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The Butler weekly times. (Butler, Mo.) 1881-1918, April 18, 1912, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066489/1912-04-18/ed-1/seq-4/

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TwD inrap i?ta untf
BEGINNING
Saturday, April 20th
At 10 O'clock a. m.
si r
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WE WILL GIVE AWAY
Absolutely Free!
FREE SOUVENIRS
(Only one to each family)
A BEAUTIFUL SOUVENIR TUMBLER
Full table size, etched with your own
initial and wreath, like illustratration,
without any advertising whatever on
them.
DON'T FAIL TO COME
Tell Your Friends
We Offer Great Bargains in
DRESS GOODS
Choice lot of Wool Dress Goods in black and colors, fine materials for
dresses, skirts and children's wear, regular qa j
prices up to $1.00 a yard, for OtC yCl
7lAc Percales for. ...5c yd. Extra wide Sherette for ...19c yd.
$1.25 fine Embroidery Flouncings for 85c yd.
50c fast color Table Linens for.. . 39c yd.
Lots of New Rugs, Mattings, Carpets at Lowest Prices.
WaflteroMcIIOfolbeinis9
THE QUALITY STORE
April, 22d, 23d, 24th
We will have with us Mrs. L. A. Perrigo, expert corset litter who
who will be ready to advise you on corset fashion
and give free fittings of the
Celebrated Redfern Corsets
The new Redfern models are carefully designed toaccoid with the season's
style in dress. Although very durable and firm, these corsets are so light, flexi
ble and soft that they will fit you as part of the body itself, delineating the beauti
ful natural lines of the figure, and affording that suppleness and poise which
modern styles and comfort demand. -
WaBteirIviIcKnD3)Ibeinis9
THE QULITY STORE
The Butler Weekly Times
Tinted on Thursday of each week
J. D. ALLEN, Proprietor
ROBT. D. ALLEN, Editor and .Manager
Entered at the Post OrHce or Butler, Mo., as
Mcond-class mail matter.
PRICE, $1.00 fER YEAR
ANNOUNCEMENTS
We are authorized to make the following an-
nooncemenl. snbjt-ct 10 the Democratic primary i
of Batei County, August. I9i: I
REPRESENTATIVE
L. B BASKKRVILLE
Of Oeepwater Township
; torn which limits the President to two
terms regards the substance and not
the form, and under NO CIRCUM
STANCES WILL I BE AOAIN A CAN
DIDATE FOR OR ACCEPT ANOTHER
NOMINATION FOR PRESIDENT.
Theodore Roosevelt, Nov. 8, 1904.
I have not changed and 'shall not
change that decision thus announced.
Theodore Roosevelt, Dec. 11. 1907.
I WILL ACCEPT THE NOMINATION
FOR PRESIDENT IF ITIS TENDERED
TO ME. -Theodore Roosevelt, Feb.
a6, 1912.
J. WALLI9 LKW1S
Of West Point Township.
JUDGE SOUTHERN DISTRICT.
J. W. DABBY
Of Walnut Township
FBANK FIX
Rockvllle Township
JUDGE NORTHERN DISTRICT.
Wn. F. WOLFE
Deer Creek Township.
T. L. HARPER
lit. Pleasant Township
SHERIFF
J. W. BAKES
Of Osage Township.
A. M. WALLACE
Howard Township
W. N. ALLltAN
Homer Township
HABVK JOHK80N
ktt. Pleasant Township
TREASURER.
C. F. PXRBT
Of Osage Township.
ROBERT L. BRAOKN
CHARLES M. BABKLEY
ML Pleasant Township
W. B. WELCH
Summit Township
JOHN H. 8TONI
Deer Creek Township.
CORONER
DR. R.X.CRABTBXE
Mt. Pleasant Ivwaahlp.
NO PRIVATE WARS.
I
! When Attorney General Major said
i in his speech here Saturday "I have
j nothing to say derogatory to the
gentlemen who are running against
1 me. I have always been too busy
j fighting the enemy to abuse the mem
jbers of my own party," he struck a
chord which rings responsive in the
breast of every old time Democrat in
Missouri.
