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The Hayti herald. (Hayti, Mo.) 1908-1922, January 07, 1909, Image 6

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THE HAYTI HERALD
$1.00 A YEAR IN ADVANCB.
HAYTI, : : : : : MISSOURI.
The News in Brief.
Five thousand Memphis Iiulinns
raised nn. immense relief fuiul for
stricken Italy last week.
Memphis expects to entertain
President-elect Tnft next month on
his return from l'anamn.
Wabash county, l'ndiann, tho first
to vote under the county option law,
went dry by S'J7 majority.
A bill is being prepared by lead
ing Democrats in Oklahoma looking
to the disf r.mehi?einent of the negro.
The State of Alabama went "dry"
at midnight December 30. Liquor
interests propose to fight the pro
hibitory law, however.
ICuffoI E. Gardner, the "Manner
buggy manufacturing king, has
been sued at St. Louis for divorce
by his wifo who alleges desertion,
mistreatment and other offenses.
The question of whether or not a
wife can testify for trials was raised
in the night rider trials at Union
City and decided adversely, but the
wives of some of the offenders were
permitted to testify to an alibi for
other defendents.
1. M. Johnson, who was serving
n life sentence in the Texas peni
tentiary for murder and was par
doned "by Governor Campbell, about
two weeks ago, likes the social life
of the prison so well that he has so
far refused to accept his liberty.
President-elect Tuft has effectual
ly put a quietus on the desire which
was beginning to develop into ac
tivitv to organize "Tnft clubs"
throughout the South. .Mr. Tnft
doubts the wisdom of encouraging
at this time political activity in any
form.
Uobbers, heavily armed, blew the
cafe in the City Bank at Wellston,
Okla., and escaped with $2,000. The
thieves erected n barbed wire fence
around the building and got away
after a fierce pistol battle with the
citizens in which 200 shots were
exchanged.
Six hundred Kansas farmers have
taken possession of the big agricul
tural college and are studying and
discussing the problems and methods
of farming at their annual institute,
held at Manhattan under the auspi
ces of the extension department of
the college.
Oklahoma Socialists have decided
on a system of education that con
templates the teaching of Socialism
from the grass root up. Every local
organization in the State is instruct
ed to organize a school for children,
the latter to bo put in classes and
grades, according to their ability to
comprehend the principles and to be
instructed by competent teachers.
Sessions of these schools are to be
held once a week.
Ueturns from eleven locomotive
builders in the United States and
Canada show a total of 2,3-12 en
gines, about the same relative fall
ing off as in the cars built. Of
the 2j424 built in the United
States, 1,(ifi8 were for domestic use
and -IM! for export. These figures
include electric and seventy-nine
compound locomotives. The Cana
dian engines. 218, were all for
domestic service. Of these twenty
wero compound.
Mrs. William Marshall filed a
hreneh-of-promisc suit in the Dis
trict Court at Muskogee against
Frank A. Castnnian, president of the
Bank of Braggs, Okla., and a weal
thy Inml owner of Sapulpn, asking
for .$15,000. She charges that Casta
niun agreed to marly her and broke
faith. She asks $20,000 for breach
of promise, $10,000 damages for ill
treatment, $10,000 on another alle
gation and $5,000 on general princi
ples. Mrs. Marshall is a Cherokee
woman and lias valuable pioperty in
ihe oil fields near Lcnnpali.
Work has begun on tho erection
of tho new 10-story Lee Hotel at
Oklahoma City, This will be one
of the largest and finest hotels in
the Southwest.
B. A. Urcakbill, a collector, was
shot at through a window while
talking to an attorney in a hotel at
Jilnncliiud, Okla. The bullet pass
ed just beneath the heart.
With the arrival of Senator
Knox at Augusta, Ga., .January G
or 7, Tnft's cabinet-making coun
cil will be in session and cabinet
announcements may be looked for.
After repealed notices served
upon him not to &ell cotton below
10 cents, night riders destroyed the
barn of V. A. Buck, in Pottawato
mie county. Buck recently came
from Iowa.
