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The Farmington times. (Farmington, St. Francois County, Mo.) 1905-1926, July 05, 1918, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066996/1918-07-05/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE FARMINGTON TIMES. FARMINGTON. MISSOURI.
PAGESEVXZI
Farmington Tire Works
Rebuilds tire and make them good as' new, positively guaranteeing
them to atand as much service as new tires, though it has been re
peatedly demonstrated that the rebuilt tire will stand even more ser
vice than the average new tire. Our method of rebuilding tires is by
a patented process, in which is used two old tires, securely vulcan
ized. We are also thoroughly equipped for retreading of tires, and do
all kinds of tire repair work. .
DRUCE & CHALK, Proprietors, - Farmington, Mo.
SALEM SCHOOL DISTRICT
CLEARS $125.25
The Salom school district on last
Friday held a picnic and auction sale
for the benefit of the Red Cross. The
rain interrupted the sale on Friday af
ternoon but the sale was resumed on
Saturday afternoon and every thing
sold. The receipts of the sale and pic
nic was $125.25, -which was raised
largely through the donations) of the
good women of that comunity. Thrift
Stamps and War Saving Stamps were
sold also on the grounds.
Announcements
The Times is authorized to make
the following announcements, for the
offices indicated, subject to the action
of the regular Democratic Primary
election:
For Congress:
ARTHUR T. BREWSTER
of Ironton.
DAVID N. HOLLIDAY
of Greenville
W. A. LOEFFLER
' of Lutesville.
CHAS. P. DAMRON
of Fredericktown.
For State Senator:
J. H. TETLEY
of Farmington.
W. B. RARIDEN
of Farmington.
For Representative:
JEFF D. POSTON
of Bonne Terre.
JOHN C. SEGER
of Bonne Terre.
For County Collector
OLIN DALE NORWINE.
of Flat River.
GEORGE WILSON CLOUD,
of Flat River.
AMOS C. NORWINE.
. of Bonne Terre.
J. ED BREWER,
of Doe Run.
ALBERT LEE MILLER,
of Bonne Terre.
ESPY E. JACKSON
of Leadwood.
C. I. GARRETT
of Randolph Township.
T. L. HANEY
of Flat River.
W. N. FLEMING
of Farmington.
CiUY TULLOCK
of Farmington.
L. GEORGE WILLIAMS
of Bonne Terre.
For County Clerk:
BERT STAPP
of Leadwood.
A. P. (PAUL) MITCHELL
of Flat River.
J. A. (GUS) LAWRENCE
of Farmington.
MARVIN W. CROWDER
of Farmington.
C. P. WILKSON
of Bonne Terre.
For Probate Judge:
R. C. TUCKER
of Farmington.
For Circuit Clerk:
J. C. HEIFNER
of Flat River.
A. W. KINZER
of Flat River.
For Recorder of Deeds:
HENRY M. O'BANNON
of Farmington.
For County Assessor:
JAMES G. MORRIS
of Desloge.
M. A. PATTERSON
of Bonne Terre Route 1.
F. M. HORTON
of Flat River.
For Prosecuting Attorney:
R. L. ALLEN
' of Tarmington.
For Presiding Judge of County Court:
- W. A. MITCHELL
of Esther.
NATHAN A. ZIMMERMAN
of St. Francois.
For County Court Judge, 1st District:
E. C. PAPIN
of French Village.
J. W. JONES
of Flat River. -
For County Court Judge 2nd District:
,r F. M. MATKIN :..
, ... of Doe Run, ;..
For Constable St. Francois Township:
, EDWARD GRIFF ARD ,
. - of Flat River.
republican0"annquncements
For Presiding Judge of County Court :
HENRY H. RINKE
MUST KEEP PACE
WITH THE TLMES
One of the biggest services that a
country newspaper can perform for
its community is to help make the
community a better place to live in. .
The demand for the services of com
petent people is so great that they can
choose their location. The town that
does not keep up-to-date will lose its
progressive young men and women
and suffer the fate of eastern villages
whose young men and women went
west and whose old men and women
are past the productive stage.
Our farms demand the attention of
progressive intelligent people if they
are to respond to the enormous world
demand for the production of food.
