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University Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1908-1916, May 24, 1914, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066313/1914-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

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Take
University
Snap-Shots
Kodaks are a part
ofyour school life. They
tire not expensive. We
have them from $2.00
up. Folding pocket Ko
daks at $5.
THE DRUG SHOP
The Home of
the 4(JSdi) in
Columbia
SPLIT MCKEL BARBER SHOP
F. C. GARRETT, Proprietor.
Shaves at cost 10c
Shampoo 20c
All Tonics 10c
Gloor Shampoo 45c
Massages 20c
4 First-Class Workmen.
No. 10 South 8th St. Miller Bldg.
lisi
Is Your Friend a
Graduate?
Here is a suggestion for a pleas
ing gift: Two beautiful hair
brushes set in genuine Ebony or
Parisian Iory just as you
choose with your friend's mon
ogram engraved on both.
Or. better yet, a complete toilet
or manicure outfit in leather
cases or roles. (Xo charge for
engraving)
To get an idea of the high
character of these gifts, and of
the large variety, see them in
my window.
Commencement
Horse Show
June 1 and 2
2:00 to 6:00 P. M.
Over 200 entries in the 30 events. Horses
from all the leading stables in the state.
Miss Loula Long will personally show her
String of Prize Winners Horses that have
won all over the United States and Canada.
General Admission 50c
Season tickets for the two days . . SI. 00
Box of eight seats ..... $15.00
Automobile Stalls ...- $2.00
plus general admission.
Application for Boxes to Be Made
Monday, May 25
Regular sale starts Tuesday,
May 26, at 8. p. m.
All seats on sale at Missouri Store and
Drug Shop.
TOTAL $100 PRIZES
Contest Is Open to All Stu
dents in the College of
Agriculture.
GRAND PRIZE VASE
There Will Be Individual
Rewards for Those Mak
ing High Scores.
A hundred dollars in prizes for grain
judging is offered to agricultural stu
dents, through J. c. llackleman. In
structor in Agronomy. The contest is
open to all students in the College of
Agriculture. Those who won prizes
last year will not be allowed to com
pete for the same prizes this year.
The total possible score for all classes
will be 2.000 points, divided as fol
lows: corn, COO points; commercial
grading, COO points; wheat, 400 points.
Fifty percent will be allowed for
placing, thirty percent for reasons and
twenty percent for answers to ques
tions.
The grand prize is a vase, eighteen
inches high, worth $2.r, with the win
ner's name carved on it. It is offered
by the Missouri Corn Growing Asso
ciation. The reserve grand prize, a
silver vase worth $15, is offered to the
student winning the second highest
score. The third grand prize is a sil
ver vaso worth $10.
Individual prizes also are offered.
For the highest score in corn, a solid
gold watch fob, worth $15, is offered
by the Kansas City Hoard of Trade;
for the highest score in commercial
grading, a solid gold watch fob worth
$15, is offered by the St. Louis Grain
Exchange; for the highest score in
Gifts for
Graduates
HENNINGER'S
813 Broadway
UKIVEBSITT MISSOUBIAK.
wheat judging, a gold watch fob, worth
$10 is offered by the Pierce Publish
ing Co., I)es Moines, Iowa; for the
highest score in oat judging, a gold
watch fob worth $10, is offered by the
Crop Improvement Committee of Mis
souri. F. O. Duley won the grand prize
last year, Chester Matheny the re
serve grand prize, W. W. Fuqua the
third grand prize, J. D. Blackwell the
corn judging contest, L. Moomaw the
commercial grading contest, L. N.
Graves the wheat judging contest and
V. It. Wilson the oat judging con
test.
J. C. llackleman organized these
contests last year and forty-four stu
dents tried for prizes. All students
wishing to enter should see Mr. Hack
leman before noon Friday. The con
test will be held in the basement of
the the Agricultural Building Satur
day. THE JIOUXBS AS A STAGE
Ben (.'net and His Players to Appear
In Open Air Plays.
Bsn Greet and his Woodland Play
ers will stage their out-of-doors plays
on the University campus north of the
Columns. The mounds will he the
lieu Greet
stage and the Columns, banked with
green boughs, will serve as a back
ground. The company will present "A Mid
summer Night's Dream." "She Stoops
to Conquer," and "The Tempest." Per
formances will be given Friday night.
May -9 and Saturday afternoon and
night. May P.O. Tickets will be on sale
tomorrow.
