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The Butler weekly times. (Butler, Mo.) 1881-1918, August 13, 1914, Image 8

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066489/1914-08-13/ed-1/seq-8/

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Official Vote of Bates County Primary Election,
Aug. 4, 1914
Missouri News in Brief
,,. -. i . ; ! , i
- 1
- i
The Blackwater Drainage Ditch
Company has filed suit against John-
son county for $12,000 damages.
Four years ago the company began
digging the ditch and the county
stnnned nassae over public roads
by injunction.
Tuesday State Treasurer Edwin P
DeajjrecejyednjJurned. Into the
treasury checks from the various
State depositories tor the July inter
est on the State's daily balances. The
total of the interest for the month is
S22.632.4r. of which $14,548.34 is on
the current funds in the Treasury and
$8,084.41 is on the Capitol building
fund. -
As an'advocate of peace, Dr
Bar
tholdt frankly admits he has no place
in EuroDe at this particular time. He
said this was intimated to him in
cablegram from a fellow peace-work
er. "The war will be short and de
cisive," said the Congressman.
"Maybe its effect will be so disastrous
that disarmament will follow. Then
the peace movement will gain
strength." " -
The department of development of
the Frisco Railroad system has just
completed a "man on the ground"
estimate of the apple crop in South
Missouri and Northwestern Arkansas
the home of the "big red apple
The estimate places the probable
shipments at 2,277 cars from South
ern Missouri and 1,056 cars from
Northwestern Arkansas,, or a total of
3,333 carloads. The actual shipments
last year were 1,232 cars and the es
timate of this year indicates .almost a
threefold increase.
The record price for cattle for three
or four years was reached yesterday
in East St. Louis, when cattle brought
$10 Der 100 nounds. a jump of 10
cents on the hundred in two days.
Yesterday morning.about 9:30 o'clock,
the National Live Stock Commission
Company sold three carloads of cat
tle to Armour & Co. The cattle
averaged 1,383 pounds, and the price
averaged $138.30, or 10 cents a pound
on the hoof. The rise, it is believed,
is due to war conditions in Europe. -
Domestics at the Executive Mansion
in Jefferson City were alarmed about
11 o'clock Tuesday night by the pe
culiar actions of John P. Ruby, a
bricklayer. Ruby first tried to enter
the mansion through one of the base
ment windows, then went to the rear
and demanded admittance. The
housekeeper and a maid ordered Ruby
to leave. "I must see the Governor
at once," he said, "for I have im
portant financial business to talk over
with him." The police arrested Ruby,
but later released him..
Thirtv-eieht persons were killed
and twenty-five injured, six fatally.
-when a northbound passenger tram
on the Kansas City Southern Railway
crashed head-on into motijr car No
103, on the Missouri & North Arkan
sas Railway, near Tipton Ford, twelve
mile? south of Joplin at 5:30 o'clock
Wednesday evening. The Missouri
& North Arkansas Railway . uses the
Kansas City Southern tracks from
Joplin to Neosho.' The cars met on a
curve. The motor car, which was
going about thirty-five miles an hour,
was telescoped and took fire. Thirty
eight charred bodies were brought to
Joplin on a relief train Wednesday
night The injured have been placed
in Joplin hospitals. " The motor car is
said to have overrun her orders to
meet passenger train No. 4 at Tipton
Ford. All of the injured except the
conductor and engineer of the pas
sender train were passengers on the
motorcar.
A "flying squadron" of motor cars
bearing suffragist orators will leave
Columbia next week to tour Missouri
in the interest of the amendment to
the state constitution, to be voted on
this fall, which, will grant the ballot
to women. Among the speakers who
' will take part in the Missouri cam
paign are: Miss Jane Addams, Hull
House, Chicago; Mrs. Beatrice Forbes
Robinson Hale, New York; Dr. Anna
Howard Shaw, New York, president
of the National Woman Suffrage As
sociations. Miss Lavina Engle, Wash
ington, D. C, secretary of the Na
tional American Woman Suffrage As
sociation, has arrived to take part in
the Missouri campaign with Mrs.
Walter McNab Miller, president of
the. Missouri association, who has
headquarters in Colombia. Miss En
gie organized the state suffrage as
sociations in North Carolina, South
Carolina and Florida, and recently
came from Chicago where she had
aaatatnif in the ISinois campaign that
rare women the ballot Mies Engte
amiHflnse will win in an
where It Is to be voted on this. fan,
except possibly bhio. Mrs Miller
will leave here Friday night fo cam
paign in Kansas City and St. Joseph.
She announced that Harold McCor
mjck, Chicago, had sent $17000 to aid
in the campaign. Many pieces of
jewelry are coming to headquarters
for the campaign melting pot.
JgeErlfrortdirDead!
Jefferson City, Mo., Aug. 6.
Judge Elijah H. Norton, whose death
at Platte City is reported today, ranked
as one of the foremost lawyers who
ever sat on the bench of the Supreme
Court of Missouri and his decisions
are todav referred to as models of
legal literature and learning.
