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The Farmington times. (Farmington, St. Francois County, Mo.) 1905-1926, August 01, 1919, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066996/1919-08-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
THE FARMINGTON TIMES, FARMINGTON, MISSOURI. AUGUST 1, Ult
7SO
Democracy
in Industry
IN accordance with its fixed policy of
dealing fairly with all, the Standard
Oil Company (Indiana), has inaugurated
an Industrial Relations Plan, which is de
signed to promote a spirit of co-operation
and mutual understanding between those
responsible to the 4623 stockholders for
the management of the Company and
the nearly 10,000 men and women who
make up the personnel of the Manufac
turing Department.
This Plan provides that representatives,
elected by the employees of the Manu
facturing Department, together with
representatives appointed by the man
agement, meet in joint conference to
consider, discuss, and pass upon all ques
tions, involving the efficiency, welfare,
and happiness of the working organ
ization. This Plan provides an effective means of
communication and contact between the
management and their employees.
It affords these employees a voice in all
matters pertaining to their employment
and to theirworking and living conditions.
It is designed to promote co-operation
and confidence between the manage
ment and their employees by recognizing
their common interest in all matters per
taining to works organization, industrial
efficiency and social wellbeing.
The adoption of this Plan by the Com
pany and its employees is but another
step toward perfecting the service which
the Company is striving to render the
public.
Standard Oil Company
(Indiana)
910 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago
SOUTHEAST MISSOURI NEWS
Licenses Raised for More Revenue
Appreciative of the fact that more
revenue for the current expenses of
the city government must be obtained
since the abolition of saloons has cue
down one principal source of funds,
a special adjourned meeting of the
City Council was held last Monday
night, adjourned over from the regu
lar meeting for this purpose, at which
time an ordinance No. 37H revising
the license system of the city and in
creasing license fees for most of the
ordinary businesses from fifty to one
hundred per cent, and even more, was
passed. Caruthersville Democrat.
Fourteen Hogs Stolen
One night last week 14 head of
hogs were taken from the pen at the
Oddy Layton Feed Store here near
the public square. The hogs would
average in weight about 185 pounds
each, or about $43 per head, or in other
words about $G00. The fact that there
was no break in the fence, and the
gate tightly closed, shows plainly that
the porkers were led out and driven
away. Up to the time these lines are
-written, no trace of them has been
found. Perry Co ntnSyuu bli)660ti(i.D
found. Perry County Sun.
Mississippi County to Have Agent
Mississippi county will have an ag
ricultural agent, beginning August 5.
For some time the county has been
without an agent and now one has
been secured, O. H. DeWolf, of Kan
sas City.
DeWolf is a graduate of the Col
lege of Agriculture of the University
of Missouri, class of 1917. Since his
graduation he has been with the J.
P. Peppard Seed Co., of Kansas City.
Sikeston Herald.
' Some Record
Countv Farm Agent Jas. M. Ellison
informs us of an instance of extra
ordinarily rapid growth and culture
of corn in this county, as related to
him by Albert Kelley, a farmer in the
Pulltight neighborhood. Mr. Kelley
states that he planted forty-five acr?s
in corn, which came up, was plowed
three times and laid by within a per
iod of three weeks from the date ot
its planting, being almost breast-hign
and of a rich black color at the time
of completion, clean of weeds and very
thrifty. If there is a place anywhere
that can beat this record, we have
yet to learn of it. Caruthersville
Democrat.
Visiting By Airplane
Mrs. Emory Mathews of Sikeston
established a precedent in this city
for traveling in a most modern fash
ion Tuesday, when she came over
from Sikeston in an airplane for a
short visit with her mother, Mrs. Geo.
VanLear. Mrs. Matthews is the first
to use an airplane for a "taxicab" in
to Charleston, and one of the hrst in
Southeast Missouri, a Vanduser bank
er acquiring this honor last week by
hiring the Sikeston plane, to take him
back home after a business trip to tho
city. Lieut. Fawlkner, the aviator
who brought Mrs. Matthews over, is
the same airman who made the
flights around Charleston last week,
giving over fifty persons here their
first experience in the latest mode of
locomotion. Charleston Enterprise-
Courier.
Missouri Cobalt Co. to Re-open
Notices were posted at the plant of
the Missouri Cobalt Company this
morning announcing an increase in
wages of the employees, effective tho
first of August. The amount of the
increase is not stated on the notices
and at the present time is a matter of
conjecture. Probably the market
price of the products of the mine at
the time of the raise will determine
the rate. An official stated that the
mine and mill work would be resumed
not later than the middle of August
at the old capacity. They were closed
something over a month ago because
of the extremely low price of copper.
