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The Evening Missourian. [volume] (Columbia, Mo.) 1917-1920, December 23, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066315/1918-12-23/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE ETEXIXQ 3nSS0UItIAy, 3I0X DAT, -DECEMBER 23, 191S.
BOONE COUNTY W AR SAVINGS SALES
The following report on the sales of War sjarin r-m . . t,
SS Znty:December was made Xp?SS
Columbia
Postoffice .....,.,.
Boone County National ' -
Boone County Trust -Co " o,
Exchange rational Bank ::'",:
Columbia Savings Bank
Central Bank ..'...'.
ConleyMyers "'!!...""!!!.!..
Centralia
Bank of Centralia
-!- nci P. AforflhoTlto nniU ..
ta1'" -"-""" i ofnoooo
first . .aun.
postoffice
60,070.75
47,550.00
9,522.00
5,000.00
22.935.00
16,150.00
77,653.45
Bank of Hallsville
Hallsillle
14,875.50
Ashland
Bank of Ashland 22100.00
Rochenort
Bank of Rocheport ; 19,025.00 .
icul,. -"M" 21,100.00
Sturgeon
Bank of Sturgeon jg 800.00
Citizens Bank of Sturgeon !!!!"."" 19 600 00
Bank of Hartsburg
Farmers Bank of Hartsburg
Hartsburg
6,400.00
3,685.00
Jlarrtaburg
Bank of Harrisburg 6,337.00
$758,771.95
Boone County's Quota
638,000.00
$120,771.95
Gain during month of November $23,102.95
ASK FOR
"COLUMBIA MAID"
BREAD
Sold By All Grocers
THE NEW BREAD MADE IN COLUMBIA
Place your order for
CHRISTMAS DINNER DESSERT
Now
Christmas Special
Ice Cream
In Bricks
Orders will be taken up to noon Tuesday for the
Christmas Special.
White Eagle Dairy Co.
PHONE 360
EVERY GOOD THING
TO EAT
CHRISTIV1AS CANDIES, NUTS, DATES, FIGS,
in fact, everything to eat for the children and the older
folks, too. Let us sell you these little things that
really make Christmas.
Dressed Poultry
Everyone knows that Christmas Dinner isn't complete
without a Turkey, Chicken, Goose or Duck.
We sell them dresied and ready for the baking pan.
Send your order here and it will be filled promptly.
VAN HORN'S GROCERY
Where AH Good Things Are Sold
PHONE 204 700 BROADWAY
MASK AND AVOID
ALL CROWDS
T
Y
Some Views of the Influenza
Epidemic Collected Here
and There.
CLOTH STOPS 'EM
Scientist Says Microbes Do
Not Get Through Mesh
of Threads.
In view of the recent controversy
over the wearing of masks and the
elimination of crowds in fighting the
spread of influenza, the -Mlssourian
presents here some views on the mat
ter from other points. This opinion
on the danger of crowding voiced by
a Boston physician is from the Wash
ington Post:
"If the threatened recurrence of inj
fluenza is to be checked, there should
be a whole-hearted submission to th4
advice of the health authorities, and
cranks should not be permitted to
hamper the precautionary measures
of the public officials," said Dr. Oliver
P. Cranston, of Boston, at the Willard.
"I notice that with the outbreak of a
mild epidemic here, as elsewhere, that
there is considerable rebellion on th :
part of certain persons against th :
suggestion that churches, schools an !
other public meeting places be closed
again. In Boston, where the first epi
demic wrought havoc, there was some
opposition at first, but the theatrical
interests, which had thousands of dol
lars at stake, submitted to the orders
of the'health officials with much more
grace than did some other interests
that did not have great financial con
siderations threatened.
Crowds Must Ito Avoided.
