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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, December 02, 1908, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1908-12-02/ed-1/seq-3/

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UNIVERSITY M1SSOURIAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1908.
m
PLANS EXTENSION
IN HORTICULTURE
State Board Decides it Will
Issue Elementary Text
Books.
WINTER INSTITUTE IN JANUARY
DOWNTOWN APARTMENT FOR WHICH
STUDENTS BUILT OWN FURNITURE
Wc desire the public to know that we carry a large line p!
Staple and Fancy Groceries
(Sanitary) and invite a trial
Ripe Olives
Plum Pudding
Mandarines
Tangerines
Apple Butter
Reports to Be Made Then on
Result of the Fruit
Investigation.
Malaga Raisins
Bananas
Figs'
Lettuce
Celery
At a meeting of the Missouri State
Bo.ud of Horticulture held in the Hor
ticulture building yesterday morning
and afternoon, the dates for the an
nual winter institute were .set for Jan.
f. ti, 7, and S. at Columbia.
The winter institute is the most im
portant of the two annual meetings
lii-Id by the state board. A program
lia- been arranged.
Thins were made to send lessons in
Horticulture to the country schools.
The-e le-xnis will be elementary in
character as the text books now in
u-e in this department are too dilli
fiilt for Mich purpose, according to W.
L. Howard, secietary of the board.
Canvass of Schools.
A c:mass to determine the number
of schools, interested is now being
made. Next spring the texts probably
vill be printed. The delay is caused by
lack of funds. Work along somewhat
different lines will be carried on in
the city schools.
A plan to encourage school gardening
in the small towns was discussed.
Tribes will be offered by prominent
nursery men. Preliminary reports
iere made by delegates sent by the
Loard to remote parts of the United
States to study Horticultural condition-.
This work was begun last fall.
Fruit Reports in January.
Kxperts investigated the fruit growing
conditions principally in the north
west and the Georgia peach belt. Com
plete reports will be given on these
matters at the January meeting.
A committee was appointed to visit
the apple show at Council Bluffs to
procure additional exhibitors for the
fruit display in January, when $300
in cash premiums will be offered for
the best fruits displayed here.
The following members were present:
V. T. Stark, president; It. M. Hitt,
first vice-president; J. II. Christian,
second vice-president; T. II. Todd, trea
surer; "W. L. Howard, secretary; Dr. J.
C. Whitten, professor of horticulture,
University of Missouri; C. II. Dutcher,
AVarrensburg, and L. C. Wilson, St.
Joseph.
NOWELL'S
HHBIHHHHHHIHiHIHHHHHMHD0EiK
riiHrjiHIWnrj -
Dressed Turkeys ?
Geese
Ducks
Chickens
Rabbits
Ribs
Backbones
Sausage
Butter
Eggs, &c
PHONES 74
T
FOOTBALL POSTER READY
Souvenir Will Be Placed on Sale Here
Tomorrow.
A beautiful Missouri football poster
will be put on sale tomorrow in the
corridors of the Law, Engineering and
Academic buildings. It is a large
poster, size 14 by 22 inches, with a
large football in old gold and black.
This is something new at Missouri and
makes a pretty souvenir.
The publishers say they arc assured
of a large run, though the supply is
limited. Dr. Hetherington and Coach
Monilaw pronounce the poster excel
lent. In order to show appreciation of the
work done by the football coach and
members of the team, the publishers
have given each a copy of the poster.
HltEE students of the University
of Missouri, who have soIed the
boardinj; house problem bv estab
lishing an apartment over a business
house at 19a Xorfh Eighth street, built
the furniture for the rooms, consisting
of a fifteen-foot bench, a study table,
a Morris chair, and" a Itook case.
The bench and chair are well up
holstered, this also being the work of
the three men. Resides these, there are
several useful ornaments around the
room, among them a pipe rack, with
about twenty-five pipes in it. A bowl
of their own "Scotty-Jarman Mixture"
sets upon the table.
The three students are G. Sam Scott,
all-Junior president; E. A. Jarman, a
law student; and C. W. Mullen! v.
Several other ornaments are relics
b the l"nierity of Mioir.-i in the
Ail.:ui".i MisMiuii debate of ISUtl;
one. a sword th.it went through Phil
ippine campaigns and was present at
lie captuie of Aguin.ihlo. Several picture-
"with histories'' are hanging up n
the wall-, beside many significant pen
nants. The young men will have the bed
room completely furnished before the
e.ir i- gone, -intl are contemplating add
ing anoth.-r loom to the suite next year.
