OCR Interpretation


The weekly tribune and the Cape County herald. (Cape Girardeau, Mo.) 1914-1918, November 03, 1916, Image 1

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066617/1916-11-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Normal School,
Cape Girardeau, ilc-.
H K
WEEKLY
RIBUJNE
THE TRIBUNE'S CIRCULa.
TION IS THE LARGEST IN
CAPE GIRARDEAU, i i
THE TRIBUNE COVERS
SOUTHEAST MISSOURI
LIKE THE DEW. i i
A NEWSPAPER Til AT PRINTS ALL TOE NEWS THAT'S FIT TO PRINT AND PRINTS IT "FIRST
VOL. XV
THE CAPE COUNTY HERALD, CAPE GIRARDEAU MISSOURI, NOVEMBER 3. 1916.
NUMBER 43.
HUGHES ANSWERS
WILSON IN DASH
OVER N. Y. STATE
Says President's Record Is
Open for Criticism, if He
Has Made Mistakes.
GREAT CROWDS GREET
CANDIDATE ON TOUR
Declares He Will Carry New York
and Ohio at Next Tues
day's Election.
Special Dispatch to The Triune.
Albany, X. Y.f Nov. 2. Charles
Evans Hughes dashed through the
State, on his final appeal to the Xew
York voters today and was greeted
with immense crowds in every city and
hamlet. Every village through which
his train passed had been elaborately
decorated with flags and bunting, and
the candidate was given an enormous
reception, j
Thousands were at every station that
the candidate's train passed. He an
swered President Wilson's criticism of
bringing the Government's foreign re
lations into politics. Hughes declared
that as this country chooses a new
President every four years, the peo
ple had a right to discuss and even
agitate the measures passed by the
out-going administration as well as the
country's diplomatic relations.
"If the President has bungled his
work, he is open to criticism," declared
the Republican nominee. A President's
record must stand on its own leg?,
ft cannot hide behind the theory that
what is done by the executive and his
advisers is nobody's business but their
own."
"I have returned from a trip through
Ohio and Indiana," he said, with a
profound sense of gratification and en
tire confidence with respect to the re
sult in both states. I am not uneasy
as to what New York will do.
"In both Ohio and Indiana, it is not
exaggerating to say, I had receptions
which perhaps exceeded those accord
ed to any other presidential candidate.
That was, of course, as I said last
night, not a tribute to me personally,
but it was indication of the deep in
terest the people are taking in the
essential conditions of their prosperity
and their satisfaction that there is a
great reunited Republican party ready
for service at this critical time.
"So far as promises go, no one can
exceed the promises of our opponents,
but we measure what they say by
what they have done."
Hughes assailed the Democratic par
ty for failure to reduce the high cost
of living, "as promised four years
ago," and for extravagance.
"They tell us now," he c6ntinued,
"that tiny are going to deal with eco
nomic problems that confront us at
this time in a satisfactory manner, but
if we endeavor to ascertain by what
principle they are to be guided, we
look in vain. I propose to tell you by
what principles we shall be guid 'd."
Hughes then reiterated the policies
which he intends to follow if elected.
Hughes made five speeches in In
diana yesterday in winding up his cam
paign in the Middle West. The last
was to a crowd which filled the Wig
wam at Terre Haute, and followed a
long parade which the candidate re
viewed. Hughes devoted much of his
speeches yesterday to the tariff is
sue, declaring that the Underwood bill,
if allowed to remain in effect after the
war, would produce souphouses and
bread lines. He discussed the Adam
son bill at length in his night address,
declaring that while he understood.
union labor had been told officially to
vote for Wilson, he knew nobody could
direct or control the labor vote, and
that it would be cast according to its
sober judgment.
FORDHAM TO HAVE
ITS OWN "PLATTSBURG
New York, Oct. 2. Fordham Uni
versity, in this city, is to establish a
summer military training camp pat
terned after the Plattsourg institution,
if President Mulry obtains the consent
of the trustees. Dr. Mulry is a tearty
advocate of preparedness. The camp
will be open to any college student.