That kind of people can get big
money in factories and offices of every
description in the cities where all mod
ern conveniences are available. If the
modern conveniences do not come to
the people on the farm, the people on
the farms will go to the modern con
veniences. Water, heat and light must be a?
conveniently availablo to people who
produce food on farms as to people
who work in offices or stores or shops.
Otherwise the farmer's boy3 and gills
will leave the farm and the price of
food will increase. .
FERTILIZE THIN
WHEAT LAND
Farmers who plan to sow wheat on
thin land this fall should not fail to use
fertilizer with it, if the fertilizer can
he secured. Results from the exper
iment fields of the University of Mis
souri College of Agriculture show that
an increase of 5 bushels of wheat is
a conservative estimate of what may
be expected from the application of
150 pounds of highly phosphoric fertil
isers. Acid phosphate, bono meal, or
mixed fertilizers which contain 1 to 2
per cent nitrogen and from 10 to 12
per cent of available phosphates are
the best fertilizers to use. The value
of a 5-acre increase this season will
certainly be not under $10 and the cost
of 150 pounds of these fertilizers will
range, from $2.15 to $3.25 at present
prices.
As stated, a 5-bushel increase is a
conservative estimate. There are
many places, however, where- the yield
will be increased considerably more
than this, altho it is probably best to
limit the expectation to 5 bushels.
Further, the return on clover and gr
ass following the wheat is usually
very marked. N
PREVENTION CONTROLS
POULTRY MITES
Preventive measures are the best
methods of control for poultry mites.
Since it is known that darkness,
dampness, and filth are favorable for
the development of the pest, it is
clear that sunshine, dryness, and
cleanliness are the best means of pre
venting the mites from getting a
start. The hen house cannot be kept
too clean, and it should be so con
structed that it may be easily cleaned.
Provide good ventilation and allow a
maximum amount of sunshine within.
For eliminating the mites from the
hen house, T. J. Talbert, of the Uni
versity of Missouri College of -Agriculture,
recommends thorough spray
ing with kerosene emulsion, strong
lime-sulphur, miscible oils, strong to
bacco solution, or commercial stock
dips. The spray should be repeated
within a week or ten days to kill the
young which may have developed
from the eggs that were not destroyed
by the first spray. Sprays should be
applied as often as necessary to keep
the pests under control.
SURPLUS OF VELVET
BEANS IN THE SOUTH
Because of the surplus of velvet
beans in the South efforts are being
made by the Bureau of Markets to
acquaint dairymen and feeders of live
stock in the North and East of the
value of velvet-bean meal in feeding
live stock. Experiments have been
conducted at southern experiment sta
tions indicating that this meal is an
excellent feed for cattle, horses and
hogs, and it is pointed out that be
cause of the high prices of mill feeds
velvet-bean meal should be used more
generally by dairymen in the North
and East.
Now the least pathetic feature of
the present situation is that trie deep
sea excursion fishing boats will take
a vacation.
An exhibition of German art and
kultur is to be opened in Constanti
nople. This is enough to cause the
"unspeakable" Turk to And his voice.
DR. R. E. WALSH
DENTIST
Farmington, Realty Bldg. Phone
111. Tuesday, Thursday and
. Saturday. .
Flat River Phone 572. ( '
Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
Better Dental Work; Painless '
Extractions. -
::COUNTY . CORRESPONDENCE
VALLE'S MINES-
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Rowe were St.
Louis visitors a few days during the
week.
Misses Cora and Gustine Buscher
visited friendB in -Bonno Terre Wed
nesday.
Mr. and Mrs. H. t.. Knodcs visited
at tho home of Wm. E. Heaton Fri
day and Saturday.
Mrs. John Manwnrring ana son ot
Bonne Terre visited her mother hero
one evening during the week.
Ed Heaton was a Bonne Terre vis
itor Saturday.
Several from here attended the mc-
nic at Hardin Grove Saturday night.
John rremo oi Bonne Terre was a
Valle's Mines visitor Thursday eve
ning.
Miss Bessie Kiddle and brother, Al
bert, visited at tho home of Alfred
Rowo Saturday and Sunday.
Mrs. Erne Turley and cniidren
were guests at the home of Will Tur
ley and family Saturday and Sunday.
Miss Etliylme Watt visited her
home folks Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. r . M. Kichardson and
son, Chesley, visited at the home of
Ed Richardson .Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank HarversUck
and children visited Henry Turley
and family Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Thoa. Turley and
daughter, Mabel, and Mrs. Lizzie Tur
ley visited at the home of Dave Moon
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. wm. jt. Heaton. visit
ed at the home of Jas. Bunt Sunday.