The ro-opening of these two depart
ments will furnish employment for
an additional ninety to a hundred
men. Fredericktown Democrat-News.
Boy Drowns
Lee Smith, the 14-year-old son of
Mr. and Mrs. George Smith of Mine
La Motte, was drowned Sunday eve
ning in the lake back of the mill at
that place.
Lee, with another boy, Fred Dublois,
had gone to the lake and Lee was the
first into tho water. He waded out a
few feet and stepped into deeper wa
ter and became frightened. The Du
blois boy went to his assistance but
became frightened and ran home, a
distance of a half mile or more where
he reported the accident.
Several rushed to the lake as soon
as the affair was reported but no
sign was found of tho missing boy.
The Dublois boy showed where he
disappeared and Avery Green and
Will Johnson went into the water and
found the body almost in the exact
spot where he went down, lie was in
about six feet of water and had been
there about three-quarters of an hour.
Fredericktown Democrat-News.
Plowing With Fordson Tractors
A new occupation has developed in
Southeast Missouri in the way cf
tractor service for the trade.
Two young men A. G. Murphy,
better known in baseball circles as
"Peg Leg" Murphy, and Gene Mitch
ell, both from Farmington are now
plowing on the A. J. Matthews farm
at Oran at contract rates.
Plowing began about two weeks ago.
Recently Harvey Haile, another Farm
ington boy, came down with another
tractor and began plowing for the
same men. Now two Fordson tractors
are plowing steadily all day on the
big farm.
Contract rates average $3.00 an acre
and the two men operating one tractor
plow about 15 acres each day, begin
ning about 3 a. m. and quitting near
midnight. One of the men gets up
early and plows till noon; then the
other takes the tractor and plows un
til late into the night. The tractors
each pull two 14-inch plows and the
expenses of the machine will approx
imate $5 a day for oil and gas for
each one.
When asked if paying $3 an acre
was better than plowing with teams,
Emory Mathews replied that It was,
especially when the ground was dry.
"They can mnko money," he said,
"and we can save by it.
"Whore are they going from your
place when they finish plowing?"
"Oh, we will put them to disking,"
he replied, for plowing on the Clover
dale Farm at Oran is a job of a thou
sand or so acres. Sikeston Herald.
Later Earl McAtee has taken the
place of A. G. Murphy.
An Old Fault Finder
An irritable and fault finding dispo
sition is often caused by indigestion.
A man with good digestion and bowels
that act regularly is usually good na
tured. When troubled with indiges
tion or constipation take Chamber
Iain's Tablets. They strengthen the
stomach and enable it to perform its
functions naturally. They also cause
a gentle movement of the bowels. Ob
tainable everywhere. (adv.)
No convenience adds more to the
comfort and well-being of the family
on the farm than a good system of
running water. After it has been in
use for some time the farmer and his
family usually wonder how they ever
got along without it. Carrying water
is hard, tiresome labor and usually
must be done at the busiest time.
when other work is most pressing.
Extension Circular 49, by F. C. Pen
ton, explains systems, from the sim
plest to the most elaborate, by which
running water may be had in the
farm home. This circular may be had
upon request from the University of
Missouri College of Agriculture, Columbia.
The Best Physic
When you want a pleasant physic
try Chamberlain's Tablets. They are
easy to take and mild and gentle in
effect. They are highly prized by peo
ple who have become acquainted with
their good qualities. They only cost
a quarter. Obtainable everywhere.
FARMERS, ATTENTION!
I have again secured the agency for the famous
Read Phosphate Co. fertilizers and while I am in
Colorado my business will he handled by W. E.
Matkin and C. B. Denman. The Read fertilizers
have given entire satisfaction. The prices for the
coming year are very attractive.
Thanking you for your past patronage and ask
ing that you give it to these men, I am,
Sincerely, ,
JOHN M. BURLBAW.
The other day
A fellow came into our office
And he said
I wish that I had done
Like Jim Brown did
He bought a lot, Jim did, and
He built himself a little home
The first year.
And he planned it so he could
Build more onto his home
The next year
And he did, and
Now he's got a fine big home
Worth a lot of money
And he owns it
And it's his.
And I
Came to town about
The same time .
Jim did
And I rented a house
Like a lot of other fellows
And the landlord sold the house
And I had to move
And I did
And I rented another house
And the landlord sold that'
And I had to move again
And all I got now is
Some rent receipts
And I've got to move again
Ain't that the limit?
OWN YOUR OWN HOME.
Tetley- Klein
Lumber Co.