Although Fordham is inside this
metropolis, it is able to assign twenty
acres exclusively to the camp, besides
giving the rookies the use of eighty
acres more of the college camtus. Un
less something unforseen prevents, the
camp will start next June.
MAN IS KILLED
IN A QUARREL
OVER A $1-FEE
City Marshal at Walnut Ridge
Shoots Resturant Owner
in Back.
WANTED TO COLLECT
ON AN IMPOUNDED HOG
Bullets Break Spine-Sherfff Ar
rests Marshal and Mob
is Rumored.
As the result of a quarrel over a
$1 impounding fee for a hog owned by
a restaurant man in Walnut Ridge,
Ark., the city marshal there Wednes
day morning shot and killed the res- .
taurnantcur instantly. The marshal,
according to the story of the shoot
ing that was brought to the Cape yes
terdjy by members of the Frisco train
crews, was placed under arrest and
there was danger of a mob forming to
take him from the hands of the sheriff.
Walnut Ridge is a small town a mile
on the other side of Hoxie on the Fris
co. The city has a new stock law
which has been in eiTect but a few
weeks. It provides for taking all ani
mals that stray on the public roads or
streets to the pound and a fee of $1
is exacted in order that the owner may
obtain them.
A hog belonging to the restaurant
proprietor, whose name was not learn
ed, escaped from its pen Wednesday.
The marshal saw the animal on the
street, but a short time later, the 1!
year old son of therestauranteur start
ed in pursuit.
The boy caught the hog and started
driving it homeward, when Le was ac
cost2d by the marshal who claimed the
$1 impounding fee. The boy told the
marshal that his father would have
to settle the fee.
The marshal thereupon went to the
father, a man about OS years old. and
asked for the fee. The old man re
fused to pay. A quarrel resulted and
the old man turned his back upon the
marshal and stalled to walk away.
He had taken but a few steps when
the marshal drew his revolver and
fired point blank at the old man. The
victim fell to the ground and by the
time anyone reaclfrd his side, he was
dead.
One of the bullets struck his back
bone between the shoulder blades and
came out of his chest. The other bul
let penetrated at the back of his neck
and came out at tie tljroat. Roth bul
lets had broken his spinal column.
A short time after the shooting, the
sheriff arrested the marshal to hold
him for the Coroner's jury. The mar
shal about three weeks ago, it was re
ported, s'hot and killed a negro.
C. F. CRFAVS HOMESTEAniXG
Boatman Caes to Leranta, Ark., to
Get Swamp Land from (iot ranicnt.
C. V. Crews, the boat man who, for
many seasons operated the motor boat
that plies in the passenger trade be
tween the Cape and Thebes, for the
last month has been homesteading a
quarter section of land in Southwest
ern Arkansas, it was learned yester
day. He now is located at Lepanta, Ark.,
and his homestead is located about 20
miles from the town. He has to travel
overland by wagon in order to reach
his place.
The place that he is obtaining from
the Federal Government under the
homestead rights is a valuable piece
of swamp land which, when he obtains
title, will be worth several hundred
dollars.
As a part of the homesteading, he is
required to live for a part of each
year for five consecutive years on the
place and make certain improvements
on the farm. In his absence from the
Cape, his' sons will continue to op
erate the R. C. until ice forces them
to put the boat in dry dock.
FAMOUS GERMAN ACTOR.
PRISONER, GIVES SHOW
Derne, Nov. 2. After more than two
years' absence, Alexander Moissi, Ger
many's most famous actor, has appear
ed on the stage again, although he still
is a prisoner of war. When the war
began the great artist entered the ar
my as a member of the aviation corps.
He made many successful flights and
HE GAVE US PROSPERITY. THE HEADACHE
l "n. i ii;nt : JL'lti: ly John T. .ic uii-ivon.
urn I t Mii'iiiiwwi rj v . ku l r i i l i i i l x - i
MERCHANTS TO HOLD
ELECTRICITY WEEK
...i :.!Robt. Vonelsani! Brings Three
Special ton1Dm.ee iu i,.Ka,c
Parade-Week of Dec.