The Bsn Greet players have visited
Columbia before, but this year, for the
first time, Ben Greet himself will be
seen. Mr. Greet is the originator of
the open-air play, given without com
plex stage settings. He has appeared
at every university and college In the
United States, Canada and England in
the last twenty-s'ven years. Last
summer he played on the White House
grounds in Washington and was high
ly praised by President Wilson.
S. K. Z. (JIVES FIRST BANQUET
E.L. OhtIioImt Was Toustmaster at
Horticultural Fraternity's Dinner.
The first annual banquet of Sigma
Kappa Zeta, an honorary horticultu
ral fraternity, was held Wednesday
night at Mrs. Robinson's place oiF
Broadway. The fraternity has thir
teen active and seven honorary mem
bers, li L. Overholser was toastmas-
ter. Toasts were responded to by J.
C. Whitten, F. B. Mumford, W. L. How
ard, II. F. .Major. W. G. Wctstein and
W. B. Heller.
A chapter of this fraternity was re
cently installed at the University of
Nebraska. Petitions from four other
schools are being considered.
"Made-in-Columbia"
Chocolates
All Our
Milk-Chocolates
Chocolate Marshmallows
Chocolate Caramels
Cream Centers, etc.
30c POUND
All Our
Nut Candies
Chocolate Almonds
Pecans and Filberts
60c POUND
fiintfi5-Bdwy'
the candy store on
the corner
iyvfe
SUNDAY, MAY 2J, 1911.
CLASS OF 1914 HAS
WON MANY HONORS
Seniors Prominent in Ath
letic, Fraternal and Other
Student Activities.
ABOUT 475 MEMBERS
Nearly Every School and De
partment Shows Steady
Increase.
The class of 1914, approximating
47fs is the largest graduating class the
University has ever had. A material
increase is shown in most of the dif
ferent schools and departments. In
the College of Arts and Sclejice there
are 17fi candidates for graduation. A
few of these have already completed
their requirements. These candidates
will receive the degree of Bachelor of
Arts.
Seventy-four seniors are candidates
for the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Education. Of these many have ap
plied for life certificates in teaching.
Twenty-six have applied for the two
year certificate.
In the School or Engineering there
are 63 candidates for tha various dit
grees. Seventeen are candidates for
the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Civil Engineering: 12 for the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical
Engineering: 22 for the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Elec'rical En
gineering; 2 for the degree of Bache
lor of Science in Chemical Engineer
ing: 2 for the degree of Mechanical
Engineer; 1 foe the degree of Civil En
gineer, and 7 for the degree of Electri
cal Engineer.
Agriculture Has IN Largest Class.
Twenty-five seniors are candidates
for the degree of Bachelor of Laws.
There are 22 candidates for the degree
of Bachelor of Journalism. Seventeen
seniors will receive a two-year med
ical certificate from the School of Med
icine. There are 7C candidates for the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Ag
riculture, the largest class ever grad
uated from the College of Agriculture.
Two students from far eastern coun
tries will be graduated, Hiromi
Tschuydu, a Japanese, from the Col
lege of Arts and Science and Oong
Hyen Tsang, a Chinese, from the Col- (
lege of Agriculture. -
Honors in various stock shows have
been won by members of the 1914 class
in agriculture. This year's Farmers'
Fair, given by the senior agricultural
students, was the most successful .
since the Fair was started eight years I
ago.
Some of the Atlileles. I
A number of 1914 students have
achieved success in athletics.
"Chuck" Wilson, Gallagher, Kemper.
McWilliams and Moore were the stars !
of the champion Missouri Valley foot
ball team. In basketball Bernet cap
tained the team. Next year the Uni
versity of Missouri students will miss
many familiar faces in the track meets, j
Thatcher, captain, Hutsell. .Moss ami
Terry are last year men. In baseball
Hall, captain, Angerer, Woolsey. and
Gray are the 1914 representatives.
The class of 1914 has contributed
generously to the honor fraternities,
debating societies, student organiza
tions, and the student activities in
general.
The officers of the senior class are
John F. Ithoades, president: C. W.
Pollock, vice-president: F. K. Deaton.
treasurer; Mabel Hurst, secretary;
and Hazel Summerfield, historian.
A fountain, to be placed in the new
library building, will be the memorial
for the class of 1914. A sketch has
been submitted by James II. Jamison,
of St. Louis. The fountain will be
made of marble and will be placed on
a pilaster in the wall. Directly in
front of the fountain will be the west
stairway. At the top or the stairway
stained glass windows will throw dif
ferent lights on the fountain. It is
suggested by the class of 1914 that the
following class of 1915 place a simi
lar fountain at the east stairway.