- Democrats should have no private
wars.
To lose the State this fall would
mean years of Republican rule in Mis
souri before the machine of which
Governor Hadley has so ably started
the construction could be overthrown
by the people. We have had a full
and fair sample of the rule of the
"mysterious stranger" whose repre
sentative occupies the governor's
chair when he is not "discovering"
White River or managing his 10 . acre
ranch and it is distasteful in the ex
treme. Only by a united effort may we rid
ourselves of this incubus, and a united
effort means the putting aside of per
sonal feelings, sentiment and petty
grievances and placing our strongest
men at the head of the party and
working for the common cause
Democracy.
We must nominate our strongest
and best men from the highest office
to the least and give them our loyal,
unswerving support, for this is a criti
cal time and Democrats cannot afford
to indulge in private wars. , .
WASHINGTON LETTER.
Special Washington Correspond
ent of The Times.
By Clyde H. Tavenncr.
Washington, D. C. The impres
sion is steadily gaining ground that
the Democratic excise-income tax,
which proposes to place upon wealth
a part of the burden of sustaining the
government, will pass the Senate and
the White House. Senator Penrose,
who pretends to be the leader of the
Standpatters in the Senate, has made
the statement that none of the Demo
cratic bills would be allowed to pass
the Senate, but it is becoming more
and more apparent Senator Penrose
and those who believe as hedoes no
longer have the power to "allow"
certain measures to pass, or prevent
THAT BROKEN PLEDGE.
Oa tft 4tk March swart I steal
i my first
The WBM 1
others from passing.
The truth is, a great many of the
Senators, on both sides of the cham
ber, either because they are at last
frightened by the wave of protest
against the high tariff injustices, or
because the believe in the inherent
justice of the income tax measure,
have come to look favorably on the
In the past, the tariff barons have
urged a tariff for two principle rea
sons, rirst, they pretended that they
wanted to protect American working
men. That this argument, which the
Republican protectionists listened to
with a willing ear for the past sixteen
years, is a farce, pure and simple,
has been proven by the Democrats at
this session of Congress, chiefly
through the various investigations
into trust methods. Secondly, the
trusts urged that in no other way
could revenue to support the govern
ment be collected.
Having disposed of the first argu
ment, the Democrats, through the
excise-income tax bill, have offered a
solution of the other alleged difficulty.
The Democratic party believes there
is another way to meet the expenses
of government, gnH thnt thnt wny lifi
erican standard" is a reality except in
j these classes controled by the tariff
1 trusts. The trusts make all the noise
j about "protecting" American labor,
jand yet it is only the unprotected
1 labor of this country which really en
joys an advantage over the labor of
Europe in the matter of wages.
The Democrats have proven at this
session of Congress that the tariff
trusts share none of their loot with
their own laborers, and the watch
trust "slipped a cog" when it cited
the high wages of unprotected Ameri
can workers as a reason for maintain
ing the present high tariff on watches.
through an income tax. And on the
merits of that belief the party is going
to ask for national support next No
vember.
"Protection" and Wages.
The American Jewelers Association
which is the other name for the watch
trust, recently sent to each member
! Piano for Sale.
1
I Smith & Barnes upright parlor
grand, mahogany case, one year's
j lisft, at half price, part on time.
26-lt -:- A. S. Milhorn.
On the Wing.
The egg roast at Ed Bailey's grove
was immense. A big crowd, both
old and young, was there. A large
crowd from Virginia was also pres
ent and all had a good time.
Ike Dawson doesn't know whether
he is building a house for a son-in-law
or a daughter-in-law.
Miss Sallie, daughter of Z. W. Cha
ney, has returned from her Kansas
visit. She brought back some photos,
so it looks as though she might go to
Kansas to stay.
Fred Wright has built a nice little
cottage on the north 40 of the Dan
McConnel farm. His son-in-law, Mr.
Fox, who bought a part of the Mc
Connel Illace. has hepn mnvinrr rh
I balance of his goods since the roads
have dried up.
