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The Cape weekly tribune. (Cape Girardeau, Mo.) 1914-1914, October 16, 1914, Image 2

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THE CAPE WEEKLY TRIBUNE, CAPE GIRARDEAU, MISSOURI
THE GAPE WEEKLY TRIBUNE
AND THE CAPE COUNTY HERALD.
Every Friday by "r:
THE CAPE GIRARDEAU PUBLISHING COMPANY.
APPLICATION FOIi KXTttY AS SECOND CLASS MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE
AT CAPE CilHARDEAU, MO.. PENDING.
ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR IN ADVANCE
CORNERING THE COTTON CROP.
The plans of the Kentucky men to buy up all of the cotton in this terri-
lory, as outlined in a news story appearing on another page of today's
Tribune, is evidence that these financiers do not expect the European war
'o continue jnuch longer.
It was predicted when the war began that it would end before the severe
winter weather came, and men of influence who are familiar with condi
tions in Europe, still cling to that belief. If the war should end soon cot
ion would be in great demand just as will all other products from which
clothing can be made.
The Kentucky men are undoubtedly endeavoring to effect a corner on
cotton, and if such a .scheme could ever be looked upon with favor it is
just now. Men who control the money market in this country have always
i-liown a tendency to limit the amount in circulation when a real crisis arose.
And that is one reason why a great many people have always looked upon
the plutocratic interest as being more of a menace than an asset to the
ration.
But to bring on hard times by refusing to invest in crops seems like bad
judgment as well as almost criminal. Men who refuse to circulate their
money naturally s-tore it up somewhere, and the man who visits in cotton,
wheat and corn is just as safe as hewho hoardes it.
By buying cotton now, the Kentuckians not only render great assist
ance to the grower and the small merchant who depends upon the producer
but it is like casting broad upon the water. These investors will get their
money back and they will get it back ten fold.
When the war is over cotton will be in greater demand than it has ever
been before. And prices are fixed by the demand. And although the
Kentucky tobacco men may be preparing for a golden harvest by buying up
the cotton, no one will regret to see them garner it.
When 1h; war is over there will be more business than this country,
knows what to do with, but the problem pust at present is, how can the
pillars in this ci.unuy be induced to work now and lessen the rush that will
follow the war?
The Kentucky mm are doing the right thing, and if big business a'! over
iho country would follow the example set by the blue grass state, the
factories and mills would be running as they never did before.
A TRAGEDY AND ITS LESSON.
The tragedy enacted upon the streets of Cane Girardeau Sunday shows
ii'.w easily trivial things may assume serious proportions. A piece of pie
l iaised th siM h.iiS, if not fatal injury of a man who is beloved by those who
know him. Mr. Taylor, who wounded Mr. Freeman, also is well-known and
has been pr:i ii'i ntiy connected in this city for many years.
It is needles:; to say that both men now regret that they did net make
coi.ce.ssien.-!, but h Is too late. . Yet this shooting should serve as a lesson to
"others. Shootings never occur without weapons, and those whose duties
kt p them armed, hi. u'.d make it a practice to use them only on criminals.
The participants in Sunday's tragedy had been friends. The shooting,
h refer;, was not duo to malice. It was simply a case of too much tem-
,. While the community will wait and patiently hope for Mr. Freeman's
i-i - wry, it will uU-. sympathize with Mr. Taylor.
GROWING CAPE GIRARDEAU.
Cape Girardeau h is now about one hundred and fifty buildings that
v.v-re not here this time last year. By the close of 1914 probably fifty more
will ith' r be under obstruction or finished. In proportion to its population
this civ is outgrowii.g St. Louis, andf its growth this year is no better
than it was last year or the year before that.
Cap- Girardeau is growing because it has th:: location and the kind of
people who make a city. The outlook for next y?ar is as rosy as the pros
perous year that have gone by.
Every season a new subdivision is opened and filled with houses. Next
spring building will in all probability begin in the extreme southern part
of the city. Thv tract of ground which Louis Houck will sell this month is
one of the most desirable that has been opened for residtential purposes in a
long time. It contains enough ground to make small town and the contour
of thlup.d makes it an ideal location for homes. Therefore Cape Girardeau
may prepare to watch its southern extremity grow.