Miss Eda and Alvm Kouggly of
French Village visited their brothers
here Saturday and Sunday.
Edw. Heaton. Lon and Ueo. Moore,
Bryan Thurman, Hurvey and John
Rowe and John Parker attended the
dance at Melzo Saturday night.
Misses Olga and Elsie Heaton vis
ited at tho home of Jas Appleberry
Sunday.
There will be church services here
Saturday and Sunday night. Every
body invited to attend.
Joe waller, uco. tsaroey ana raui
Pcrret of Hazel Run were Valle's
Mines visitors Sunday.
John Kowe and Edw. Heaton were
FcRtus virirnrs Sunday evening.
Charley bhannon of Hat Kiver vis
ited 4iis parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. W.
Shannon, Saturday and Suiday.
Miss Eunice Elliott of Plattin vis
ited at tho home of Dale Hawk Sun
day.
Chester Woolem ot bt. Louis Visit
ed his father, Al Woolem, a few days
during the week.
Burr McCarty of Dcboto was a
Valle's Mines visitor Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Whitcsell visit
ed their son at Ware, Mo., Sui.day.
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Kichardson and
children visited relatives and frier. Is
at Hazel Run Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. f . Kowe and chil
dren visited at tho home of H. C.
Rhodes Sunday evening.
Albert Kiddle and Marion Thurman
were DeSoto visitors Sunday evening.
PRIMROSE
Mrs. Ida Jones and children were
shopping in Bonne Terre one day the
fore part of the week.
J. U. King was a visitor at trie
home of Wm. A. Moon Sunday evening.
Mrs. Alice Moon and Miss rrar.ces
Whitter were guests at the home of
Morris Jones one evening last week.
Ravmond Cole of near Prospect
transacted business in Bonne Terre
Friday.
Mr. and Mrs. Lass Lash spent
Thursday night at the homo of Win.
Moon.
Wm. Snyder transacted business in
Bonne Terre Saturday evening.
Miss IViellie Moon was a guest at
the home of Morris Jone.one evening
last week.
Mrs. Hattie Crossman spent one
evening last week at the home of
Wm. Moon.
Farmers in this neighborhood are
busy cutting meadows, wheat and
oats.
Grover Jones transacted business in
Bonne Toito Saturday.
Those who were entertained at the
home of Lass Cash Sunday were Mr.
and Mrs. Marion Wiltong and chil
dren, Mr. and Mrs. Rube Cash and
children and Josh Cash.
These who were entertained at the
home of Wm. Moon last Sunday were:
Misses Etta Lawson, Myrtle Pett!.?
Elsie and Edna Rawson: Herman Law-
son, Leathcl and Fenton Rawson and
Jake Moses.
Rev. E. J. Eaves of near DeSotc
was unable to fill his appointment tit
the-T. M. B. Church Saturday and
Sunday but sent Rev. C. C. Haley of
DeSoto District Missionary of the
Jefferson County Baptist Association,
to fill the pulpit in his absence.
Crops in this part of the country
are looking fine.
BRIGHTSTONE
Grover O'Bannon spent a few days
last week with friends at Marquand.
Miss Bertha Wells is spending the
week with her Bister, Mary, at t arm
ington.
Misses Emma and Birdie Kinneman
and cousin, Charles Kinneman, were
visiting Miss Bertha Wello Sunday af
ternoon. '
Tony Baker spent Sunday afternoon
at John Wells
Geo. Skinner was a Farmington
visitor Monday.
Tom Wells was a business visitor at
Chas. Weimer's Monday.
August Klob started threshing
wheat on Route 6 Tuesday. The price
set for threshing wheat this year is
7 cents per bushel.
Arthur Hightower was visiting rel
atives near Farmington Sunday. 1
Henry Kinneman was a Farmington
visitor Monday.
CROSS . ROADS
Several from this community atten
ded tho ice cream social at the M. E.
church at , Womack last Saturday
mgnt. - -
William Lens was a Mine La Motte
visitor last Saturday.
daughter of Fredericktown spent a,
few hours last 'Wednesday evening
here with relatives.