Nearly 100,000 lives were lost
and a vast area of land, including
teveral cities, towns and villages,
were destroyed in an earthquake
which followed a flood and fire in
South ltalv and the island of Sic
ily The election recently held in Tcx
arkana, Texas, at which n .yJOO
bond isue for street improvement
was carried by an overwhelming ma
jority, has been declared void on a
technicality by the attorney general
of Texas.
William Hill, aged 50 years, was
shot and killed at Ishani, on the
Kentucky-Tennessee state line, by
his stepson, William Sowders, aged
lo years, who was protecting his
mother from injury at the hands
of Hill.
Mrs. Lucy Johnson of Lola, Ivy.,
recovered $200 from William F.
Paris Jr. for a kiss he stole from her
on St. Patrick's day. She asked
-$2,000. One juror thought the kiss
worth not less than $300. With
costs added, Mr. Paris will find the
kiss worth about $G00.
The nlarming conditions which
have called out stfate troops and
United States marshals at the min
ing town of Stearns, Whitely coun
ty, Ky., are creating some discus
sion in the war department over
the probability of a condition aris
ing to call for United Slates
courts.
The second floor, of a two-story
building at Kllicott City, Md., fell
through during the hearing before
Justice H. II. Wallen, of William
Pumpwood, a negro charged with
murderous assault. It is estimated
that about fifteen persons ha'vo
broken legs and arms.
Eleven pair of Hungarian par
tridges, supplied by the United
States Government, ha-ve been re
ceived at the Wichita Forest He
serve, in Comanche County, Okla
homa, by Superintendent Frank
Hush and liberated. They will be
protected for two years in the re
serve for breeding purposes. They
will then be trapped and distributed
to various sections of the State.
The birds tire about twice the mzo
of ordinary mail and more prolific.
President Uoosevelt and over
(i,000 people, lepresenting every
land and every state and territory
in the Union, exchanged happy
Xew Year greetings at the White
House. For three and a half hours
the president stood receiving his
guests, and when the reception was
ended last year's record of attend
ance had been broken by over 700.
Many men and women distinguished
in the oflicial and social life of
Washington were present.
Governor Charles K. Hughes was
Friday inducted for a second term
as chief executive of Xew York.
Among the invited guests on the
platform wero the governor's par
ents, the Hev. David C. and Mrs.
Hughes, the lit. Uev. Thomas, M.
A. Burke, the lit. Hev. Thomas M.
A. Burke, Itoninn Catholic bishop
of Albany, tho Hev. Hiclinrd II.
Xelson, bishop coadjutor of the Pro
testant Episcopal dioceuse of Al
bany, and Chairman Timothy L.
Woodruff pf tho Uopublicnu State
Committee.
Charles P. Taft and Senator
Fornker withdrew from the Ohio
senatorial race, leaving n clear Held
for Congressman Thco Burton.
Bench Hargis, charged with the
murder of his father, Judge James
Hargis, waB admitted to $25,000
bail at Irvine, Ky. lie will go to
Hot Springs, Ark., for his health.
Xew Mexico and Arizona arc pre
paring for another brilliant dash
for statehood after the close of the
holiday recess. This time they will
be for two slates instead of one.
Both territories are hopeful of suc
cess. Xew Mexico has been trying
lot almost sixty years to get into the
Union and Arizona for almost hulf
of that time.
Carleton B. Hazard, a wealthy
Virginian, who lives on a thirty-acre
subuiban tract near Bock Creek
Park, where his young daughter
takes daily rides has written a let
ter to President Uoosevelt accusing
him of mistreating his daughter
while horseback riding. The presi
dent had merely asked the girl to
lake another road.
Surveys are being made from
DeVall's Bluff to Pine Bluff and
from Lonoke to Pine Bluff. It i
understood that rights of way are
being bought through the territory
in which the surveys are being made
and that in all probability roads will
he built from these two points south
into Pine Bluff.