A KING'S UNTARNISHED RECORD.
A politician once said: "If you can't beat the other party, jine 'em."
That teems like good advice to the Belgians just now. They started out to
erase Germany from the map, but if all reports are tme, a perfect picture
of Belgium just now would resemble a piece of Swiss cheese.
When the Germans began their assault on the city of Antwerp, accord
ing to the reports, they were firing 200 of the largest siege guns made. Each
of these threw twenty projectiles a minute, and therefore the total number
of shells hurled into Antwerp was 210,000 a minute, or 3,360,000 every twenty-four
hours.
V.'c do not criticize King Albert for hot-footing it out of town. When a
big city is reduced to a hole in the ground, it is time for its residents to
: peed up, and when it comes to running, an ordinary human being has
r.-uhhig on a king.
Albert took or. speed every mile after leaving Antwerp, according to the
off.cial time-keeper, and when he reached Ghent he was running so fast
that he couldn't .stop, so he just sprinted right through the town and on
to OsteP'l.
The Kaiser, faithful to his love of the chase, even in times of war, ordered
a few thousand of his speediest warriors to pursue the king. These soldiers
lef i Antwerp fcr Ghent on tip top speed, but when they reached that city
Albert had outdistanced Ahem and was not even visible through a powerful
field glass. It therefore became necessary for the Germans to take charge
of Ghent and give the city a thorough frisking. But Al was not there.
Then the second lap of the race began. When the soldiers reached Ostend
ti'"y found the King had been there long enough to throw up improvised
breastworks and install an army behind them. The Germans were com
pelled to pause a few minutes to batter down these home-made fortifica
tion, and this afforded Albert time to escape from the city on the other side
and generate enough speeel to safely elude his pursuers.
The Kaiser's soldiers will take Ostend today, but they'll not catch Albert.
Wrc are not familiar enough with a Jung's movements to even speculate on
his whereabouts, but we know that w herevr he is, he is still running.
The Germans may outwind AI or run him down by sheer speed, but when
h-' becomes a German possession, the Kaiser will have to admit that king
or no king, that boy can go some.
- - r
HONOR VIRTUE AND TRUTH.
By Eugene C. Dolson.
How well to impress their meaning
In the pliant mind of youth
These words of beautiful import:
Honor, virtue and truth.
And best, I think, is the mother
Who would fain this wealth impart,
Truth and virtue and honor,
For guidance of each child-heart.
Truth and virtue and honor
These are the gems of earth;
Promise of future manhood,
Warrant of manly worth.
Hyman Caldwell of Caruthersville,
is in the city on business stopping
with his brother, Ike Ca'dwell and
family.
Miss Mary and Otto Kochtitky left
Monday for Maiden, were they will at
tend the marriage of tho;r brother,
Wade Kochtitzky, and Miss Ruth
Stokes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
John Stokes, which will tuke place
Wednesday evening, October 11 i he
home of tho bride's parents. Tne wed
ding will be a quiet affair, only the
immediate family of the briday party
being present, but there will be a re
ception afterwarels, for which about
one hundred invitations have been
issued. Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Byrd of
St. Louis, and Mr. and Mrs. Otto
Kochtitzky of this city, parents of the
groom, will leave Tuesday for Malelen.
Mrs. Max Kocck had r. few friends
in for careb Monday evening in honor
of her Mother, Mrs. O. E. Forster. The
guests of the evening were Mesdames
P. O. Hoch, H. C. Wasem, Wm. II.
Harrison. Quite a delightful evening
was passed in enjoying a great game
of Bridge.
Mrs. William A. O'Brien will enter
tain the Bridge club Tuesday after
noon at her apartment on Frederick
street.
Mrs. Kelward Rozier of Farmington,
is visiting her daughter, Mrs. P. B.
Leming.