Nellie Tesreau and father spent last
Saturday and Sunday with relatives
near Spring Valley.
Mr. and Mrs. Circlum of Mine La
Motte spent Saturday with Mr. and
Mrs. A. C. Wilkerson.
Bertha Kenner attended the chil-
drens day exercises at Spring Valley
last Sunday.
Remember that there will be church
at the school house next Sunday.
Mrs. Wilson and family are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Rhodcman
at this writing.
Mr. and Mrs. A.' C. Wilkerson were
Fredericktown visitors last Saturday.
The proceeds from the ice cream so
cial which was given at the M. E.
church at Womack Saturday night
amounted to $45.00.
COFFMAN
(Too late for last week)
Mrs. Frank Gcgg who for the
Dast few months has been in a hos
pital in St. Louis where she underwent
a surgical operation returned to her
Sunday afternoon. Her mnny friends
here were glad to hear of her im
provement and hope that she will soon
be enjoying good health.
Miss Rcva Boyd was the guest of
Miss Ophia Graham Sunday afternoon.
J. C. and Burl Harter of Route 3
were visitors in our village Sunday
afternoon.
R. A. Adams and family and Hilda
Bauer were shopping in Farmington
Tuesday.
Joe Gegg, Carol Boyd, C. A. Boyd
of Avon motored to Ste. Genevieve
Sunday.
Frank Graves motored to Ste. Gen
evieve and was accompanied home by
his father and mother-in-law.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Graves and ch
ildren sDcnt Sundav afternoon with
Mrs. Graves' parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Gegg.
Eddie Stafin of Barks lett Monday
for the training camp.
Floy Bin of near Avon and Miss
Irene Ellis of Womack were married
Friday in Farmington. This neigh
borhood wish for them success and a
happy life.
A crowd of people gathered at the
home of Mr. Rottlcr of near River Aux
Vases Sunday to bid farewell to Harry
Rottlcr who left for camp Monday.
A large crowd from this commun
ity atended church services at River
Aux Vases Sunday morning.
Mis Elsie Govreau who had emplo
yment at Farmington returned herp
Saturday night to spend several week;!
or longer with her sister, Mrs. Geo
Fannestock.
Andy Boyd and family spent sev
eral days with his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Tom Boyd.
Willard Koper of Eads, Mo., was tne
guest of his sister over Sunday night.
Mr. and Mrs. John Biri and little
daughter, Elene, were the guests of
Ben graham and family Sunday.
A crowd of voungsters spent Sun
day afternoon with the Misses Herman
of near Avon.
Mrs. R. A. Adams was the guest of
Mrs. Ben Graham Sunday.
Ben Graham and family and John
Biri arid family motored to Ste. Gen
evieve Sunday.
R. A. Adams sold two nne pigs to
Mr. Kriether of River Aux Vases Sat
urday. The pigs brought a good p. ico.
Henry Martin lelt Monday ior inn
trailing camp.
SUGAR GROVE
Relatives here of Jesse Haynes
have received the information that
he has arrived in Frnnce. He left f re
training camp Feb. 2ti, and is in the
Engineers Corps.
Mrs. Fannie Anrtlegale of Farming-
ton spent Saturday night and Sunday
with relatives in this vicinity.
Rev. R. C. Martin spent Sunday
with his son. Bill Martin, of Route t
Harry Noltkempcr and family and
Tom O'Bannon and wife were guests
of Peter Zolman and wife Saturday
evening. -
Misses Blanch Pinkston and Bianen
Havnes wero guests of home folks
here Monday. ' ,
Mrs. Ed Horst and M1S3 lessie
Murphy of St. Louis are guests of
Mrs. Tom O'Bannon this week.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Williams ana
daughter. Miss Fannie, visited Ms.
Williams' brother. P. B. Col,e of Cal
edonia, last Sunday. v
Mr. and Mrs. Marion Haynes of
Farmington visited his pare.its, Mi.
and Mrs. Howard Haynes, last Sun
day. - ...
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde London arm Da
by of Farmington spent the Fourth
of July "with relatives in this neigh
borhood. Howard Haynes received a letter
from his son, Stanley, who is in
France. Stanley is in good health,
and said he enjoyed the trip fine.