2 to 9.
lape ijiranieau ieiau h-ium....- ,
1 I. .- 4 . i
who met last nieht at the Commercial j
Club rooms letermined to participate ,
in the National Electric Week Decern-1
i
ber 2-!). when a trades parade, i"umi-;
natel by electricity, may be niven
Plans for the Cape electricity celebra.
IIUII .H1 l. .... ...... j - - i
...imiittna nii.Vlt :ic limned llV i
. , ,.r.,, ,
l resident n. U. Winer io ini.-Mu;da :
., f t, , , r,.
the possibilities of the movement Joi
the Cape.
Sam Sherman was named as chair-
. c it., I..1
...a., m u.t s-,--. -
other members are k. r.. I.. i.amKin
. .
and A. 1 . JJehrens.
The committee will consult with A- j of the thrpp whjch AI,. Vogelsang
M. Tinsley, local manager of the Pub- lin.ui.hli ll0 lrtained one of them, As
lic Utilities Company, seeking to Io-jsistunt Cashipr Kcmpe of thp Farmers.
termine if there is time for an electric j an(, jIert.hants. jank retained one and
parade to be organized by the time the ; w w Hinchpv ;-.Pcretarv of the Retail
luectricity week is ceie.nv.teu.
If it decided that the lack of time
for preparation of floats for the parade
will make it impossible to have that
feature, the efforts of the merchants
will be centered upon their individual
co-operation with the celebration in
the way of store decorations. The
merchants as individuals expect to
have extra electrical displays in any
event, for that week.
Mr. Tin.-lry and Mr. Waddington, a
member of the Socieyt of Electrical !
Development, appealed before the as- i
sociation to explain the details of the!
week's celebration. j
The Public Utilities Company will
head the list of electric displays with
a feature that will disclose new ideas
in the use of electricity in the Cape.
The meeting was attended by " mem
bers. was decorated with the Iron Cross, but
finally fell into the hands of the French
15 months ago. Recently he was sent
to Switzerland, because his health had
become undermined by his long cap
tivity. In Arosa, where he is interned with
several thousand other German pris
oners, he arranged a theatrical per
formance. Supported by amateurs
from the ranks of his comrades and
lellow-prisoners he gave scenes from
Goethe's "Iphigania," Schiller's "Den
Carlos" and Shakespeare's "Hamlet."
He was at his best and received a tre
mendous ovation.
k; Ppii J
-rrH re'-tl- iUTT-Ti "m..,-ii f TTi 1 n ' , Trttrrmi
NEW DIME IS HERE;
LOOKS LIKE MEDAL:
- -
toms hro LouIS to
Cpe.
The new ilinu h:i m nvi'il in ill'
(. (, .njili. ei.rl.t lmndi-eil ilnu-
.,,,,1 4iir ,,,.,11-1;,, silver eoins h.-ivo
been struck oh" by tne U. S. mint at i
Pniladelphia and now
are working;'
itK.;.. .. .... i. ...... .,-i,,.,,t
llini tl IIIIU L 1 I -lltAlI.'ll lUU'Ml.nril.
.
ine ctiuiury.
The dime has the appearance of be-
inifr :i -ma s ver mn a ra 1 ier than a
In the character of its work-
maiishin, it presents a combination of!
- ,
: i"'V am o i Ktoas in coin-niaKin'
,
to
I i hi jusl oi tiie n-u-irui tvi
. .
j arrive in the Cape were brought onjin a condition tnat gave Ins iamily
; llir. ufn.imnr f' iw. ( 1 1" i"i filo-i i -in,! h- (riwit 'llflfnl lift :i sli'-llt i 111 1 1 1'OVe 111 e t
1 " '
j Robert Vogelsanil. cashier of the
Vogelsand
, , .
f armers and Merchants Hank, who
'brouuht three from St. Louis.
. AIorchants- Association and Hroadway
j merchant, got the third.