The public school building at
Conway, which has been in course of
constiuction for some time, is nearly
completed. The roof is completed
and nearly all the rooms in the
building have been plastered. Sev
eral rooms will lie ready for oc
cupancy in February.
For the first time in 200 years,
Biloxi, Miss., is without saloons, the
seven that were openating here go
ing out of business Xew Years Day,
when statutory prohibition became
effective in Mississippi. One saloon
is adorned with huge bunches of
crepe and the legend "Gone, but not
forgotten."
The Kentucky Anti-saloon League
urges its constituents to circulate
petitions addressed to Gov. Wilson,
asking for a special session of the
Legislature to pass the uniform
county unit bill, and not to include
in the call any such measures as the
redisricting bill which would serve
to embarrass the county unit nuias
ti re, as did happen at the last regu
lar session. Gov. Wilson is said to
have already expressed his willing
ness to act upon the petitions, upon
which the league has already been
at work.
The Chicago Typographical Un
ion has taken action on the jail sen
tence imposed on President Gom
pcrs and others of the American
Federation of Labor. The paper in
dorsed by the printers calls on Con
gress to "frame n law that will
curb the 'power hunger' of the
judges."
Fire destroyed the sawmill plant
and large basket factory of the
Lovelace Lumber Company at
Brewton, Ala. The estimated loss
is $-200,000 or $550,000. partially
insured. The plant was one of the
largest and best equipped in the
south. The origin of the fire is un
known. Secretary of War Luke E. Wright
will do all he can to secure the es
tablishment of an army post in
Memphis, in accordance with his
promise made to a special commit
tee of tho Business Men's Club,
and those who have conversed with
him expect him to take the subject
up at once with his usual vigor.
Assistant State Mine Inspector
Edward Flynn of Alabama esti
nmted that the Alabama coal pro
duction in 1008 will show a falling
off of two million tons as compar
ed with the production last year,
Business depression and the recent
miners' st.-ike caused the decrease.
The production in 10'2 was above
$1,000,000 tons,
PENSIONS BREAK ALL RECORD
$105,894,040.03 Paid Out 338,341
Namoa Addod to Rolls.
Washington. Expenditures by tho
United States lust year for pensions
broke, nil records since 1893, according
to the report of .Initios It. Gnrficld, sec
retary of the interior, made public Mon
day. To 1, 000,0." II pensioners there wns
paid $155,8!4,040.G3.
In consequence of the act of Febru
ary 0, lilOT, which extended the pension
limit, the pension ollicc has been be
sieged by nn army of 413,133 applicants,
of whom 338,341 succeeded in getting
their nnuics on the pay roll. Death
wiped oir 54,300 names and at the close
of the year there wore 951,CS7 dependent
upon the government's bounty.
Only two names rcuinin on the pen
.sion list ns a sequel of the Kovolution
ary war. They are tho two daughters
of the sole Revolutionary widow, who
died November 11, 1000. The last pen
sioned soldier of the war of 1S12 died
May 13, 1003, but the roll btill con
tains tho names of 471 "lSlU" widows.
ARE LIVING AS JESUS WOULD
1,000 Young Clevelanders
Havo
Undertaken tho Task.
Cleveland, O. For the next two weeks
11,000 voting people of the city will en
deavor to live ns they believe Jesus
would live were he on earth. Sunday
night at Kpworth Memorial Church
1,S00 delegates from the Christian En
deavor Society and the Baptist Young
People's Union gathered, and stirred by
impasbioncd appeal by the Hew W. 13.
Wallace, leader in the movement,
pledged their services and their organiza
tions to follow in the footsteps of Jesus.
In his address Rev. Mr. Wallace point
ed the way for the young people to fol
low. In making tho experiment they
must lead a joyous life. They will quit
kicking and will go to work in a cheer
ful frame of mind. They will also en
deavor to be honest in business. They
may find this task rather hard, as one
business man already has declared that
his clerks, most of whom are members of
one of the two societies, will be imme
diately fired if they try to keep their
pledges around bis establishment.