In these, the "Waldorf Apartments,"
as they are called, the students are free
from the troublesome rule of the land
lady, and can entertain their friends at
The original idea was not, how
ever, siitigesttd solely by the hoarding
'lou-e problem. Seeral organiza
tion- had trouble finding meeting
p'aies. 'lhe-e organizations are the
Quo Vadis Club, the Tack to Nature
Club, and the (hen board. All
these now meet in the "Waldorf Apart
ments" through the kindness of the
proprietors, one of whom belongs to the
three. Since the apartments have liecn
opened, a fourth club has been added to
the li-t. the Roughneck Glee Club,
which meets each Friday at 10:30.
Members of the Quo Vadis Club gather
there at 12 p. m., the thirteenth day of
:inv time with onlv the night watch- each month. At the same hour on the
l.ian to fear. One of the men is espe
cially benefited bv this convenience.
since former work on a raiiroau litis
One is the cord from the pennant won caused him to be wakeful at night.
third Saturday of each month the Hack
to Nature Club is called to order. The
Oven board alone meets in the daytime
at 2:30 p. in. each third Sunday.
STUDENTS START
FUND FOR DR. ELIOT
Geo. D. Markham, St. Louis,
Member of Committee
to Raise Money.
St. Louis Jeweler Here.
(. W. Morris, of Mermod & Jaccard
& King. St. Louis, is in Columbia vis
iting the University and colleges, show
ing school and class pins and jewelry.
He is also showing the latest ideas
in copper plate engraving for society
and personal cards, invitations and an
nouncements. Mr. Morris will be in
the parlors of the Hotel Gordon
Wednesday and Thursday.
Exhibition of Copley Prints at Harshe's
On Thursday, Dec. 3, Harshe's will
have on exhibition the celebrated Cop
ley Trints which arc the finest made.
They are worth seeing and you should
ly all means see them during the week
1-eginning with Dec. 3. Everylody in
a ited.
Dr. John H. Wright Dead.
Dr. John H. Wright, professor of
Greek at Harvard and Dean of the
Graduate School, died at Cambridge
Nov. 25 of heart disease. He was born
in Persia. Sept. 4, 1852. a son of a
missionary, and was graduated from
Dartmouth in 1S73.
Oriental Bazaar.
Antique brasses for sale at the Ori
ental bazaar which opens Thursday
evening in the Auditorium of Academic
Hall.
CAMBRIDGE, Ma-s., Dec. 2. It is the
intention of those Harvard graduates
who have taken the initiative in raising
the Charles William Eliot fund, in rec
ognition of his two score years of ser
vice to the college and university, to
conduct the subscription with as little
publicity as possible. They feel that
it is essentially a matter between the
graduates, and that in order to make
the subscription general it is better
not to publish information concerning
amounts subscribed. They desire that
contributions be voluntary and include
the largest possible number of gradu
ates. For this reason F. L. Iligginson, '(53,
who is the receiver of the subscriptions,
was unwilling to make any definite
statement today at his office, 50 State
street. He said that not all the cir
culars had yet been sent out to gradu
ates. Unless the plans are changed
there will be no statement of the fund
until next spring, when at Commence
ment it is likely that the committee
which has charge of raising the fund
will make a report to the graduates.
The detailed work of the fund commit
tee is being done through the office
of the alumni association.
The plan is to raise as large a fund as
the graduates care to give and to incst
the money, paying the income to Presi
dent and Mrs. Eliot during their lives.
Afterward the fund will be disposed
of in accordance with the wishes of
Tresident Eliot. The committee in
charge is as follows: Charles Francis
Adams. 'S3, of Boston; Alexander Agas
siz, '55. of Cambridge; Joseph H.
Choate, '52. of New York; T. Jefferson
Coolidge, 50, of Boston; F. A. Delano,
S5, of Chicago; Charles S. Fairchild.
'03, of New York; Austen G. Fox, '09,
of New York; If. II. Turness, '88. of
Philadelphia; Augustus Hemenway, '75.
of Boston; F. L. Iligginson, '03vof Bo
ton; George Iligginson, Jr., '87, of Chi
cago; Gardiner M. Lane, '81, of .Boston:
William Lawrence, '71. of Boston;
Henry C. Lodge, '71, of Washington;
George D. Markham. 'Si. of St. Louis;
James T. Mitchell, '55, of, Philadelphia;
Simon Newcomb, '58, of Washington.
EF
UND
B ETUBECUL
Succeeds in Twenty Out of
Forty Cases in
Chicago.
CHICAGO. Dec. 2. A new treatment
for tuberculosis of the bones, discovered
by Dr. Emil Beck, of this city, has
had a trial of five weeks at the Home
for Crippled Children, and the results
are said to have been remarkable.