Mrs. Thomas Fitzpatrick left Mon
day morning for St. Louis and from
there will iournev to her home at
Shrevcport, La. Mrs. Fitzpatrick has
been visiting her mother, Mrs. W. T
Wilson for the past three weeks and
was the guest of honor at many social
affairs during her stay.
Miss Marjorie Post is expected
home today from the east, where she
has been enjoying the summer months
The Christ Church Guild will meet
today with Mrs. N. C. Weiler at her
home on South Spanish street.
Arthur Koerner arrived from St.
Louis Monday, coming down for a visit
with his wife and baby, who have been
spending several weeks with Mrs.
Koerner's mother, Mrs. Louis Bert
ling. They will return to their home
Wednesday.
E. M. Strong and family were in the
city Monday ,the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Dan Heard of South Sprigg
street.
The U. D. C. had a well attended
meeting Monelay afternoon at the resi
dence of Mrs. William Medley, the
hostess of the day bcinc Mrs. W. T
Wilson. N. S. Weiler and Mis. .Med
ley. The local chapter sent a nice sum
to the Kentucky State Chapter, as
their part in the Jefferson Davis
Memorial Fund, and also voted to
purchase a ba'e jf cotton, giving their
small assistance in the. present serious
conditions in the so ith among the cot
ton growers. An interesting feature
of the meeting was the a .dress by
Rev. J. J. Clopton, on Southern lead
ership. Rev. Clopton has written sev
eral well known art". -es ewi the s jj'h
and its generals, which arc most in
teresting, as he, b?ing a Virginian, ard
residing in Richmond for many. .oprs,
is thoroughly vamiliar wiih the
scenes and the'- horoej, an 1 ean lalk
with truth and filing on tr.is splendid
subject.
The local chapter .f tlw V. L C.
has decided on u '.iou'1 plan .i wh'ch
to help the cotton growers of H e
south, and on Hidlov Veil they v:;l
give a Cotton Ball. At thi., ball the
ladies attending will wear t often
gowns, no one bemg allowed to enter
in any other costunv. Ite gcr.tiei .'.en's
part in the dress of the evening v. ill
be the cotton tic wuich they will le
required to wear. Further plans for
the ball have not boon ma'le, but the
U. D. C. will hold a special meeting
Wednesday afternoon at which time
they will complete thi arrangements
for the affair, ar.d a f armal announce
ment will b'1 maele after that. Know
ing the s.'.rious conditions which pre
vail at the. preccnt in the Southern
States, the women th.v country over
are prcvirg thir interest and patriot
ism by jo:r.:i.g hands with the suffer
ers, ard using vh'lr influence and
ability in finding a market for this
stupendous southern product and a re
lief from the awful wrr.t which is
predominating at tht; present time.
So the U. D. C. have chesen this at
tractive manner in adding their r.ame
to the list of thousands of ther women,
who are working for this worthy cause
and undoubtedly they will have the
support of the club women and their
families throughout the city.
No woman need despair this season
because her favorite silks and velvets
are unobtainable on account of the
European war. American manufac
turers have come valiantly to the
rescue, and so beautiful and distin
guished ara the materials now pre
sented for selection fabrics woven
and dyed right here in America that
after the war is over it is quite safe
to predict that these American ma
trials will hold equal rank with im
ported stuffs.
Almost the moment war was de
clared, chiffons, housselines and nets
of foreign manufacture jumped in
price, and women who had set their
hearts on winter evening gowns made
of these fabrics had a sinking of the
heart, but it was speedily discovered
that just as airy, just as beautiful ma
terials, in colors as soft and exclusive
could be obtained in the shops, and the
march of winter fashions has not been
one whit delayed as far as America is
concerned.
The friends of Mrs. Harry Rogers
will be glad to learn that she has been
removed from St. Francis hospital to
the home of her mother, Mrs. Chris
Schraeder, on Middle street very much
improved, and a speedy recovery is
hoped for by her physician.
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Sullivan return
ed Tuejday morning from their wed
ding trip which they spent on the
ranch at Brownwood, of Tom Baldwin,
son of the well known aviator. They
are comfortably settled at 14.. South.
