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Weekly graphic. [volume] (Kirksville, Adair Co., Missouri) 1880-1949, December 11, 1896, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066097/1896-12-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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WEEKLY
APHIC.
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1.00 PER ANNUivi
KIRKSVILLE, IVIISSOURI, FRIDAY, DECEMBER u,
1896
VOL. XVII NO 37
1
I i lk
JbL. Hk.
Kft-
THEHISTAKEN LETTER
CHAPTER III.
"And find something better. I
don't know jiibt what it is, but I
know that yon have it. I knew
that when I first saw you with
Miss Dwight. It was on the cars
as I came here. Her brightness
was like ,"
She stopped, flushing painfully.
"Would yon mind telling me what
you were going to say?" he asked
in a qnit way.
"It was like the sunshine that
comes after a storm. The sun
shine that falls upon many a wreck
and ruin, but is warm and sweet
I can't
tell you why
trembled
man and gently lay his hand on
her forehead.
She was near enough to hear all isn't that
he said, though he had not noticed think so.
her.
"No," she interrupted,
sweet face turned from him,
all the same
I felt this." Her voice
a little. She felt afraid.
"It was a little qiiner that y on
should, But isn't it a good thing
that the sun can shine for us after
a storm!" He laughed, tossing
back his fair hair. "It's a grand
thing to be glad and happy in
spite of the storm that wrecked
one's fondest hopes, little girl.
But how grave we have grown!"
She wondered if she had offended
him.
"1 must learn to speak more
thoughtfully," she said, her eyes
upon the floor.
"We shall all be sorry when yon
have mastered that lesson," he
said.
She laughed softly and left him.
Miss Dwight had called and had
sent for her.
"This is my charity day, Miss
Brown, and I called to ask if you
would make it endurable by going
the round with me "
"Oh, you know I visit the hos
pital to-day and distribute flower
and books to a lot of people who
are too sick or too stupid to can
for them. Still one has to do it,
of course. If you have'ntbeenr
might interest you, and it would
be actuual charity to me."
She laughed in her pretty way
Polly always enjoyed everything
beautiful.
"Aunt Ruth will decide. 1
thank jou, but I do not know hei
plans of the day,'' said Polly,
flushing a little.
"By all means, child, go, if yon
want to. And curry Borne flow
ers Is anything else needed to
day, Eloise!"
"I'm sine I haven't an idea,
dear Miss Ruth. I think that like
the daughters of horse leech they
eiy always for 'more,' but dare say
with the flowers we shall do.'
"And may I add a bottle of
Rnthie's best scuppernong wine to
the flower! Good morning, Eloise.
Yes, theie is a man who needs
just that particular wine, Ruthie.
I neant to ask you for it: and I
am just going over, so I shall see
you both theie," and Dr. Berkly
gathered up some papers and left
them.
The hospital was a small one
kept by the town. The doctor
gave free service and the ladie
formed a society and appointed
visiting and other committees.
Thoic wcic only two wards. One
One for men and one for women
and children. Sometimes thes'
were crowded.
Polly's face paled as she entered
the place. The sight of Buffering
gave her pain and she could not
forget heiself in thiuking of others.
Her heart was full of simple pity.
The pity that would have the pain
laken away. It was not in her
natuie to feel the deep sympathy
that in utter self forgetfuluess ac
tually bears the anguish with the
sufferer.
She looked about h r with wide,
frightened eyes, while her careless
companion scattered smiles and
flow ers and tracts, promiscuously.
Miss Dwight had never suffered,
and she took it for granted that
some people must be sick and
others "well just as some were shoi t
and others tau. bue lelt sorry,
in a general 6ort of way, that this
was so.
They were half through the first
first ward when Dr. Berkly came
in.
Polly saw him bend over the cot
of a grey haired, withered old wo-
"Are you feeling better to-day!'
he asked, kindly.
"Better! Well, not quite so
bad, may be, but bad enough. My
boy, 1 hope you may never be old
and poor and sick and friendless.'