The .treatment, which promises to
bring relief to a large percentage of
sufferers from this form of the great
white plague, is simplicity itself and
consists for the most part of filling the
cavity caused by the disease with a
metallic substance, bismuth subnitrate,
combined with a basis of vaseline.
The discovery was incidental to tak
ing an X-ray photo of a little invalid.
The solution was applied to fi the out
line of a tubercular abscess and beiii'.'
left in the cavity, proved a healing
agent. Dr. Beck told his discovery to
Drs. John Ridlon and Wallace B!jn
chard, at the Home for Destitute Crip
pled Children and, in a five-weeks' trial,
twenty out of forty crippled children
were cured by the treatment.
The formula contains thirty grams of
bismuth subnitrate. combined with sixty
grains of vaseline. The paste so formed
is solid at the temperature of the body,
but if a fever is induced, will run o:;i
of the cavity. As the healing continues
the mixture is absorbed.
Medical men estimate that fully 5o
per cent of all crippled children are suf
fering from tubercular disorders.
ELITE
THEATER
Programme Today
Love Laughs at Locksmith
Captured by Phone
Students' Jokes
Haunted Castle
We Cater to Ladies and Children
rnHE Newlyweds and their kid
and everybody else eat
Nadja Caramel Chocolates
and Pin Money Gum Drops
Made by the
BlankeWenneker Co.
On sale fresh
every day at
THE CO-OP.
FRATERNITY EMBLEMS-
Of any style and design on Porcelain Sharing Mugs,
suitable for
HOLIDAY GIFTS
We offer a line of High Grade Imported and Domestic TOILET SOVEir
TIES, embracing Manicure Sets, Hair Jtrushes, Combs, Shaving Sets, Sharing
Mirrors, Razor Strops and Traveling Rolls.
Mail Orders Have Prompt Attention
KOI1EN
BARBERS SUPPLY
ST. LOUIS 1
CO.
Self Indexing Ledgers
JM
.(f-otepWirs
That annually save In labor 900 to 2000
of cost. Made In both loose leaf and
bound. Samples free. Address, Dept. S
IM KDGI STErlEiSCOHrAJfT. JeSetsM Ofr. M
SCHWOCITS TRANSFER
Phone 34
No. 9a
Room 1
SoutK 8th St.
Solicits your Baggage, Bus,
Cab and Trunk Business
KODAK WORK
IN TODAY AND OUT TOMORROW
WALLER
PHOTOGRAPHER
OVER THC ROCHESTER
University of Missouri
Law Department
-tfiruittttititmiKi nitttimimtitiiti ttHwuiuw t tttitiniituittiiuimitiuiiiniHiiiMiit tntittr
To Prosecute Journalists.
The attorney general of Nebraska
has given out the names of twenty
newspapermen in that state who are to
be prosecuted by the state railway
commission under the anti-discrimination
clause of the commission act for
holding Western Union Telegraph
franks. Among those on the li-t are
Victor Roewater, publisher of the
Omaha Bee. and Gilbert M. Hitchcock,
publisher of the Omaha World-Herald.
Educators Choose Denver.
Denver has leen selected as the
meeting place of the National Educa
tional Association of 1909. The date
chosen is Julv 5 to 9.
R9f afi "mSMeV VV"
FIRST-CLASS EXCLUSIVE
I CONFECTIONERY V STORE I
j 16 South 9th St. I
t
COLUMBIA
BUSINESS
COLLEGE
COLUMBIA, HO.
6000 POSITIONS
AWAIT our Bookkeeper,
Bankers, tenographers.
Penman, and specially
rs. Within five block of the State. Univernltr.
unexcelled facultr. Tuorotichcoorwu. Excellent
equipment. FirrrarrH Year. Splendid library
Opportunities for boy and eirts to ork their way .
W rite today for particulars a ddrxss.
Ge o.H.Br asley.l'rrs. , Colmul.ln.Mo. .
Y. W. C. A. Benefit.
Don't forget the Oriental Bazaar Dec.
3 and 4 for the benefit of the Y. W. C.
A. house fund, in the Auditorium.
Course of three years leading to degree
of Bachelor of Laws.
Instruction is given by lectures, study
of text-books and case-books. There are
five resident professors of Law and ten non
resident lecturers lawyers eminent at the
Bar and on the Bench of the State.
The Practice Court gives the student
opportunity to become familiar with the
methods of conducting cases in court and is
a popular branch of the Law course.
The Law Library of over thirteen thou
sand volumes is open to all Law students.
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