Spanish street, and will be glad to
welcome their friends there.
The St. Agues' Guild of the Epis
copal church will meet this afternoon
with the Misses Clopton at the par
sonage.
Chcrchez La Fcmme.
A western iletective said in the
smoking room at a San Francisco ho
tel:
"T locate the dishonest clerk,
isolated the one who was chasing
round in iaxicabs to roog gardens
with young ladies."
He shook his head and added:
"A slip of a girl can make the stead
iest man fall."
The benefit performance given by
the ladies of the Civic Improvement
association Monday night at the
Broadway thontcr attracted ejuite
good crowd. The pictures at this pop
ular show house always please their
audiences, and the people are so ac
customed to the management giving
them the be; t there is in the moving
picture line, a benefit performance is
generally an assured success.
Miss Nell Saupe of South Sprigg
street, had a few friends in Monday
evening in honor of her birthday an
niversary. The time was passed in en
joying cards and music, and later a
tempting luncheon. Among the guests
were Misses Meta, Tekla Schack,
Messrs. Elmer and Oscar Schack and
Irvin Saupe.
Miss Marguerite Oliver is at pres
ent enjoying a visit with friends at
Richmond Virginia, and her Cap?
friends will be glad to learn that she
will be home the latter part of thi
week. Miss Marguerite will be able
to give many interesting narratives
of her trip abroad during this sum
mer, anel her experience in the war
zone, and no doubt she will be (piitc
busy answering cpiestions.
Among the Cape society folks who
will attend the wedding of Miss Ruth
Stokesand Wade Kochtitzky at Mal
elen Wednesday, are: Mr. anel Mrs. Al
len Oliver, Misses Rose Leming and
Ruth Glenn and Messrs. Benson Ilar
elesty and Russell Pcarmcmt. This
wedding thought quiet, will be one of
the prominent social events of the
season, as it unites two of the most
popular members of both Maiden and
Cape's social set. Miss Stokes will
have as her maid of honor, her sister,
Miss Roberta Stokes, and as her
maids, Miss Mary Kochtitzky and
Miss Laura Keller. Mr. Otto Kochtit
zky will be the best man.
One of the most enjoyable meetings
of the Bridge club was that of Tues
day afternoon when Mrs. William A.
O'Brien was hostess to the club. An
unusually splendid game was played
the honors going to Mrs. Robert Lam-
kin and. Mrs. S. B. Hunter, and ne, a
guest prize to Mrs. WM'am H. Hani
son. Mrs. O'Brien is a charming and
capable young matron, and the elabor
ate luncheon served the gntsts at the
close of the game, brought many pret
ty compliments from the lad;ea pres
ent. Those enjoying tne aiiernoon
were Mesdames R. L. Lamkin, Iska
Carmack, S. B. Hunter, Edward Ro
zier, W. H. Harrison, J. P. Meyers,
Williams Bryan; Misses Hazel Harri
son, Alice Griffith, Marie Weber, Mary
Wilson, Dorothy Bell.
Mrs. P. B. Leming left Tuesday for
St. Louis, where she will do her winter
shopping. . .
Mrs. Leuer of Poplar Bluff, is visit
ing her daughter, Mrs. Walter Albert.
LOCAL ANDPERSONAL
C. C. Walter of Danville, 111., is. in
the city on a business trip.
Franz E. Lindquist, an attorney
from Kansas City, was in the Cape
yesterday on legal business.
W. E. Johnson of Chicago," was a
business visitor in this city yesterday.
A. R. Byrd of San Antonio, Tex.,
was a business visitor in this city yes
terday. A. B. Tindley of Elsinore, transact
ed business in this city yesterday.
J. W. Hickel of Torre Haute, was
in the city yesterday looking after
some business interests.
J. H. Jones and John Wiley of, St.
Louis, were business visitors in this
city yesterday.
Miss B. McClonelon of Sturdivant,
was in the Cape yesterday attending
to some legal matters.
Thelma Peterson oZ St. Louis, visit
ed friends in this city yesterday.
E. K. Gibbs of Lilbourn, was in the
city yesterday doing some shopping.