TOMATO SPRAYING PAYS
Leaf blight diseases which attack
tomato plants cause a great deal of
loss each season by defoliating the
plants and causing their premature
death. A. L. Hailey of the East Dale
Canning Co., Seymour, Mo., sprayed
his forty-acre field of tomatoes la3t
year at the suggestion of tho Missouri
College of Agriculture. While spray
ing was started too late to be fully ef
fective, Mr. Hailey estimates that the
crop was increased at least one ton
per acre by spraying. Tomatoes were
worthe $15 a ton. the spraying cost
less than $5 per acre, even though la
bor was scarce and expensive. The
leaf blight is very prevalent this year,
and may do serious damage if not
checked. The material recommended
for spraying tomatoes is Bordeaux
mixture made up of four pounds of
copper sulphate, four pounds of lime,
and fifty gallons of water, the mater
ials being dissolved separately and
then poured together. If fruit worms
are troublesome one and one-half
pounds of arsenate of lead powder
may be added for each fifty gallons of
spray. A small compressed or knap
sack sprayer is most convenient for
spraying. Generally, the earlier
spraying is started, the more effective
it is in keeping the plants green and
healthy. Eggplant blight and fruit
rot are controlled by spraying in the
same way. Celery blight, melon
blight and mildew are also checked
very well by spraying with Bordeaux.
State of Ohio. City ot Toledo.
Lucaa County, s.
Frank J. Cheney makes oath that he
la senior partner ot the firm of F. J.
Cheney & Co., doing business In the City
of Toledo, County and State aforesaid,
and that said nrm will pay the sum of
ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS for each
and every case of Catarrh that cannot be
cured by the use of HALL'S CATARRH
MEDICINE. FRANK J. CHENEY.
Sworn to before me and subscribed In
my presence, this 6th day of December,
A. D. 1886. A. W. OLEASON,
(Seal) Notary Public.
Hall's Catarrh Medicine is tnken In
ternally and acts through tho Blood on
the Mucous Surfaces of the System. Send
for testimonials, free.
F. J. CHKNEY & CO., Toledo. O.
Sold by all ilruncists. 76c;
Ball's Family Pills for constipation.
Man born of woman is small pota
toes and few in a hill. In infancy he
is full of' colic and Godfrey's -cordial
and rheumatism, in youth his mother
taketh him across her knee and sweet
ens his life with a slipper, and when
he is a grown man the sheriff pursu-
cth him through the alleys all the days
of his life. He getteth into office and
his friends cling to him like flies to a
sugar barrel. He swelleth with van
ity. He cuteth ice a time, but is hewn
down at the salt box and his name is
Dennis; out of friends, he goeth bust
ed, and lieth down in the cowpasture.
He died out of the world and goeth
where it is warm enough without
clothes, and the last end of man is
worse than the first. Ex.
A Great Remedy
The merits of Chamberlain's Colic
and Diarrhoea Remedy are well known
and appreciated, but there is occasion
ally a man who had no acquaintance
with them and should read the follow
ing by F. H. Dear, a hotel man at Du
puyer, Mont.: "Four years ago I used
Chamberlain's Colic and Diarrhoea
Remedy with such wonderful results
that I have since recommended it to
my friends." Obtainable everywhere.
IRRITABLE
NERVOUS
Was Condition of Indiana Lady
Before Beginning to Take
Card-u-i, the Woman's
Tonic
Kokomo, Ind. Mrs. H. Hankemeier.
of this town, says: "I look so well, and
am so well, that it does not seem as if I
ever needed Cardui. But I was not al
ways this way ... I think I have taken a
dozen bottles . . . before my little girl
came.
I was feeling" dreadfully bad, had head.
ache, backache, sick at my stomach, no
energy ... I was very irritable, too, and
nervous.
I began taking Cardui about 6 months
before my baby came. As a result all
those bad feelings left me, and I Just felt
grand, just as if nothing at all was the
matter, and when the end came I was
hardly sick at all.
Since that I have never taken Cardui
stall . . . It has done me good, and I
know it will help others, If they will only
try it."
Many women have written grateful let
ters like the above, telling of the good
that Cardui has done them. Why should
it not help you, too? I! you suffer from
any of the ailments so common to women,
and feel the need ot a safe, reliable,
strengthening tonic, we urge you to be
gin today and give Cardui a fair trial.
Your dealer sells cara-u-4. . eb-io
Mr. Clancy
cf
The MARQUETTE
18th St. and "Wwhlngton Ave.