"None of us are quite so bad as
that, you know. There is only
one way to be friendless. Indeed
I'm not sure that there is any way
at all," he said smiling.
Polly almost held her breath as
she saw the smile that lighted his
face.
"I know what yon mean, my
boy."
"Of course you do."
Polly watched him as he went
from cot to cot. Each patient in
terested him in a different way.
She could see that his whole soul
was in the work. And not only
as the physician is interested in
his patients the man of science
vorking out the difficult problems
skaling the secrets of nature,
but as brother is interested in
brother.
She found herself repeating 'And
his neighbor as himself." She
could not understand it, she could
only wonder and admire.
After awhile he came to her.
"You brought the wine? Thank
you. Piesently you shall see the
man who needs it so terribly. He
was hurt in an accident. He is a
preacher of some sort, and he has
a whole mountain of ereeds and
doctrine between himself and the
Father. But then it doesn't mat
ter in the long run, and he really
seems to taks a sort of comfort in
it.
He laughed a little as he lifted a
baby out of its bed.
"This little fellow begins to
know me, Harrold, though a fam
ily man, cannot touch it. He be
longs here, the baby you know.
His mother died. We don't know
his name, but it is easy work find-
innr nnp nnil wlinf' a in n iiflTiiol'
"fc V"-, ...... .. ...W M .... ..........
There, little man, you are getting
on.' He put the baby down ten
derly, and they went into the oth
er ward.
Miss Dwight, in her hurry to
finish the unpleasant work had
preceeded them. She was scat
tering flowers over the bed nearest
them, and as they drew nearer she
smiled down at the occupant and
held out a tract.
"It is the preacher," Dr. Berk
ly said laughing. "And I should
not wonder if the tract is from the
'sinner' package. They persist
in sending them, you know, and
seem to enjoy it. It is easy get
ting the worst ones away after
ward." Miss Dwight moved on.
The man on the flower strewn
cot lay quite still, his hands folded
and his eyes closed. Polly could
see that his face was thin and sol
emn and that his fingers were stiff
and freckled. Some instinct caus
ed her to stop, her eyes on the
pale face.
Dr. Berkley sat down beside him
and took one of the freckled hands.
The eyes opened at once.
With a low cry Polly drew back.
Dr. Bendy looked up at her,
and then quietly went to her. She
was trembling violently and her
face was white as death.
"Never mind," he said. "It
has been too much for you. You
must get in my carriage and go
home at once. Miss Dwight can
return alone. He beckoned to a
her
"it
1 mint not let you
It is the old trouble a
scrap from the old life. The
world is'a tiny place, Dr. Berkly,
and one can never really break off
from the past. I am so afraid of
offending Aunt Ruth. When I
used to know him.''
"Poor child. I think Ruthie
has set you a haul task, little one.
May I talk to her about it!'
"Oh, will you do that! Would
you dare!"
"I would do anything for you."
She looked up into his eyes, and
a great wave of unspeakable joy
swept across her soul.
And then he was saying in his
usual way:
"Miss Swinson is ready now."
"I am better now, and if yon
please I prefer walking home.
Miss Swinson will you say as
much to Miss Dwight!''
She was so white and small and
frail as she stood there before
them.
"No, you will go in my car
riage. I'll take you myself," Dr.
Berkley said, and together they
went down.
"I shall be so glad if aunt Ruth
ran be a little ," she began and
and stopped, hpidly knowing what
it was she wanted to say.
"Yes, I know," he said, button
ing down a loose curtain of the
Jgn
nurse.
"But you!"
"1 shall be all
with
now,
right. Go down
Miss Swinson, and let
me find you better wheu I get
home. The place won't seem like
home to me unless I find you theie
bright and well.'
"I am so sorry, but I I mean,
I can't help it." She faltered.
"Aes, I know. You arenot to
blame yourself. It isn't your
fault. It is only natural that a lit
tle thing like you should shrink
from pain. Nobody blames you
because your muscles are too deli
cate for lifting heavy weights, and
your nerves "
carriage. "I undci stand.''