Casper Sander also got one from a
man who came down on the steamer
Peoria when it touched here Wednes
day. The face of the dime presents a I
woman's head, the features of "Liber
ty." In large letters around this face
is spelled the word "Liberty."
On the reverse side of the dime is
the figure of the old Roman insignia
of the courts of law and justice
wreathed about with laurel, the flower
of victory.
The milling on the edge of the coin
j follows the old style with the corru
gated edges. The figures on lioth sides
of the coin are raised in relief against
the background of the coin and at the
edge, the surface of the coin also is
raised so that when two of the coins
ase pressed together, the figures
stamped on the faces do not touch.
This is to facilitate the handling of
them in stacks by bankers and others
who have a large supply of dimes.
NEW YORK POLICEMEN
BUILD FLOATING STATION
New York. Nov. 2. With their own
hands. New York City's versatile blue
coats have built the first floating police
station in the world.
The station, formerly a barge, will
contain sleeping quarters for the re
serves a large desk room, a lounging
cabin and a wireless apparatus
WILL COME LATER
WILSHOrVS
PRosPERVrJ
v
THOMAS E. CLARK
IS SERIOUSLY ILL
i f..,: : . r
;iaii .S ouu.uB ..urn
Heart Attack-In Bed
: Twii Vpfl.
I imir.as l ( lark. tia weil-kiiown
l-kn.
! irusic dealer, v ho has been critically ,
t his home on .Merrr.vt tlier street
... . .
for two weeks with heart trouble, was
iv,::ri iiiiiu'owi
I vesteidav. He was
" . - -
;ilil. tn it uF in Iwil iluri"r tl.'e :il'tev-
v "- "i f- -
noon, and his physician believes he I.-
!'" " (' " '""" 'J-
.Mr. Clark was stricken more than
two weeks ap and for several days;
ihis condition was precarious. It was
for more than a week that he H'-cd
:
w as notice.l last week and sine- that
time lie h
beer, gradually growing i
.tnffiger.
Mr. Clark h
heart trouble
never before
,s so!!':-:eil from or:;ni'
for many years, but
I tas his condition been
regarded as critical. The malady i.
know n as angina pectoris, or harden-
of the arteries around the heart.
' '
j j WOII GLTS OLD HOOK
A book which lacks but six yean of :
being a century old yesterday w as i
presented to Mavor Kage bv Kdward '
The' executive added the
Ruehmann
volume tr his librarv which alreadv in.
clud-s several books which were print -
ed and published about 100 years ago.
The Mayor keeps them as interest -
ing archives of which he has a large
collection in his off.ee. The book was
obtained by Mr. Ruehmann in a con -
signment of scraps and .iunk. One of
his employes picked it out of some
papers that had been sent to the junk
yard.
1 he hook is entitled: I he .Masonic ;,
Miscellany and Ladies' Literary Maga-1
zine, a periodical publication devoted
to Masonic and General Literature." It !
was volume I of the series and includ
ed numbers of the magazine from July,
1821, to June, 1S22, inclusive. It was
printed at Lexington, Ky., by William
Gibbes Hunt.
The book contains several hundred
pages which are yellowed by age. The
binding is in calfskin of the character
that was used in early book-making,
and still is in excellent condition.
reach headquarters in emergency, 'i nv
boat will be the central station for all
police boats operating in the East and
Harlem rivers. It will be moored near
Randall's Island.
U-BOATS TO TAKE G. 0. P. NOMINEES
I WARSHIPS PLACE, WILL HOLDRALLY
IKOENIG PREDICTSilN CAPE TONIGHT
Commander of the Deutsch-; David AY. Hill and County
land Says Sea Battles Must j Candidates to Speak at
i be Fought with Submarines : "Candidates' Party
I TOLD KAISER U. S. ALL PARTY NOMINEES
j WAS KIND TO HIM ! WILL ATTEND RALLY
! Please Willi the Neutrality of the;
! American, He Tells
' Reporter.
i Special Dispatch to The
i mune
i
! Now London, Conn.. Nov.