WICK" IX A TKACK POSTER
Former .Missouri Star Used to Adter
tlse Meet.
"I wonder If it's Nick."
"It looks like Nick."
"Sure it's Nick."
And it is Nick. Posters advertising
the annual Missouri Valley Conrer
ence track and field meet, to be held
on Francis Field. Washington Univers
ity, St. I.ouis. Saturday, May 30, bear a
very lile-like picture or the former
Missouri track captain. John P. Nich
olson. The illustration, which Is labeled
"The Varsity Comet," portrays Nich
olson in the air Immediately above a
hurdle. Several of the posters have
been placed In the show-windows
downtown.
Telephone youi vfant ads to thi
Mlssourian. Phone 55.
TEXXIS TEAM AT ST. LOUIS
Woods and-. Loomis Win First Tno
Hounds In Yallej Doubles.
A telegram received yesterday by
ProL C. I.. Brewer from Charles
Woods, captain or the tennis team,
said that Woods and Ixomis had won
the first and second rounds in the
doubles, anil were to meet Washing
ton University that afternoon in the
Missouri Valley tennis tournament at
St. I.ouis. In the first round of the
singles both Woods and Loomis won,
but both lost in the second. Loomis
was defeated in the second round by
Teachenor of Kansas and Woods by
Hoehr or Washington.
"It looks as if Washington is in the
lead and Missouri second," said Pro
fessor Brewer yesterday morning.
"If Missouri beats Washington In the
finals today we have a chance to win
or tie in the tournament."
The seven schools entered in the
tournament are: Nebraska. Kansas.
Missouri, Kansas Agricultural Col
lege, Ames, Washington and Drake.
"WEARY WILLIES" YESTERDAY
.llude-up Hobos Parade and Hit Buck
Doors for "Eats."
The hobos rode into town yester
day on the Centralia Limited by way
or More's station. About 100 made
up "weary Willies" took part in the
parade. Tin cans, cracked derbies,
suffragets and .Missouri mules were
features.
Shot full of the wanderlust, the stu
dents roamed all day. hitting back
doors and "mooching" eats. Things
came to a climax with an entertain
ment at 2 o'clock in the auditorium,
where characteristic hobo life was
pictured and burlesqued.
Biijs Part of Barber Shop.
1 have purchased half interest in
the University Barber Shop on Ninth
street, and will be pleased to have my
old customers call at my mv shop.
(203) WILLIAM BASNETT.
BARGAIN-BUYERS
See the 98c
Window!
Campbell & Alexander
Tenth and Broadway
Where to Eat
A Suggestion!
FOR BREAKFAST
Soft Boiled Eggs
Buttered Toast
Coffee
Bacon and Kgs
Buttsred Toast
Coffee
FOR DINNER
Baked Chicken
Itoast Loin
Mashed Potatoes
Salad
Green I'eas
Dessert
Iced Tea. Coffee or Milk
FOR SUFFER
Porterhouse Steak With Mushroom
Sliced Tomatoes .
Radishes
Lettuce
Iced Tea. Coffee or .Milk
King's Cafe
(ttROADlVAV COPFliK HOUSE)
913 Broadway Phone 70S Green
Reduced Rates to
lis
On account of the Missouri Valley Track Meet, and
Pageant and Masqus, the M. K. & T. will sell round
trip tickets to St. Louis as follows:
For all trains leaving Columbia May 29th $4.50,
for all trains leaving Columbia May 30th, $3.00 for
the round trip, good returning on all regular trains up
to and including train leaving St. Louis. 11:38 p.m..
May 31st. For further particulars call on
Telephone 322 H. L. WILSON, Agent.
VIWUN
S Paeanf osMasQue
ofSainf Louis
1125,000 PrWictUi Low fare Utfcc(ty
7.000 Pcrforatn jVAik tU ucat
W f H crf uJc-r
vii Katr lirus
UUHOICSAMI
This morn
ing you can
find no better
way to start a de
lightful Sunday
than by a trip to
Peck's.
At the news
stand all the Sun
day papers arc await
ing you the maga
zine rack is full of
fine reading.
And at the foun
tain the man in
white is ready to serve
vou those inimitable
drinks we arc noted for.
The cigar you like best
is in the big case oppo
site fresh, fragrant and
ready.
First thing now you go to
PECK'S
Where to Rat
of Pork
St. Louis Via the Katy
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