L. F. Lafort of Conran, was a busi
ness visitor in tins city yesterday.
F. L. Fagan of Poplar Bluff, trans
acted business in this city yesterday.
John Powell of Illmo, visited friends
in this city yesterday.
Clement G. Smith of Illmo, trans
acted business in this city yesterday.
W. L. Haynes of Easton, 111., was in
this city yestenlay on a business trip.
Charles Ives of New Boston, 111.,
was a business visitor in this city yes
terday. Steamer Cape Girardeau arrived
from St. Louis at 9 o'clock yesterday
morning.
Steamer Columbia, bound for St.
Louis, passed Cape Girardeau at 10
o'clock yesterday morning.
Steamer Stacker Lee arrived in the
Cape from St. Louis at 11 o'clock last
night, and took on board a carload of
cement feir shipment to points in the
south.
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Johnston of
Poplar Bluff, are visiting friends in
this city.
II. C. Junghaus and F. B. Pond of
St. Louis, are business visitors in this
city.
James A. Bradley of Kennett is in
the Cape on a business trip.
A. O. Cook of New Madrid, is a
business visitor in this city.
W. P. Christian of St. Louis, was in
the Cape yesterday attending to some
business matters.
Smith Meyers of East St. Louis,
was in this city yesterday looking af
ter some business interests.
J. F. Hall of Campbell transacted
business in this city yesterday.
K. A. MacKenzie of JoKct, 111., was
a business visitor in this city yester
day.
C. E. Patton of Chicago, transacted
business in this city yesterday.
A. R. Held of Murphysboro, was a
business visitor in this city yesterday
Mike Owen of St. Louis, was in this
city yestenlay on a business trip.
The two weeks old infant chilel of
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Whitener died
yeste-rday morning, and will be buried
at the citv cemetery this morning at
9 o'clock.
James Miller and his partner, Mr.
Lovell, drove to their farm near Gor
donviile yesterday to look after their
cattle.
Mrs. II. S. Doyle returned yesterday
from St. Louis where she has been
purchasing her new stock of fall
milinery.
E. P. Thomas of Fredericktown
formerly engaged in the undertaking
business in this city, arrivcel in the
Cape yesterday afternoon anel wiil
spend several days visiting with
friends and transacting business.
L. P. Drirkill of Oran, was a busi
ness visitor in this city yesterday.
D. Yankcr of Philadelphia, transact
ed business in this city yesterday.
Ernest A. Green of St. Louis, is in
this city on a business trip. :
W. W. Turner of Poplar Bluff, was
in this city yesterday looking after
some business interests.
Charles J. Rievcs of St. Louis trans
acted business in this city yesterday.
E. Swift of Little Rock, was a busi
ness visitor in this city yesterday.
Clarence Johnson, H. D. Salmon and
T. J. Wilkinsson of Charleston, were
in the city yesterday on a business
trip.
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Warner of Ben
ton, were in the city yesterday on a
shipping trip.
G. C. Hoffman of Seeialia, transacted
business in this city yesterday.
T. H. Comfort of St. Louis, was
in the city yesterday looking after
some business interests.
F. Geiger of St. Louis, is. a business
visitor in this city.
H. A. Strong of Clevelanel, Ohio,
was a business visitor in this city yes-
terdav.
H. D. Barton and Sherman Haupt
of St Louis, were visitors in this city
yesterday. R. J. Smith of Campbell, was in the
city yesterday on a business trip.
G. B. Cook of Fredericktown, visit
ed friends in thi scity yesterday.
M. K. Alston of Poplar Bluff, was in
the city yesterday on a business trip.
Herman A. Cohn of St. Louis, was
a business in this city yesterday.
James L. Stephens of Columbia,
Mo., is La the city on a business trip.
William E. Crane of Decatur is in
the city on a business" trip.
E. P. Thomas of Fredericktown
transacted business in this city yes
terday. George W. Graham of Farmington.
was in the city attending to some busi
ness matters yestenlay.
R. C. Newton of St. Louis., is a
business visitor in this city.