EARTHQUAKE FOR THE SOUTH
Prediction That Little Hock find "2ot
Springs Will Bo Hit.
Oklahoma. City, Okla. Geological re
searches indicate that portions of Okla
homa, Arkansas and Texas will one day
be visited by an earthquake more far-
reaching in its area and more destructive
in its effects than that from winch Italy
recently has suffered, according to Prof.
Charles N. Gould, a member of the fac
ulty of the Oklahoma State University
and director of the State geological sur
vey. He says that Tishomingo and
Atkoia, Okla., Dcnison, Waco and Tex
arkana, Tex., and Little Rock and Hot
Springs, Ark., will be in the center lino
of disturbances. Prof. Gould claims that
the tuuse of the recent disturbance was
the sliding of subterranean layers of rock
accelerated by the tidal wave. He pre
dicts that eventually a series cf disturb
ances will bring the quake eenttr beneath
the central part of tho United States and
toward the South, lie makes no predic
tion as to the date.
BAPTIZED UNDER ICE.
Cold
Water of Iitiko Used to Wash
Away Sins.
St. Joseph, Mich. In the presence of
1,000 persons giouped on the snow and
ice-clud shore of Lake Michigan, a class
of Church of God converts were Sunday
afternoon baptized by Itev. August F.
Scluuittz, head of the local church. De
scending into tho chilled water by means
of a ladder, through a hole in the ice,
ivn persons, ranging in age from a small
child to a frail woman 72 years old, were
thus immersed. A cold, raw wind
swept in from the lake. Clad in the
robes of his church, the Itev. Sehmittz
solemnly led the religious procession
across the ice to the open water a hun
dred feet from tho shore, where the cere
mony was to take place. After offering
up a prnyer lie entered the wnter, which
camo up to his chest. Floating ice in
terfered somewhat with the inpidity
with which the pastor apparently desired
to work, but each candidate suctvesfully
entered tho lake and ipiicklv afterward
scrambled out again. Thoy were clad in
ordinary clothing. Three of the women
wero barefooted.
$20,000 LID IN GEORGIA.
Milledgcville Council Goes
Limit
on
"Near Beer."
Atlanta, Ga. News of the method
adopted by Milledgoville, Ga., to remain
dry reached hero Sunday. The town
council has just imposed a liecn&o of
$20,000 upon tho sale of "near beer."
The town has been experimenting with a
$10,000 license on locker clubs, nnd its
unqualified success led to the "near bcei"
rcfiulntiou.
- m
CHIEF SAYS riOUSn
MISUNDERSTOOD lj
Message to tower Branch
on Secret Service.
BIG STICK FALLS ON
FOUR
'l
Champions of Provision to Limit Sc"d S
of Investigators Arc Raked OverY
.the Coals by Roosevelt Federal
Sleuths Defended by Executive.
"Washington. President Roosevelt's big
stick crashed down upon tho heads of
nepresentntlves Tnwney of Minnesota,
Smith or Iowa, Sherley of Kentucky, and
Fitzgerald of New York, when the execu
tive sent a special message to tho houso
of representatives, berating thoo solons
for being champions of the successful
move to place limitations upon tho scope
of the secret service.
Tho president also declared that tle
Interpretation of the house of tho secret
service clause In his last messaqo war
misunderstood, and had thoro been any
evidence which would point to thejiccos
slty of an Investigation of members,
such evidence would long ago have Uecn
turned over to the proper authorities.
Tho message was In answer to tho res
olution transmitted from tho housrt In
which tho representatives asked for evi
dence upon which Mr. Roosevelt basjed
his statements that tho "chief argument
In favor of the provision was that tV"0
congressmen did not themselves wish fto-
be Investigated by secret service men."
For the Ananias Club.
Tho message In part:
"I nm wholly at n loss to understand!
the concluding portion of the resolution.
I have made no charges of corruption
against congrots nor against nny member
of the present house. If I had proof of
such corruption affecting any member of
the house in nny matter ns to which tho
federal government has Jurisdiction, no
tion would at once be brought, nn was
done In the cases of Senators Mitchell
and Burton, nnd Representatives Wil
liamson, Herrman and Drlggs, nt differ
ent times since I have been president.