He was born in Logan county,.Kyv
Novembe'r 21, 1821, and was educat
ed at Cantrall College and Transyl
vania University. He came to Mis
souri in 1842. He 'as elected Cir
puit .Judtre before thi Civil War and
was a member of Congress in 1861
and 1862. - In 1868 he was the Dem
ocratic nominee for Judge of the Su
preme.Court and was defeated.
He was a member of the constitu
tional convention of 1875 and was ap
pointed Judge of. the Supreme Court
in 1876. In 1878 he was elected
Judge of tlie Supreme Court for a
term of ten years. 1. '
He left the bench in' January, 1889,
and had since lived in . retirement.
His portrait has a placd of honor on
the- walls of the Supreme Court room."
Mrs. Dan Orear
Mrs. Dan Orear, aged 25 years,
died at her . home north of Virginia
Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock
after a short illness. i
Bessie Kinion was born in Cass
county, Iowa, January J, 1889 ana
was united in marriage to Dan O.
Orear on February 6, 1907. Her
husband and two sons survive her.
- Mrs. Orear had been a member of
the . Methodist church for over 11
years and had lived a consecrated
christian life throughout her entire
life. She was of a.family of sfx chil
dren and is survived by three sisters:
Mrs. Robt. Orear of near Foster,
Miss Oval and Vera Kinion of Vir
ginia, and a orotner, uiauae iunion,
of-Amoret.
Funeral services conducted by Rev.
Snow were held, at the home Thurs
day morning at 10 o'clock and inter
ment in Oak Hill cemetery at Butler.
Called Election Contested '
Sedalia, Mo., Aug. 6. Whether , a
primary election is a general election
will be determined at a vote on local
option in Pettis County, outside of Se
dalia, September 4. If a primary is
held not to be a general election, the
order for a special local option elec
tion, issued by the Pettis County
Court, will stand, and the wets and
drys will begin a whirlwind Campaign.
The wets petitioned for the election
outside of Sedalia. The drys are now
endeavoring to forestall them with the
contention that the recent primary
election was a general election and
that no special election can be held
within sixty days preceding or follow
ing it. The National Antisaloon
League. Chicago, has been asked for
a leader to carry on the dry campaign
M. E. Church, South
Sabbath School at 9:30.
Preaching at 11:00 a. m.i by the
pastor. i
Epworth League at 7:00 p. m.
Midweek service Wednesday even
ing at 8:00 o. m. followed by choir
practice. In order to meet the wish
of those in the community who can
not or who do not desire .to attend
the Chautauqua on Sunday evening,
the Ministers Alliance, has arranged
to hold one preaching service.
This service will be held in the M.
E. Church, South and Brother Hanby
will preach the sermon
You are cordially invited to attend
these services.
W. J. Snow, Pastor.
List of Letters
remaining uncalled for in the post
office at Butler. JHo., for thePweek
ending August 11, 1914: I
-L N. Appleby, C. E. Broyn,
Dailey, Frank Davis,' R. H. Moore,
A. H. Warner, Mrs. J. D. Baugh,
Miss Edith Brown, Emma Carlton,
Mrs. Alice HilL Carrie Ransy.
These letters will be sent
it to
:o the
dead letter office August 25th,
1914,
call-
if not delivered before. ' In
ing for the above, please say
Adver-
used," giving date of list
. J. E. Williams. Postmaster.
. 9 For Sale or Trade H
XWe have a good second hand 4 pas
senger automobile to trade for young
mares or nuues
McFarknd A
Democratic Candidates.
Senator in Congress:
- William J. Stone....
William H. Wallace.
John M. Dawson
State Sup't Public Schools:
Howard A. Gass
Judge Supreme Court No. 1
James T. Blair
Perry S. Rader....
Thomas J. Delaney. . . . . .
Rep. in Congress, 6th Dist:
Clement C. Dickinson...
Thomas W. Silvers
State Senator, 16th Dist:
Lucien B. Baskerville.
John Baldwin
Rep. State Legislature:
P. A. Bruce
Jas. N. Sharp
Presiding Judge Go."
R. B. Campbell...
A. B. Owen. . . . . . .
Court
Judge County Court, N.
L. S. Paddock
Estes Smith
W. F. Wolfe...'.....
Dist.
Judge County Court, S. Dist:
Frank Fix
W. H. Lowder.
Judge Probate Court:
Carl J. Henry
Miles S. Horn
Clerk Circuit Court:
H. O. Maxey
63
Clerk County Court:
W. G. Dillon
W. H. Dunn
Frank Holland. . . .
26
Recorder of Deeds:
C. C. Duke
Chas. E. Fortune
Geo. J. Moore ......
Chas. Wickliffe Ray.
Hayden E. Ray
F. M. Woods
Prosecuting Attorney:
D. C. Chastain......
Howell H. Heck
59!
The Chautauqua
The Butler Chautauqua opened
last Monday.for eight day and night
performances. The attendance the
first afternoon was good, and it has
increased at each succeeding session,
until the large tent js crowded both
afternoon and night. The weather
has been delightful and the people
are enjoying every session.