"It is not the same as if he had
not died, and it was so long ago
so far in the past," she said in a
low voice.
He was standing beside her,
and she saw his face light up with
a sudden glow.
Wondering at this she sat silent
ly looking at him, and then he
stepped back and the carriage
whirled away.
She leaned back and drew a long
breath of almost perfect happi
ness How beautiful the world
was how glorious a thing it was
to live.
The carriage stopped under the
beautiful gold and crimson maples
that lined the streets in front of
the house, and she got out and
walked np the path between the
lows of feathery chrysanthemums.
It was iu June that she had come,
and now it was the beginning of
November.
Leaning against one of the great
white pillars of the vera'da she
saw a forlorn drooping figure. As
she drew nearer she saw that it
was a woman. She walked faster.
"Was there something that you
wanted!" Polly asked, for the
woman seemed to be turning away.
She lifted her face and looked at
the girl.
"Yes, but it's uo use. Some
how my coinage didn't hold out,
or niy pride lhtined up just at the
last"
"Have you been inside!"
"No. That is just it. I couldn't
ask admittance."
"Did you want to see the Doc
tor! I'm sorry he is not here.
Are you sick!"
"Yes I'm sick, but it was not
the Doctor I came to see. I want
ed to see Sliss Bascom."
"And were you refused!"
"I didn't even ring the bell.''
"Then come in with me. Miss
Bascom will see you. Sue is gen
tle and good. You need not be
afraid of her.'' Polly's voice tas
full of pity.
"You are sorry for me you
pity me!"
"Yes, and she will. Come with
me."
Polly opened the door and the
woman followed her in She led
the way to a small room at the
side or the hall.
Wait here jn3t a little while,"
Bhe said.
"Stop. Won't you tell her,
won't you plead lor me! Yon are
young and sweet aad good. Oh,
you are happy and life is full of
joy to you. Will you help me!"
The woman had thrown back
her veil, and Polly saw her face
fully. Once she 11 nst have been
beautiful. Her eyes were dark,
w ith heavy, long fringed lids, but
there were deep lines about them.
Tae face looked sadly worn and
faded.
"I don't know what you want,"
said Polly. p
"I wrote to her Bixlmonths ago
and a3ked her to helpline. It was
hard to do, for I kneWjthe Bascom
pride. I have it myBelf, and she
did not answer myjetter. Now I
have come to her. JYbu go and
tell her. Beg her to let me stay.
Tell her I am poor and homeless.
But I am a Bascom too, and if she
says no, if she sendaiyou back to
tell me that, I will go away and
die, for I shall never'approach her
again, never. She has known of
my terrible need. If bhe turns me
off now, I will never .return. Go
and tell her so." .
"Bnt who are you! What am
I to say!" Polly looked at her
with great, wondering eyes, half
afraid of the terrible passion in
her white, suffering face.
"Who am I! Ah; who. I was
a vain, pleasure-loving, woman. I
I did what thousands of others
do. I married a low, common
man for the sake of his handsome
face! A love marriage, forsooth
And my heart they will live on.
But you need not know the story.
I am a divorced wife! A woman
cast off. But I am a Bascom, the
daughter of Miss Bascom's own
sister, Alice Brown. Have you
never heard of me! The one black
sheep in the spotless flock. I am
Mary Brown, now that I have
taken my own name. She will
know.
The woman stopped short. Pol
ly had fallen weak and white to
the floor.
"There, you are going to faint
at the very sound of my name.
You can't breathe the same air
with me."
"No, I shall not faint," Polly
said, struggling to her feet and
sinking back upon the sofa.
"And you are Mary Brown.
Miss Bascom's niece.''; She leaned
forward and looked with great,
miserable eyes at ttiewoman be
fore her. "Yes7T unTthatwf nl
creature. The woman who made
a grave mistake, and who has
and scorn me, I can't, I cin't. II
must send her away. No one will
ever know."
She got up and bathe 1 her face,
and then went quietly down the
staiis. She hesitated for a mo-
Electric Bitters.