This would simply be doing my duty In
tho execution and enforcement of the
laws without respect to persons. But I
do not regard It as within the province
or the duties of the president to report
to the house "alleged delinquencies' of
members, or the supposed 'corrupt ac
Hon' of a member 'In his official capa'ft
Ity.' Tho membership of the houso X
by the constitution placed within thJ
power of the houso alone. In tho prosel,
cutlon of criminals nnd tho enforcements
of the laws the president must resort to
the courts of the I'nlted States.
"In the third and fourth clauses of the
preamble It Is stated that the meaning of
my words Is that 'the majority of the
congressmen are In fear of being Inves
tigated by Eccret service men' nnd that
'congress as a whole wns actuated by
that motive In enacting tho provision In
question,' nnd thnt this Is nn Impeach- i
ment of the honor and Integrity of the
congress. These statements are not, I
think, In accordance with the facts."
Misunderstood, He Says.
"This allegation In the resolution, there
fore, must certainly be due to an entire
failure to understand my message.
"The resolution continues: 'That the
presldent be requested to transmit to tap
house any evidence upon which ho basefj
his statements that the "chief argument'
In favor of the provision was that the- $
congressmen did not themselves wish to- I
be Investigated by secret service men."
This statement, which was an attack
upon no one, still less upon tho congress,
Is sustained by the facts.
"If you will turn to tho Congressional'
Record for May 1 last, pages E553 to E5C0,
Inclusive, you will find the debate on this
subject. Mr. Tawney of Minnesota, Mr,
Smith of Jo-wa, Mr. Sherley of Kentucky,
und Mr. Fitzgerald of New York appear
In this debate as the special champions
of the provision referred to. Messrs. Par
sons, Rennet nnd Drlscoll wero the lead
ers of those who opposed the adoption
of tho amendment and upheld the right of
the government to use the most efficient
means possible In order to detect crim
inals and to prevent and punish crime.
The amendment wns carried In tho com
mittee of tho whole, where no votes of
the Individual members nro recorded, so
I am unable to discriminate by mention
ing the members who voted for and the
members who voted ngnlnst the provision,
but Its passage, the Journal records, was;
greeted with applause. I am well aware, t
however, that in nny case of this kind
many members who have no particular
knowledge of tho point at lssuo nre con-
tent r.lmply to follow tho lead of tho
committee which had considered the mat-
ter, and I have no doubt that many mem-
bers of the houso simply followed tho
lead of Messrs. Tawney and Smith."
Asks Reversal of Action.
Concluding, the president said:
"In conclusion, I most nrnestly nslt, In
tho name of good government und decent
administration, In tho name of honesty
and for tho purpose of bringing to Justice
violators of the federal laws wherever
they may bo found, whether In public or
private life, that the action taken by tho
house last year bo reversed. When this
action wns taken, tlfo senate committee,
under tho lead of tho luto Senator Alli
son, having before It a strongly-worded
protest from Secretary Cortelyou like
that he had sent to Mr. Tawney, accepted
tho secretary's Uows; nnd tho senate i
passed the bill in the shape proscntcd by
Senutor Allison. In tho conference, how-
ever, tho houso conferees insisted on tho
retention of tho provision they had In- I.
sertcd, nnd tho sennto yielded. '.
"Tho chief of the secret servlco Is paid N
n salary utterly Inadequate to tho Impor
tance of his functions und to tho admir
able way In which ho has performed
them. I earnestly urge that It may be
Increased to G,C00 per annum. I also urge
that the secret service be placed where
It properly belongs, and made a liurenn
In the department of Justice, us the chief
ei
tie ,
01 win secre.i i.ervice lias repeatedly re-
iluuBii'u; uui wneiiier mis is uono or not,
it should bo explicitly nravlded Hint tho
secret service can be used to detect and 1
punish crime wherever It Is found.
THEODORE ROOSEVELT."
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