
■ 4
"J. K. Murray as Pali Racz, the
old Gypsy violinist, who could not
waif a fading flame of fame back to
glory, is both a singer and an actor
of exceptional ability. He has a
splendid baritone voice and his
"The Faithful Stradvari,
second act was very popular.
"The really exceptional voices of
the company are those of H. W.
Marsh and Mary Lane.
Mr. Marsh's voice is a tenor of
exceptional power and quality and
one suspects that Miss Lane could
sing evert better than she had
opportunity last night,
very fine soprano voice, which seemed
to find its opportunity for full volume
ond play in but one note in one song.
Her dUet with Mr. Marsh was all the
more beautiful because of the
feet blending of the two voices.
song,
in the
»•

an
She has a
reali
photog
musi
spec
how
wealth
how
and
safe
be
play,
pro
adapt
Ameri
per
"The comedy part of Cadeau
played by Frank Farrington, is a suc
cess
x, as
of wonderful laugh-producing
powers.
"The operetta is of the well-known
Russian type, and the plot is only i
music is vivacious,
na
in
cidental. The
tuneful and catchy.
"The chorus is a good dancing and
singing organization, composed of
young and pretty women gorgeously
gowned.
"The orchestra with "Sari" is a
feature of such unusual merit that
it has as one of its attractoins
bali.
a cym
What is a cyrabali? Surely it
cannot be said that anyone could
plead himself so devoid of knowledge
of musicl instruments to ask such a
question, but lest someone should, be
it said:
A cymbali is a four-legged instru
ment that looks like the sounding
board of a piano làid down flat with
the word "Budapest" in gilt letters
on the front of it, and which, when
played by a man with a bald head
and mustche, utters a sound some
thing like
ous Italian harp.
"Sari" will fill the bill at the Green
Theatre ' Thursday night, Feb.
will
a
a
who
read
the
with
to
in
sol
before
men
extraordinarily seasu
an
M
New
the
mak
break,
the
the
re
o
"TWIN BEDS" GOOD COMEDY.
"Twin Beds," a veristic and ingrati
ating exposition of the amazing and
amusing adventures of three married
couples, who are neighbors in one of
the fashionable tall
ings which abound
apartment build
n
in certain sections
in New York, filled the bill at Green
wood Theatre tonight.
In conformity with its title the
Sub
tor
scenes
of the play are laid in a sleeping cham
ber. The appearance there of
Italian tenor, in the bibulous
îmagi
an
cannon
disap
and
in
handl
Tal
Rogers
Mau
misap
prehension that it is his own instead of
his neighbor's, proves the situation
from which
the
a variety of ludicrous
complications result.
The play has won its popularity by its
wholesome story, its constant flash of
new slang and witty lines, and its ex
traordinary characterizations,
ally rare in farce.
gener
"Signora Monti," Amazonian wife
of an erratic tenor, is one of the most
amusing stage portraits ever made in
the local theatre.
scenes
out,
obser
play.
deftly
•o
Boyd Webb, Gordon Gillespie and
George Clark went over to Grenada
Sunday afternoon.
o
John Lindsey, representing the land
title department of the M. & O. R. R.
Co., was in Greenwood on business
Tuesday.
Cry
strug
of
the
the
-o
Mr. Abe Bernstein left Sunday for
Hot Springs, Aik., whare he will take
the splendid course of baths before vis
iting the Eastern and Northern
nets to buyhis summer stock of genta
furnishings.
mar
legal
-o
W.
Shell
Seed Sweet Potatoes.
"Nancy Hall" 1915 South Mississippi
Sweet Potato Seed. Disprove theory
that sweet potatoes won't endure ia
Delta. Phone 390. $1,00 per bushel.
S. L. McGINNIS.
John
Scbla
■o
Eggs for hatching.
White Leghorn and Partridge Wyan
dotte Eggs. Phone 390, $1.50 per set
ting.
from
S. L. McGINNIS.
o
business
of
the
Mothers who love your sons and
daughters, see "The. Battle Cry
Peace
Monday, Feb. 21st.
at the Greenwood Theatre,
» »
-o
middle
PECANS FOR SALE —- Choiea
pecans fifteen cents delivered. Ad
dress Mrs. Mamie Sample, Ebenezer,
Miss,
■O
and
of
busi
Practically new 1916 Ford Touring
Car with punefure proof tires for quick
aale at close' price. Apply to Kim
thrwgh Auto Co.

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