: Koenig of the Deatschiand
!. ("apt.
believes
! w ith unquestioning faith that the ir
, man war submarine is yet destined to
; phy
. war.
a deciding part in the world !
i "In the next grr-at naval battle be-
jtween the German fleet and the Urit-
is h.
iie aid "the submarine will play !
j the hiirsest part. Tiiis is a brand
! new era. The nun for the nation;
j which now places faith in bi.ar baitie-j
' shins are blind. The rreat cruisers ar.d
i dreadnoughts are no use. The Anier-
i
. ican navy is not blind. The Amei-
, i-.-an navy sees what some have .-till
I to se?, that t!:e suomanne is toe ves
irel of the future: that we live today
m
i vew naval era."
'Tell us about the Hiv-mcn.
i,.
I asked. "The P.riti.-ii sav the cam
i her and she is now i i ISrilish port."
j '"Tin' llremen." n piied ('apt. Ivonit;-.
i"I do not know it is true she .-ailed
with fuel and provision- for ('At days
and sixty days have nt passed since
l she left l.retricn. nut I tmnk .-ne i.-.
I l).-t. Yes, 1 am willing to sav
l lost."
i "lint the Uritish did not g.t her. Xo.
sThey neither captur-l her nor sunk
ihor. It was not due to them that .-he
'did not make the trip. Of that i am t
t
positive."
j "I low w as .she lo.-t?"
T!u ( ai)tai!n,(,sitated before he .-aid.
n, ,.lians hp ,trut.k a mi!, po1-
I ; -: ....t;r,, minn P. iIimiw
ii .-. i 1 1 - . l i m , ' . ....... r
. 'it it
i .
ii w as the weatiier. iii'-iiiinp i Minn
is that the p.rit.'.-h ilid not p--t I'.er.
J H A III' I M:'.. II. .1. ' '
II 1.. I ' 1 I 1 1 . t I
!;..-t
; ,v' "
... . . .. . !...
j "011 i.eueve wunoir. iue.-Le.o
! the submarine wni oe tne i,.2;iuin ves-
sel, not the lartre l)attles!np .
! "I dr.- vour American navy sees it.'
Will submarines he built larger and
' i;U -r.n-
as another oue.-ti..n.
., ,
n. ()-i itn v. i ne war na.- i -sim-
, , , - ,: .,i,1,.,.f-,.i ..vi-l.mnient of the
; ,, f t) ,ui)Zma, ie. It has j
: -)in poun,j wiceable for Us;
I .. . i ,. . .1 1. ..
not
The
jtllollglU Oi neioie ine Nai o. -4..e
development of submarines w !!
tinue as it is continuing now."
(fill- i
"Tl'.e Kaiser invited yoo to di'i-
him." suggested th? correspondent.
."We would like you to tell us ot that
i dinner."
! "Teli us what the Kiser gave you
j for dinner," asked a reporter.
! "It was a very simple meal." he re-
plied.
"What did the Kaiser say t yoti
about America and the American Gov
ernment?" was the next question.
I said to him how nicely the Amcr-
j ican people had treated me," dodged i
i Capt
Koenig witr.out a tremoi. i
; told him how strictly neutral the
j Americans were and how good they
! had been to me and about everything
it hey had done for me."
! "But what flii' the Kaiser say to you !
j of America ?" persisted the reporter.
i 4.jje jjstrnP,j to my account of Amer-
j cans- liU( that was ail that a dozen
i otlor questions asked w ith the same
j purpose got from the Knight of Hohen-
' Is the Kaiser pale and thin?" ask
ed a Baltimore reporter. "The Kaiser
is a little white," said Capt. Koenig,
"but he is in the best of health and
spirits."
"How long does he think the war
will last?"
"I think it will last at least another
year."
"Does the Kaiser believe that Ger
many will win; did he say anything
about that?"
"Over in Germany we all hope to
win this war."
"What do you think of the Jutland
naval fight, was it a German victory?"
"Wre sunk 1S0.000 tons; they 80,000,
was that a victory?"
ct. Louis
Closes Campaign Here
Monday Evening.