Mrs. McConnel and her son, Ralph,
have gone to their new home in California.
measure. At least there has been a of Congress an elaborately prepared
The President has signed the bill
to tax white prosphorus matches. . It
is claimed the taW will, in effect, pro
hibit their manufactured. The match
es hare, .been . denounced in congres
sional hearing as- harmful to laborers
engaged in their manufacture.
cesation of the talk about the "un
constitutionality" of the bill, and
since this always has been the stand
pat way of opposing all logical meas
ures, the sign is considered a good
one. Nobody pretends to know, of
course, what President Taft will do
in the event the bill passes the Senate
and reaches him, but from the
amount of popular approval that has
been accorded the measure, it is ad
mitted by even the friends of the
President that a veto for this measure
will mean political suicide for him.
The present tariff law raises about
1330,000,000 a year in government
revenue. And for every dollar of
revenue turned into the United States
treasury, it is estimated by Demo
cratic leaders in Congress who have
studied the question from every pos
sible angle, that the tariff barons put
five into their own pockets in the
form of loot In other words, the
tariff gives these beneficaries the
right to collect five dollars in tribute
for every dollar the government col
lects in revenue.
- This condition is alone responsible
forme horde of mushroom million
aires in this country. On every hand
the people pay tribute. .
oooKiet, aescriDea as A Keport on
the Relative Cost of Producing Watch
Movements in America and European
Countries. " The whole argument of
the booklet centers around an attempt
to-prove that it costs more in this
country to produce a "watch than it
does abroad, because of the "higher
labor cost."
While dedicated to watches, the
report devotes two pages to showing
the difference in wages in other lines,
the general purpose being to demon
strate that wages, in all lines of in
dustry, are higher in America than
they are in Europe. Following is
one of the tables of figures:
- - England America
Per Week
Book-keepers. . .
Clerks
Bricklayers.
Teamsters
Watchmen
Carpenters.....
Painters........
...17.75
... 470
...9.10
... 6.00
,.. 6.48
.. 8.85
.. a 16
$20.79
13.75
31.20
12.00
15.00
27.25
21.80
raw
13!
- -lA4J--'"y-5 A
A study of the above column be
comes doublyfateresting. when it is
seen that every one of the occupa
tions given is unprotected by a tariff.
In all clases of labor in this country,
the "American wage" and the "Am-j
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I Oil III IIIIM :
Several have been trying to sow
oats but have had to give it up on ac
count of the ground being too wet.
The Miller school will be out next
Friday. They are going to have a
small oropram in the aftornnnn Mies
Clellah Grant is teacher.
G. W. Chaney sets the date of his
paper ahead one year.
Frank Smith, the'dog man on the
Duvall ranch, took a sack of pups to '
Butler for sale. He had the best of
luck, as he got his price before he
got on the square. John F. Ludwick
got the whole push. John says they
are fine and smart and are not for
sale, as he turned them over to the
marshall.
Grover Moore of Amoret visited
his sister, Mrs. Chester Smith of
near Cornland, Saturday and Sunday.
Geo. McGuire and wife and Ben
Craft and familv visiter! Snonvr
Adams Sunday. .
Uncle Jim RraHW fin I T jn Gnu'lti
and family visited at Fred Medley's
ounaay.
Jno. Howard, errand hosa in mak
ing some good improvements on the
Duvall ranch. They have built anew
boardincr house nnrl hfiVstt flimavl 4 Via
old boarding bouse into 3 dwellings.
Rev. Keele filled his regular ap
pointment at Salem Saturday and
Sunday.
Chas. Burk wants a man fr nmrlr
for him by the month on the farm. '
Seveno'phones were put in by L.
S. Paddock Monday, 3 miles east of
Virginia running norm. :
'Mrs. Robert F. PriHor mJ oa
years, died at the home of her moth
er, Mrs. NeEie Hnlen, in this dry
early Wednesday rnorning of tuber-:
viuuBta. nor aiisoajxi, a son. ner
mother; and three sisters survive to
mourn their losjai'T"-'"'''5'.' ?-yirs.-vc!
A -'

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