"I do not think there is cause for
alarm, but after the splendid manner
in which Dr. W. C Fowler, co-operaf-Ing
with the national authorities in the
recent epidemic, crushed out the dis
ease, I cannot help but be impatient
or Intolerant at some of the views ex
pressed. Medical men differ some
what regarding the efficacy of maski
to prevent the spread of influenza
but there is hardly the slightest di
vergence of opinion regarding the ne
cessity of preventing public gather
incs. That is settled for all time, anil
the public should take it for granted
without any fuss." '
In the Literary Digest one finds this:1
"A large-meshed fish-net bears;
about the same sizal relation to a
swarm of flies as the common gauze;
mask bears to the Influenza germs it
is supposed to stop; and for this rca
rm flnMnro nni! nthpr nprannq whft
know something about germs, have!
been moved to comment either pitp
ingly or sarcastically on the common
public assumption that such masks af
ford protection. The openings in an
influenza mask, as seen under a mic
roscope, are enormous, while the in
fluenza germ, even under high magni
fying power, remains almost invisible.
Nevertheless, public opinion is right,
and a part, at least, of scientific opin
ion is wrong for the influenza mask
really does protect, and certain es
nerts offer explanations as to how it
does it. A writer in Engineering and
Contracting (Chicago) deals enter
tainingly with the beginning, prog
ress, and present state of the con
troversy. The commonest argument
against the "flu" masks, the writer
notes, is that the openings in the
mask bear the same relation in size
to a microbe as a barn door to a
mouse. For example, a doctor recent
ly wrote to a daily paper protesting
against the use of these masks, say
ing:
An Old Argument.
" 'If the gauze worn over the face
is expected to prevent the entrance of
microorganisms to the respiratory
tract it seems that the absurdity would
be apparent to those who know that
Pfeiffer's bacillus, pneuraococcl, or
steptococci, must be magnified many
hundreds of times to be-visible at all,
and that if the ordinary gauze mask
be magnified to the same extent it
woudl show the meshes to be so large
as to apparently offer no obstruction
to the house-fly. Such an attempt to
mechanically prevent germ invasion
might be compared to fencing against
fleas in Florida with barbed wire."
"This, comments the writer of the
article, sounds very plausible, but is
fallacious reasoning. The very same'
sort of argument was used nearly half
a century ago against uttering water
to remove typhoid germs:
"'The argument then took this
form: 'The interstices between the
grains of sand in a filter are as large
compared with the typhoid bacillus as
a door is to a mouse. If all the doors
of a house were open, a mouse could
pass from garret to cellar without be
ing stopped. How absurd, then. Is
the belief that a typhoid germ can
be caught while wandering through a
layer of sand a foot or two thick.'
"'It seem very 'absurd,' doesn't It?
Yet when an actual count of the germs
in a drop of raw water was made, and
a similar count was made of the germs
In the same water after filtration
through a thin bed of sand, it was
found that only one germ In a hun
dred had passed through! 'Incredi
ble,' but true. Of one hundred 'mice'
that started In at the garret to go
downstairs, only one reached the cel
lar, although every door was open.
Now this was no speculation or guess.
The microscope, after Dr. Robert
Koch's discoveries forty years ago.
could be used to count the microbes
In a measured volume of water even
as one might count mice in a trap.
Page Five
And the mlcroscrope made it certain
that, somehow or other, porous filter
sand does stop most of the microbes
in water.
"'It is eighty years ago this very
year since a British civil engineer,
James Simpson, finished at Chelsea,
London, the first sand-filter plant for
a city. It was Intended primarily to
remove the visible impurities of the
Thames water. Little did he or any
one else dream that the real danger
in using the water was the invisible
living things that inhabited it; for
Pasteur had not yet shown that many
diseases are caused by microbes, and
Koth had not perfected the micro
scope detection of germs. Yet it be
gan at once to be noticed that typhoid
fever was less prevalent than it had
ever been.
The Flea and the Microbe.
" 'Not until about forty years ago
was it fully demonstrated that filtra
tion can be so scientifically conducted,
by the aid of microscopic counts of
bacteria, as to remove almost all dan
gsr of contracting typhoid from drink
ing water.
"'Then came another great discov
ery, namely, that a minute quantity of
chlorln is deadly to typhoid germs.
One drop of liquid chlorin in two bar
rels of water is the average dose, but
it usually suffices to kill nearly every
typhoid germ. When the discovery of
chlorinatlon of water was announced,
it also was 'argued off the floor.'