The social interim 'between per
formances of ten minutes enables the
people to visit among themselves, and
the occasion seems to be greatly en
joyed. Monday afternoon and night Sara
Ruth Bates and her- girls" met every
expectation; and the lecture by Kerr
Boyce Tupper was well received.
Tuesday afternoon and night Mme.
Morreali's quartette was a disappoint
ment to the untrained ear, whatever
it may have been to the musically ed
ucated, but the night entertainment
was richly redeemed by Arthur
Kachel in his presentation of "The
Music Master."
Wednesday afternoon the Eastern
artists made a successful appearance
and Frederick Kenyon Brown's story
of "Through the Mill" held the ear
nest attention of the crowd. At night
eye
the Eastern artists were again in evi
dence; and the lecture of John Mer-
ritte Driver on the."War in Europe"
held the closest attention of the large
a
crowd out to hear him. It was time-
ly and informing.
Today a grand musical festival by
the Imperial Ladies' Orchestra is on
the boards afternoon anil night, and
we are assured that a real treat is in
store for our music loving people.
The program will continue to get
better and public interest is increas
ing.
Next Monday afternoon Vice Presi
dent Thomas R. Marshall is billed to
talk. Sunday will be devoted to
music and picturej?and a record
laix
crowd is expected. N So far the Chau
tauqua is a success and all tne peo
ple should attend and encourage
continuance from year to year.
Edward W. Foots
Edward W. Fouts, aged 44 years,
died at his home in Passaic Friday,
August 7, after only a brief illness.
He was a native of Morgan county,
Ohio. Mr. Fouts was manager of the
W. W. Cannon elevator station at
Passaic. i-;, ji.'.-. -i
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In an Around Maysburg.
There was a large crowd attended
the ice cream supper af; Mr. Hart's
Friday night for the benefit of the
Christian.church. They cleared $45.
Mrs. Godwin and Mrs. Farmer as
sisted Mrs. Clark with her dinner for
thrashers Monday.
Mrs. Sterling Harness and children
have gone to Nevada for a visit with
relatives. '. "
Tan White and wife went to Butler
Saturday to bring the children home.
They had been visiting their, grand
parents,. Mr. and Mrs. Richards.
They also brought home a new car
riage. 1
Well, next is the Reunion at Urich
which begins Aug. 17. . Everyone
must go and see all their friends, take
their dinner, listen to the speaking
and singing and enjoy themselves in
general.
Jim Ewing took several men to
Butler Monday in his new car.
Mr. Middleton and sons have purr
chased a new Maxwell car.
Cars are getting numerous in this
neighborhood. . - ' -
Ermin Coonrod got a nettle in his
Saturday and had to go to the
doctor to have it removed. -
Mrs. Clary visited with her parents
few days last week. -
We are needing rains badly. Had
a little shower Monday morning, but
not enough to do much good.
Grandma Cumpton and Minnie
Dudney called on Mrs. White Friday
morning. , A NEIGHBOR.
One' of our business men and his
family went to Independence in his
car to visit relatives. They were
gone a week and when they returned
he found his bill for electric light cur
rent during his absence amounted to
dollars and thirty cents, about
dollar a day. He also found the cur
rent turned on the electric iron, which
was burned out, the stand charred
and the wonder was that the house
had not been set on fire. Record.
John H. Hartman, 92 years old and
a resident of Bourbon county for six
ty-five years, died at Ft Scott Thurs
day. He was mustered in the Mexi
can war and served the full four years
In the Civil War, taking his wife and
little son with himon all of the cam
paigns. Rich HID Review. !-V
z
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Is now on, and the best number or the program
will be given each day between the hours of
8 and 1 1:30 a. m. and will be designated as the
Ladies Aid, for the ladies will surely not wish
to cook a hot dinner just before attending Chau
tauqua in the afternoon. So we Jiave for them
a specially selected luncheon consisting of
Ice cold watermelon
Cantelope
Pine ripe tomatoes
Nice golden bananas
Large yellow peaches
Fine sweet split pickles
Medium small sour pickles
Nice ripe olives
Stuffed olives
Plain olives
Grape juice
Ice tea blend tea
Echo sugar waters
Vanilla wafers
' And that delicious Huyler's crystalized ginger
GOSN ELL'S GROCERY
Phone No. 77 North Side Square ! Butler, to.
F. J. ROGERS
Both Experienced and
Farm Sales and Pedigreed
Amoret,
iiii
PHONE F' J' Rosers, Poster. Mo.
MWti 1 L.W. Lent, Amsrct tfo.
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I.
Libby's potted ham
Underwoods deviled ham
Vienna Sausage
Wet shrimps ,
Dry shrimps
Tuna fish
Fancy red salmon
Imported oil sardines
Mustard sardines
Pememoes
Cheese
Cookies, Cookies, Cookies'
Crackers
Normanda wafers
L. W. LENT
School .Trained
Stock a Specialty
Mo.
vy-f

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