WAR KITCHEN TO HANDLE
TON OF PRODUCTS DAILY
A new "Win the War Kitchen" j':st
opened in Richmond, Va., has been ei
tablished to save surpluses of fruits
and vegetables coming to the Rich
mond markets. The kitchen is in
charge of the uaban home demonstra
tion agent of the Department of Ag
riculture and the State , Agricultural
College, and three assistants. It is
situated next to one ot tne large mar
kets, anfl has equipment for handling
a ton of products daily. In addition
to a spacious glassed-in demonstra
tion room there is one room contain
ing a drying plant and a steam press
ure canner, another for canned sur
plus, one for the storage vegetables,
a rest room and the offices of the ur
ban home demonstration agent and
State leader of city work. The work
of the kitchen is being put on a thor
ough business basis. A committee
representing the three markets will
buy up the surplus at a reasonable
wholesale rate Wore it goes into the
markets,-thereby preventing .gluts and
assuring fresh products for canning
and drying. The home demonstration
agents are working in close co-opera-
m VnnA AHiniTiint.mt.Km."
T. For Table and
i raining laoie
' Experts may differ on questions
of conditioning, but the drink all
physical -fitness enthusiasts have
accepted is ;
Witness its popularity in canton
ments and on men-o'-war.
An appetizing beverage with true
hops flavor. Milk or water, may
or may not contain bacteria
Bevo cannot.
The all-year-'round soft drink to
train on and gain on.
Manufactured and bottled
eicluaively by
Anheuser-Busch
St. Louis
Bevo Served at all
Drug Stores, Soft Drink Stands,
Hotels and Cafes
t m9 vnm.f,m -m
THE PRESS
(By- Rudyard Kipling, in "A Diversity of Creatures.")
The soldier may forget his sword,
The sailorman the sea,
The Mason may forget the Word
And the Priest his litany;
The maid may forget her jewel and gem,
And the bride her' wedding-dress : ", """
But the Jew shall forget Jerusalem
Ere we forget the Press!
Who once hath stood through the loaded houi
Ere, roaring like the gale,
The Harrild and the Hoe devour '
Their league-long paper bale,
And has lit his pipe in the morning-calm
That follows the midnight st;ss
He hath sold his heart to the old iilack Art
We call the daily Press.
Who once hath dwelt in the widest game
That all of a man can play,
No later love, no larger fame
Will lure him long away.
A3 the war-horse smelleth the battle afar,
The entered Soul, no less,
He saith:'"Ha! Ha!" where the trumpets are '
And the thunders of the Press.
Canst thou number the days that we fulfill,
Or the Times that we bring forth?
Canst thou send the lightnings to do thy will,
And cause them to reign on earth?
Hust thou given a peacock goodly wings
To please his foolishness?
Sit down at the heart of men and things,
Companion of the Press!
The Pope may launch his Interdict,
The Union its decree,
But the bubble is blown and the bubble is pricked
By Us and such as We.
Remember the battle and stand aside
While Thrones and Powers confess
That King over all the children of pride .
Is the Press the Press the i'resa! t-
CROWDER TELLS WHY
IT'S 'WORK OR FIGHT
Washington, July 2. "Every man
who helps to set free a fighting man
is helping to fight and win tne w;r, '
declared Provost Marshal General
Crowder to day, commenting on hi3
"work or fight" regulation.
"The army and the navy are tak
ing the men who are best able physi
cally to do the fighting," he added.
"But that is-only one part cf the na
tional task imposed by the war. The
other part that falls on the otner man,
in to set free thoEe men who are to
do the fighting. It is every mnn's du
ty to give that share of help, 'ibat
duty to work, and to work effectively,
is the foundation of the new measure.
'Work cr fight,' there is no r.ltorna-tive."
"Whom the gods would destroy they
first make mad," and anger i3 a sort
of madness. No man in a rage, in
a panic or filled with hate can be trust
ed. Don't hate, swat! ,
To Farmers
Insure your grain
against loss by fire '
RATES: ,
1 month, 20 cents per $10000
2 months, 30 cents' per $100 00 ,
3 months, 40 cents per $100.00
4 months, 50 cents per $100.00
5 months, 60 cents per $100.Q0
6 months, 70 cents per $100.00
7 months, 75 cents per $100.00 .
8 months, 80 cents per $100.00
12 months, $1.00 per $100.00
Phones 137 and 178
O. W. BLEECK, Agent
. ; Farroington, Missouri
: h .

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