. . 'Consider,' they say, 'the absurdity
of trying to kill the millions of mi
crobes in a barrel of water by mere
ly adding half a drop of liquid chlorin.'
Yes, it was perfectly absurd, but the
microbes all died; perhaps by laugh
ing themselves to death over the ab
surdity of it.
" 'In drawing an analogy between a
flea and a microbe, several elements
of difference are usually overlooked.
A flea not only is capable of locomo
tion, but can direct his motions by
the sense or smell. A microbe, on
the other ha i-l, is helplessly and aim
lessly carried along by currents of air
or water. In the case of microbes
that are inhaled, U seems likely that
most of them :re either attached to
particles of dust or to small globules
of moisture. In cither case, if the
mask stops the grain of dust or g!o-
bule of water the germ itseslf is
caught also.'"
As to the Churches.
Concerning the duties of the church
es the Christian Century says this:
"Some of -the churches that were
closed by the inflpenza in the autumn
are now coming in for a second per
iod of closing. It will be a mistake
to accept this as a vacation time for
religion. One of our churches which
is now facing this second closing or
nti, vi' distribute all of Its Sunday
school papers to the pupils en Sunday
moriings by front door calls. The
church members will all receive a
copy of the missionary booklet, 'An
swering the Call,' prepared by our
missionary societies, together with a
pastoral letter and directions for home
worship. .Machinery has been set in
motion for the use of the telephone
to carry church news concerning the
sick and the needy. Instead of go
ing to sleep in the face of an emer
gency, this church will simply adapt
its program to the new circumstances.
Perhaps before it finishes the employ
ment of its new devices, it will be
ready to subscribe to the optimist
creed that it is an ill wind that blows
nobody any good."
spending a cent, and I've more money
tied up in Liberty Bonds and in the
bank than I ever saved before, on an
officer's pay about halt my civilian
salary.
"That economy worked in raany
ways. For one thing, I didn't spend a
cent on theaters. Money for clothes
was only a small item after you had
your outfit, and we all tried to keep our
kit in shape so that we would not
have to be buying new things all the
time.
"We learned to organize our day so
mat we might economize in minutes,
and the time we allowed to ourselves
we spent with greatest efficiency. At
least, our company officers did. We
had profitable discussions, read a lot
and kept our mind on our work back
home that we would not get too rusty.
"A good example of this general
economy is the many uses to which
we put one pail of water. In some
camps (we could only be spared one
small pall of water each morning. I
used this for brushing my teeth, shav
ing, washing, sometimes sponge-bathingand
always had enough!"
SPEAKING OF ICE CREAM
you won't know how really fine a
refreshment or dessert it makes un
til you taste Frozen Gold. Once you
do that your appreciation of ice cream
will be doubled. Sounds like a bfg
claim possibly. Put it to the test of
actual trial and you'll think we have
been very modest about it.
WHITE EAGLE DAIRY
Phone SCO
rillHIIIIIIillllJiMllljaffl -liti
III
Hi
AVEYOU
ORDERED
HMHHE,
m
TO
OFFICER LEARNS TO SAVE
Finds "ot Only Money But Time Goes
Farther After War.
AMERICAN PRESS HEADQUAR
TERS, BRITISH FRONT, Dec. 23.
"What have I got out or the war?
Well, let's see. . . I believe the
principle lesson I'll take back to
America with me will be that of econ
omy. "For weeks I could go without
WW EDISON
wThe Phonograph With a Soul"
FOR DELIVERY
CHRISTMAS
EVE?
Parker Furniture Co,
if k.7ig
f 'flf "
7
'J
SA
vermre
w-x
Distinctive Sterling Flatware
MARYLAND
COLONIAL designs in silver have the charm
of simplicity that does notwearoff with long
familiarity. This is particularly true of the
Maryland, which has won great popularity in the
short time it has been on the market.
For the bride, nothing more appropriate could
be chosen than a chest of this beautiful pattern.
Single pieces or sets of which there is a large va
riety make charming gifts for any occasion where
sterling silver is appropriate.
JEWELER.
S
as

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