! This will he "Candidates Xiu'nt" in
: the ( ape. Every Republican ca:vii
! date in the county is expected to be
i present at a rally to be held at the
Courthouse tonight, when David W.
Mil!, the Republican nominee for Con-
; g
ress. wii! snea
il-
j 'I h.
Kepiiblican leader are expert-
in- to make the rally one of the bo. I
that has been hold here thU campaign.
I, wi'l lir the iirst titie a meetiiiL' has
been held in this citv for the benei;
of ih.e count v nominees and at v i;
t.(. i-a-i.iidate.-.- appeari'd its cat
ta;lu.r-
Til folio w ini;- nominees have been i'i
vied to attend the meeting .ind make
: ,1 l" alu l"
.--noit talks: uinn Wilson, amii-ii'i
for State Senator; Kdward l. May.-,
Circuit .Tudue; John A. Snider. Cunt
mon 1'iea.- .Iin'ire; Harry W. Hiidtres.
Le.i.-latui e; C. .Jacob Keller and Philip
C. Katen. candMatis for County
.Iudv.es; .). Henry Caruther-. Piosec-it-
in'j- Ailorrv v: Krnest Caldwell.
''s ; sessov; J. 15. Clans Kerstner. Treasur
er: ilemv J. nri'.dionf. Sherilf; Ar
thur Poe, Coroner, and Charles H'att
ni r. Public Admini.-trator.
11. H. Haas, vice cha;rman of thv
it oilfliv onimuiee. inn oh -iiii- i i i-
j organization from this cit, will pre
jside over the nieetintr. The rally wns
, :unnio) bv M,-. Haa and (he H.
t,sre,. of the Count, Com-
.. -i. -i i,... : ii,; . ..;t.- v...,L.
i i ii ; i Lee. .m .in i im i i'i v 1 .
. ... . . t
((.r,-., comp'aitus aoout n.n navinir
j Jioar.l any of the local candidates, and
,il(. Mieetiil" was the result.
Harry H. Meyer, of Little Pck,
Ark., supet intenJent of the C.o em
inent Ileservation at Hot Sprintrs.
j Ark., under former President latt.aml
, D a i-iit V. Davis, former St. l.ouls
J l'ark Commissioner, w.l! b" tne prm-
I 1 . T A A-.. I. . . . . 1. 1 .... n ....II..
" P-
I I lull v. ill o-- in- (i ii: i I:'- i u i i. "
! Mondav night.
Chairman F. K. Kies and H. H. Haas
yesterday received a telegram from
John K. Swanger, of the Speakers' P.'i
reau of the Republican State Commit
tee, announcing that the two sneakers
will be in the Cape in the evening and
'at Jack.-on in the afternoon.
Republican leaders in the Cape yes
terday afternoon predicted a sweeping
victory for their ticket in this county.
"Judge Lamm will run from J.V t
200 ahead of Hughes and the rest of
the ticket in the count." one declared.
"The entire ticket will be elected by a
majority of about W0 and from indi
cations available now. it is a toss-up
to whether Cant. Bridces or Clai
, K,. ., .:n the ountv ticket."
C PK NORMALS TO ST. LOT IS
Courleux's Football Team will Baltic
with C. B. C. Tomorrow.
Under the direction of Coach Fer-
,manfi ('ourleux. the Cape Normal
football aggregation will depart for
s;t. Louis this afternoon where they
play the streng Christian Brothers
('ollege eleven tomorrow afternoon.
The Norma! players have whipped
ino good form this week after th -ir
defeat last week at Hip hands of the
heavy Carbonda'e team. Several of
ihe men wee bruised considerably by
fW attack of their heavier opponents,
bnt they have recovered this week so
!tln they will be able to put one of the
strongest teams of the season against
the brothers tomorrow.
Last year the Brothers defeated the
Cape team by a lopsided score, when
they played in St. Louis.
FIFTEEN rOUND BABY BORN
A 1 o-pound son was born to Mr.
and Mrs. Christy, who live on the Ma
rion Slinkard farm, east of town.
Dwight F. Davis of

xml | txt