W. C. Street of Fruitland was in the
Cape yesterday on a shopping trip.
Martin G'ob of St. Louis, was a
business visitor in thi scity yesterday.
Joe Wctt cf Chaffee, was a business
visitor in this city yesterday.
B-r-r-r! It's getting rather chilly
and it's going to get colder right
along. A good stove makes the cold
est weather like summer, ami there
are no better stove math- than those
sold by the Al Erinkopf Fuinitur Co.,
at 533 Broadway.
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Sanders of
Blythesville, Ark., visited friends in
this city yesterday.
Roy E. Sibley of Dertoit, is in this
city on a business trip.
R. R. Myers of St. Mary's, is visit
ing frienels in this city.
L. H. Davis of Huntsville, xIa., ar
rived in this city yesterday after
noon from Jackson, his former hme,
where he has been visiting friends
and looking after business interests.
J. G. Irvin of Little Rock, was a
business visitor in this city yester
day. T. E. Gilmore, S. G. H. Taylor, Mr.
and Mrs. W. P. Johnson, C. E. Waller,
E. J. Gorelon, W. B. Rhodes and S. Sil
verstein of St. Louis, were visitors in
this city yesterday.
Walter Greenbaum of Cincinatti,
was in the city yesterday looking af
ter some business interests.
John VanArt of St. Louis, was a
business visitor in this city yesterday.
M. Haas of Sikeston, visited friends
in this city yesterday.
C. S. Prather of Advance, was a
business visitor in this city yesterday.
J. M. Toohey of Zeta, is in the city
on a business trip.
George Rodenmayer returned yes
terday from Scott County where he
has been for the past few days 1 jok
ing over his farming interests.
Frank Compas of Kelso arrived in
the Cape yesterday on his return
from St. Louis where he had been
attending the automobile show.
..Fred Collins of St. Louis, was a
business visitor in this city yester
day. Celestine Hahn, Mrs. Amelia Iahn.
and Mrs. Joe Hahn of Commerce, were
in the Cape yesterday on a shopping
trip.
L. L. Raymer of Canalou is a busi
ness visitor in this city.
Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Johnsen of
Rockford, III., are visiting friends in
this city.
A. T. Newton of Carthage, trar.sact
cel business in this city esteiday.
J. C. Henderson of Bell City, visited
frienels in the Cape yestenlay.
Mr. and Mrs. K. T. I'.i:itron f Kan
sas City, are visaing friends in this
city.
A. H. Barnes of Charleston, was a
business visitor in this city yester
day. William Spath of St. Louis, trans
acted business in this city yestenlay.
E. C. v reeling of Hanrrba!, .' as in
this city yesterday on a business trip.
Robert Cowan, manager of the
Princes Theater, eleparted for St.
Louis this morning, where he will
spend a few days assisting O. R. Poor
man of Mattoon, 111., in selecting the
necessary fixtures for a new theater
to be operated by Mr. Poorman in
Humboldt, 111.
C. C. Singly of St. Louis, was a
business visitor in this city yester
day.
Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Kernans of St.
Louis, arc in the city visiting their
daughter who is attending the Nor
mal school.
C. Myers of Chicago, transacted
business in this city yestenlay.
Have you noticed the tint of scarlet
in the maple trees? Weil, tnat s a
sign winter is on the way, anu you
must not let it find you witiii.ut a
good stove. Before you decide what
you are going to buy, inspect those
new ranges at the Al B: inkopf Furni
ture company, 533 Broadway.
I. S. Ambrose of Columbus, Ohio,
was a business visitor in this city yesterday.
Charles Evans of Oak Ridge, pass
ed through the Cape last night enroute
to Hot Springs, Ark., where he will
engage in the automobile business,
having recently purchased a garage in
that city.
S. Abernathy of Tuckcrman, Ark.,
was a business visitor in this city yes
terday. John Wiley of St. Louis, transacted
business in the Cape yesterday.
S. H. Whitman oi Chicago, was a
business visitor in the 'Cape yester
day. Fred Hopper of Sikeston, visited
friends in this city yestenlay.