Electric Bitters is a medicine
suited for any season, but per
haps more generally needed when
the liver is torpid and sluggish
and the need of a tonic and altera-
ment as she reached the hall and j tiveis felt
while she stood there the
door opened and Dr. Berkley en
tered. He came toward her,
smiling.
"I'm afraid yoiuare not look-1
ing umch better," he said. "You
must leave the hospital to the
A nrnmnh nse nf rhi
, .. .V, ..J ... . J,. ...,.,
fiont medicinen has oiten averted long
suffered for it. Did it ever occur
to you that I might have been
more sinned against than sinning!"
"I -I never heard of it I ."
The woman laughed.
"Certainly not. I ought to have
known that much. But you go
now to"! Miss Bascom. Tell her
what I have told you. I shall
never trouble her again. Close
the door. I shall rest and wait.
You may have to plead long."
Polly staggered out, closing the
door behind her.
She crept np to her room, and
sat down. She understood it all
now. Miss Bascom had written
to her niece the woman down
stairs the letter went astray and
came to her.
The girl' b face was white and
hard as she sat there thinking it
all out. They had believed her
i"r a r fiTTfrTtntl rrtitn o tinntrlnou
pleasure-loving woman, and this
was very awful in Miss Bassom's
sight. Polly could understand
that.
And now she must let tl em
know! Must she give it all up
the beautiful life that she loved
the friends who were so dear to
her!"
She got up and walked about
the room, touching the various
articles that made it pretty and
home like, as a mother touches
the garments of her dead child.
"I can't do it, oh, Ican't! They
love me so, and I am so happy
here. How can I go away?"
She threw herself upon the bed
in the agony of weeping.
And then the tempter came.
Why not go down and send this
poor woman away! It would be
better for Miss Bascom better for
herself. She could give the woman
money her purse was always
well filled. j
She sat up, the light of hoped iu
her eyes.
"l couiu senu ner money as
she needs ic. That is what she
wants. No one would ever know,
and I could live here and be hap
py How can I bear to let him
know that I have been an Oh, I
can not do it. He would hate im
regul.ir committee. I can't have
you like this again."
Polly's heart sent a warm flood
to her face. Shefoigoteverythiug,
in her great joy. The look iu his
eyes the tone of his voice even
the simple words to"d the won
drous story.
"But I must hurry on I stop
ped to see you. Won't you go to
sleep now? I ran up with Ruthie
down town. She was going to see
a friend who has just arrived
from somewhere, and I shall not
be back until after dark. And then
for awhile I intend to forget all
my sick people. Where shall I
find you, little girl!''
Theie was no mistaking him
now.
"I I,'' slip lifted her shy, hap
py eyes to his face, and then she
remembered, and stopped.
"You mean that I must look for
you. I think I shall know where
you aie. Ah, little girl, how glad
I am that you came to us."
He went away then and left
her, and the stood quite still in
the beautiful hall after lie had
gone. Suppose he hadkiMwn the
secret that lay hidden behind that
closed door? Suppose ho knew.
A sudden tiemor passed over
her.
"How he would despise me. I
should be unwoithy then if I did
this thing. But how cm I ex
plain ? At least E can do right.
That is what he would do."
- She" crept upstahs againnnd
took off the pretty gown she wore,
replacing it with the suit she had
worn on that summer night that
seemed to have gone so far away
into the past.
She packed a little traveling
bag and took part of the money
from her purse.
Then she looked about her with
wide, dry eyes, and left the room.
The wo nan was waiting patient-
iy.
"lean see that her answer was
no," she said wearily.
"You are mistaken. I have not
seen Miss Bascom. She has gone
out. But I know that she will
welcome you If jon leave the
door ppen you can see her when
she comes in."
That was all she could say. She
left the 100111, and let herself out
of the house.
At the gate the maple leaves
showered down upon her. With
out looking back she went on
down the street.
to be continued."
and perhaps fatal bilious fevers.