St. Louis
A Refinefl Hotel for Your
Mother, Wife and Sister
Single Room with Private Bath
S2.00 12.50 fO.CO
' Double 13.00 3.C0 RCO
Room without boih. sinflc. 1.50
Roomwithoutbath.doi:te.t3.C), f2.D0
4 Short Blocks from Uni Station
FOR STUBBORN
COUGHSAND COLDS
Dr. King's New Discovery
has a fifty year record
behind it
It built its reputation on its produc
tion of positive results, on its sureties
in relieving the throat irritation of
colds, coughs, grippe and bronchial
attacks.
"Dr. King's New Discovery? Why,
my folks wouldn't use anything else!''
That's the general nation-wide esteem
in which this well-known remedy is
held. Its action U prompt, its taate
pleasant, its relief gratifying.
Half a century of cold and cough
checking. Sold by druggists everywhere.
Bowel3 Out of Kilter?
That's nature calling for relief.'
Assist her in her daily duties with Dr.
King's New Life Pills. Not a purgative
in the usual dose, but a mild, effective,
corrective, laxative that teases the
bowels into action and chases "blues.'
JOHN B. ROBINSON,
Dentist. ,
Specializing in Plate and Bridge Work
Complete X-Ray Equipment
Office with Dr. B. J. Robinson,
Farmington, Mo.
Phone 94.
LEE RAW DEN
Dentist
Office: Realty Building, Room 6,
Farmington, Mo.
Phone 111.
Dr. E. J. WILLBANKS
Osteopathic Physician and Surgeon
Farmington, Mo.
Office: Farmers Bank Building.
Office hours: 8:30 to 11:30 a. m.;
1:30 to 4:00 p. m.
Phone No. 181.
a H. MARBURY
Attorney at Law
Practices in all the courts in the
State. Office Farmers Bank build
ing. Farmington, Missouri
F. S. WEBER
Physician and Surgeon.
Office in Room 10, Realty Building,
Farmington, Mo.
DR. R J. ROBINSON,
Physician.
Farmington, Met
Phone 94.
MR. HUGH PORTER,
Teacher of Violin.
22 years of Specializing.
Schubert School of Music
W. N. Fleming
NOTARY PUBLIC
REAL ESTATE
LOANS
INSURANCE
Your Business is Respectfully So
licited. Office in Realty Building.
FARMINGTON, MO. PHONE 71.
PARKVIEW CEMETERY
Farmington, Missouri
PERPETUAL CARE
Lots for Sale on Easy Terma
W. N. Fleming, Sec Phone 71
Lang & Bro.
Mf g & Mer. Co.,
FARMINGTON, MO.
Manufacturers of Wagons, Farm
Implements, Lumber and Build
ing Material.
GEO. C. FORSTER, Agent
FIRE, TORNADO, PLATE-GLASS and AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE.
'J Office in Farmers Bank Building.
Notary Public. Phone 355.
ADAM NEIDERT JOHN A. NEIDERT
NEIDERT UNDERTAKING CO.
UNDERTAKERS AND EflBALriERS
FARMINGTON, MO.
We are licensed emhalmers and carry in stock a complete line of
metal lined State and Couch Caskets, Robes and Grave Vaults.
Telephone calls, either day or night, are given our prompt attention
Office Phone 380 L Residence Phone 380 R
W. T. Haile, President.
R. L. ALLEN, Cashier.
W. J. Bess, Ass't Cashier.
E. a Swuik, Vice President
St. Francois County Bank
(Post Office Opposite.)
Farmington, Hissouri
Solicits your banking business. Insured against burg
lary. This is the bank with the Savings Depart
ment Interest paid on time deposits.
Directors:
THOS. H. STAM a a SWINK. W. T. HAILa ED. HELBEa
R. a ALLEN. S. J. TETLEY. E. J. HARRINGTON,
Established 1897.
W. M. HARLAN, President
W. a LANG, Vice President
M. P. CAYCE, Cashier
S. F. ISENMAN, Ass't Cashier
Bank oj Farmington
Capital Stock - $50,000
Capital and Surplus $75,000
Does a general banking and exchange business. Inter
est paid on time deposits. - Insured against
burglary. Collections a specialty.
Directors:
Peter Gleaning W. F. Doss M. P. Cayee W. R. Lang
W. M. Harlan a A. Rosier , J. a Klein
THE FARMERS BANK
FARMINGTON, MO.
Capital Stock - $50,000.00 .
- SurpluB ... - $35,000.00
ONE DOLLAR STARTS AN ACCOUNT.
Directors P. A. Shaw, Win. London, W. L. Hensley, W. C. Fischer,
a J-McKinney, C R Denman, L. H. Williams.
Farmington Undertaking Co.,
Office and Parlor in Tetley Building.
Office Phone 258
Night Phone 46
Rolla Cozean, Manager., ,

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