Wash Miller of Oak Ridge, was in
the city yesterday on court matters.
W. H. Vernon returned yesterday
from St. Louis, where he has been on
a business trip for the past few days.
Lewis Foulk was arrested yesterday
by officer Edward Beevc on the charge
of operating a restaurant without a
license. His place of bu -ncrs va lo
cated in the basement, of the- Elk build
ing, and after his arrest, of'u-i ir- of
the Elks Realty company had the
place lockeel. They clal.v thai ro il!:
is an interloper and that he to.k over
the management and control of ;le
place w ithout their knewiei!ge or cm
sent. J. T. Hall of Campbell, is in the
: ity en a business trip.
Louis Tiuscus of St. Louis, trans
acted business in this city yesterday.
M. G. Moy of Senath, was in. the
city yesterday on a business trip.
D. C. Brierly and. V. C. Rickett of
Marble Hill, were business visitors mi
this city yestenlay.
J. C. Henderson of Bell City, war,
In the Cape yesterday looking after
business interests.
John A. Brennan of Keokuk, is u
business visitor in this city.
G. F. Wissman and Charles Her
man of St. Louis, were business- visit-
i ors in mis city yesiereiay.
R. J. Smith of Campbell, transacted
business in this eity yesterday.
J. A. Nuttington of Holcomb i.
busiuess visitor in this city.
W. A. Walsh and J. P. Holmbac'
cf St. Louis, were in the city yest
day on a business trip.
J. T. Hali of Cambpoll. liaasa.
business in this city yesterday.
C. A. Griggs of St. Francis, A
is in the city on a business trip.
J. L. Duelle y v Nettleton, Ark.,
in the city yesterd iy and disposed
carload of bananas to local dealei
V. I-'. Pracker of Yount. Mo..
in the city yestenlay on a bu.-iin
trip.
Charles Ilerron of Ferry vilic, wa. .
business visitor in this citv yesterday.
H. B. Jacoby of St. Lends, transa t
ed business in this city yesterday.
M. Akers of Cardwell, was in the
city yesterday on a business trip.
W. Edwards of Neely's Landing,
was in the Cape yesterday on a shop
ping trip.
L. F. Brenneim of Illmo, wa a
business visitor in this city yestenlay.
J. II. Mc.Mican and Lucille M.-Mica.i
of Orait. were in tie city yesterday do
ing sonic snopping.
T. B. Vo.;d of Wolf Lake, was a
business visitor n ths city yoterday.
L. L. Raymer of Canalou vi-itcd
friends in this city yestenlay.
S. L. Laync, a hotel man of Pine,
was in the city yestenlay on a busi
ness trip.
William I.ugge. a stove salesman of
Belleville; III, who has been visiting
Al Zimmc'r for the past few days, re
turned to his home yestenlay.
Ed Creasy of Piedmont, vi-ited
frienels in this city yesterday.
C. Bye of Bonne Torre, transacted
business in this city yeste rday.
J, D. Peril of Blodgett. was a busi
ness visitor in this city yesterday.
Lem Emmett of Brownwood, was in
the city yesterday on a shopping trip.
August Weber of Commerce, visited
friends in this city yesterday.
J. M. Diefenbach of Jackson, v a. a
business visitdr in this city yesterday.
Wm. Kinder of Allenvillt , transacted
business in this city yestenlay.
H. Stovall of Grand Tower, visited
friends in this city yesterday.
G. S. Hatch of Seventysix is a busi
ness visitor in this city.
C. E. Davis of St. Louis, transacted
business in this city yestereiay.
S. H. Meyers of Poplar Bluff, was in
this city yesterday on a business trip.
Judge D. I. Dyer and Clerk W. W.
Nail of St. Louis, arrived in this city
yesterday, preparatory to opening the
October term of Federal Court, now in
.session.
John E. Lynch, Irvine Mitchell, B.
L. White and Oscar E. Keneha'us of
St. Louis, are business visitors in thL
city.
W. K. Chandler of Marble Hill, is a
business visitor in th's citv.

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