No medicine will act more sure
Iy in counteracting and free
ing the system from the malarial
poison. Headache, indigestion,
constipation, dizziness yield to
Electric Bitters. 50c. and 81.00
per bottle at B. F. Henry's drug
store
WANTED Faithful men ok
women to travel for responsible
established house in Missouri.
Salary 8780 and ex envs. Posi
tion permanent. References. En
clitic self iiddressed stamped en
velope. The National, Star In
surance Bldg., Chicago, III.
HENRY B. PURL,
OHNfVST,
HAVING NATURAL TEETH A SPECI
ALTY. OFFICE OVER NORMAL
BOOKSTORE.
KIRKSVILLE,
MISSOURI.
JOHN W. TURNER, n. D.
Physician and Surgeon,
Thirty year experience In Private and Hospital
practice.
OFFICE Over Union Bank. Careful and pronp
attention given to all professional business.
TELEPHONE NO. m. KIRKSVILLE. MO
11
A. P. WILLA1ID,
Physician and Surgeon,
Continues the practice In all the branches of thai
profession. Treatment cf Chronic diseases au4 In
juries a specialty bv the aid of Electro-magnetism.
OFFICE North slJe of public square; hours 9 to is
a. m ; a to 5 p. m ; residence one block south oa
Franklin street. No. tot.
Half Rates Plus S2.00.
DR. G) A. GOBES
DR. G. H. NtCHOL
35UKLINGTON ROUTE.
To the West and Northwest,
Nov. 3, 17th, December 1st and
15th, lound trip, 20 days limit,
to Nebraska, Kansas, Wyoming,
Utah, Black Hills and certain
parts of Colorado. Splendid
through trains of chair cars (seat:
fiee) and handsome compartment
observation vestibule sVfp.-i
Only dining car line to Denver,
via St. Louis and Kansas City,
cafe plan (pay only for what you
order). The Burlington Route is
the original Harvest Excursion
line. See the magnificent corn
crops of Nebraska. Send to the
undersigned for pamphlets on
Missouri and Nebraska, and con
local agent for rates and train
service. L. W. Wakeley,
General Passenger Agent.
St? Louis, Mo.
DRS. GOBEN & NICHOLS
Physicians and Surgeons
Office Second Floor Goben Bulldln;
O. W. AVERi-
EOLECTIC PHYSICIAN
He will give special attention to the treatment o
chronic diseases. Office in rear of Unicn bank
Office hours 8 ;oa m to 12 ooanii p m to 530? m
W. C. CARTER, D.D.S.,
SUCCESSOR TO
DR. J. H. CARTER
OFFICE UP STAIRS SOUTH SIDE.
KIRKSVILLE, MO.
CHARLES H. LEE,
DEALER IN
MARBLE : AND : GRANITE
X0XUHENTS
All kinds of Cemetery Work. Opposite Masonic
Hall. Kirksville. Mo.
J. C. STORM.
Notary Public
A. U EVAN
0. K. B AUREUS
Do all work in the barber's line:
also JadieB hair dressing.,, ,f t
They make professional ea'ls at'
the homes of the ill aud afflicted
any day except Satuiday
Singeing done equal to the finest
work in cities. Give them a trial;
it will be appreciated.
First Door North of the Postof fice
WILLIA3L PARKS
i! J 1 re a Cold in One D ay
Take laxative Bromo Quinine tab
lets. All druggists refund the
monev. if it fails to cure. 25c. For
sale by B. F. Henry.
STORM & EVANS
KnOHKEYS RT "LRW
KIRKSVILLE - - - MISSOURI.
Office First International bank buildlnc.
R. R. DUNKIN, LL. B.,
sei-
"RtxoYney'aTSaw?
Hotary "Public
Office over Union bank.
Kirksville. Mlssoutl
A positive guarantee to cure or
money refunded will be found
with each $1.00 box or bottle of
Dr. Sawyer's Family Care or
Pastilles manufactured after this
date. Ward & Finley.
WANTED Faithful jien or
women to travel for responsible
established house in Missouri.
Salary S780 and expenses. Posi
tion permanent. Reference. En
close self-addressed stamped en
velope. The National, Star In
surance Bldg., Chicago, 111.
Stands at the Head.
A. J. Bogel, the leading drug
gist of S.reveport, La., says: "Dr.
King's New Discoveiy is the on'
thing that cure? my cough, and it
is the best seller I have." J. F.
Campbell, merchant of Sta.fford,
Ariz., wiites: Dr. King's New
Discovery is all that is churned
for it; it never fails, and is a sure
cine for consumption, coughs and
colds. I cannot s;iy enough for its
meiits." Dr. King's New Dis
covery for consumption, coughs
and colds is not an experiment.
It has been tried for a quarter of
a century, and to-day stands at
the head. It never disappoints.
Fiee tiial bottles at B. F. Henry's
drug store.
Bucklen'd Arnaca Salve.
The best salve in the world for
cuts, bruises, sores, ulcers, salt
rheum, fever soies, tetter, chapped
hands, chilblains, corns, and all
skin eruptions, aud iositively
cures piles, or no pay required. It
is guarranteed to give perfect sat
isfaction, or money refunded. Price
2oc per box. For sale by B F
Henry's drngsron;.
School books at Fout&. McChes
ney's
1 was not able to wait upon my
self fnr four ypars, and I want to
thank God and Dr. Sawyer for
his wonderful Pastilles and ad
vise all suffering ladies to use
them. Mrs. P. Dorr, Clayton, N.
Y. Ward & Finley.
To Cure a Coldtfn One Day
Take laxative Bromo QuiniLe
tablets. All druggists refund the
money, if it fails to cure. 25c. For
Sale by B. F. Henry.
I suffered for thirty jears with
Rheumatism and had tried every
thing. Dr. Sawyer's Family Cure
cured me. Mrs. C. Young, Meno
minie, Wis. Ward & Finley
P. F. Greenavood,
ATTOIWEY M kSJH.
KIRKSVILLE MO.
Office np stalr In Ivle Block.
E. S. QUINN,
Physician and Surgeon.
KIRKSVILLE, AlO.
OFFICE WITH DR. AVERY REAR OK
UNION BANK.
A. DONEQHY,
ATTOiMEY-M'-LAW
KIRKSVILLE, VO.
OFFICE ON EAST SIDE OVER COLl.'d
HARDWARE STORE.
M. MACH1N, M. D.
Diplomate in Osteopathy
IS PERMANENTLY" LOCATED AT
KEOKUK, - - IOWA
HAS BEEN IN ACTIVE PRAC
TICE FOR OVER THREE YEAR.
TREATS
0STE0FATHICALLY
AND
MEDICINALLY
ALL CASES.
Parties not treated by the month or week.
Charges $1.00 per taeatment. Good lady assis
tant gives close personal attention to all lady pa
ents.
M. MACHIN, M. D.,
129 North Ninth St. Keokuk, To.
THE ENDOPATH INSTITUTE
WANTED Faithful men or
women to travel for responsible
established house in Missouri.
Salary S7S0 and expenses. Posi
tion permanent. Reference. En
close self-addressed stamped en
veloped. The National, Star In
surance Bldg., Chicago, III.
Treatment Free.
Dr. Fnlkerson, the Endopath,
devotes Thursday of each week to
the treatment of patients who re-
slue in anair county anu are
without money, free of charge.
!K. FULKEUSOX,
MANAGER AND OPiiRA'liR.
TREATMENT IN HARMONY WITH
THE LAWS OF NATURE. ,ITK! H
WITHOUT THE ASSISTANCE
OK DRUGS.
Thr effect of a drug adulnlsterel without idaila
3terliijrtie Jruff. Itself, office and part-is over
postofctr. rooms 4 and ;. Hours Genii rata.
m. tor n. Ladles aid Children from t to jp. s
Visits by special appointment j to 3 m C .so t
DR. VANSICKLE
15 a good mm
OPTICIAN.
WITH THOMAS JE.WEI.RY HOUSE
KIRKSVILLE, MO.
:
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