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The Farmington times. (Farmington, St. Francois County, Mo.) 1905-1926, July 15, 1921, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89066996/1921-07-15/ed-1/seq-6/

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JULY 15, 1921
PAGS SIX
THE FARMINGTON TIMES, FARMINGTON. MISSOURI.
AMERICAN LEGION GOING BACK TO FRANCE
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The American Legion is tending a pilgrimage back to France. The
delegation will sail from New York, Aug. 3. More than two hundred
representatives of the various posts will make the trip, guests of the
French nation, to be present at the unveiling of the Flirey Monument.
With the pew national commander, John G. Emery, present, Ambassador
Jusserand presented the first replica of the monument to President Hard
ing then extended an ollicial invitation to the American Legion to be
the guest of the French nation at the unveiling. ' In the picture, left to
right, arc: President Harding, Ambassador Jusserand, Ass't Scc'y of
Navy Theo. Roosevelt and Commander John G. Emery.
VALVE-IN-THE-HEAD GOVERNOR
Missouri now has the latest, new
est model 1921 valve-in-the-head dip
lomat (?) in the shape of Governor
Artie Hyde. The first session of his
legislature in Missouri wa3 a f.-ost
everything done wm vrong. Ha ca'.bi
an extra session anj ha3 begun to un
do the mistakes mado at tlie lirst ses
sion. This is diplomacy (?) No. 1.
After this session, we presume he will
again use the eame kind of diplomacy
and call another extra session, and so
on and so on. But what's the use of
calling the extra sessions? Why not
use more diplomacy (?) and keep the
legislators in continuous session. It
' would save the taxpayers all that
railroad fare (per diem mileage) of
the members who have to travel back
and forth across the etate to the dif
ferent sessions. They could pass one
bill today, try rt out for month and
If their constituents" or the people did
not like it they could change it, try it
another month, and so on down the
line. Just a little bit more diplomacy
by the governor and l:e will be a daisy
and that's what the cows lie on,
boys. Milan Standard.
TEACHING UNCLE
SAM ECONOMY
Oil I
Money bark without question
If HUNT'S GUAR ANT BHD
SKIN DISBASK KBMKDIUS
Rlneworro,Tetterroherltch-
tintmcDt it our rifck.
CITY DRUG STORK
Subscribe now$L50 a yearj
Choa'les- G Davej
These are the eyes cabinet mem
bers and department heads have to
look into in explaining government
expenses which "any average
business man would question in his
own business." It is a new picture
of Charles Dawes, director of the
budget President Harding has
promised will cut down our expenses.
IIFE
r-iIIJliin WTTTTOTTT THE
1 t. Fissure Fistula cured under a
tnw iint.il p.tird. v.
Free 304 -Page book for men ; 114-Page book for women.
'r EsUblished 35 years; located in St. Louis 32 years.
DR. H NEV SMITH, SPECIALIST, 500 Pine St, St Louis, Mo.
Dependable
Jewelry
More than fifty years of successful
business In Farmington is our guarantee
of handling nothing but thoroughly honest,
dependable goods, at prices that are al
ways worth the money.
When you want anything in our line
we will be pleased to have you call
Tetley Jewelry Co.
MISSOURI CROPS, JULY, 1921
Jefferson City, Mo., July 11. Mis
souri farmers are threshing 32,664,000
bushels of wheat from 2,744,000 acres,
with 45,905,000 bunhels of oats on 1,
K46.000 acres, and have 6,283,000 acres
of growimr corn, indicating 186,605,
000 bushels according to farmer-made
returns in the state-federal July crop
report announced today by E. A. Lo
gan and Jewell Mayes of the United
States and State Department of Ag
riculture, showing the combined yield
of wheat, corn and oats under present
conditions to be 265,224,000 bushels
against 251,393,000 in 1920.
The farmers of St. Francois county
report planting 14870 acres of corn
vith July condition of 85 per , cent,
which forecasts a total county pro
duction of 327,140 bushels. Wheat
harvested upon 12,330 acres, at 62 per
cent, will yield 86,310 buShels. The
oats for the county upon 4,350 acres,
with condition of 85 per cent, is fore
casted at 100,050 bushels.
Missouri farmers planted 6,283,000
acres of corn which is 178,000 less than
the five ye.'.r average. The July con
dition of corn is 90 per cent against
82 per c!nt last year (the 10-year av
erage) indicates 29.7 bushels per
acre, totaling 186,605,000 against the
July, 1920, prospect of 179,110,000
bushels. Corn improved rapidly dur
ing June and generally clean, a good
stand and dark green color. Occa
sional sections are weedy, due to lack
of cultivation, and in some communi
ties the plants are late and small.
Northwest Missouri has excellent
prospects except in portions of Holt
and Atchison where it has been too
ary. iNortneast Missouri was some
what too dry, also several counties in
the southeast, where the crop is ten
days to two weeks late. These sec
tions suffering from drouth were re
lieved somewhat the last days of June
and the first days of July. In middle
and west sections of the state corn
grew so fast that needed cultivation
has not been given in all fields. Chinch
bugs are appearing on corn in the
eastern counties from Clark to War
ren and nt scattered points on the
west side as far south as Stone. The
prospect is much better for a good
corn crop than at this time last year,
but the critical period will come from
the 10th to the 25th of the month.
Continuation of the present high tem
perature without plenty of moisture
would be disastrous to Missouri corn
Missouri wneat lost 14 points or
5,143,000 bushels during June. The
condition of 68 per cent, compared to
75 per cent last year and 10 year av
erage of 79 per cent, indicates 11.9
bushels per acre against 12 1-2 last
year, totaling 32,654,000 bushels com
pared to 32,721,000 in 1920. Over
flows during June carried off thou
sands of acres of wheat along the
Osage and other streams. Wheat in
stead of ripening naturally in June,
"apparently died within t day or two,"
evidently from rust anu blistering
sunshine. Heads are generally short
and poorly filled, but there Is plenty of
straw everywhere. Threshing returns
thus far, are disappointing in most
sections. Threshing has been delayed
by wet' weather, and considerable
wheat has been damaged in the shock.
Farmers report the causes affecting
the 1921 wheat yields as pasturing
too late, many spring freezes, repeated
excess of moisture and high tempera
ture, rust, hessian fly, chinch bugs,
green bugs and at ripening time too
hot, harvesting followed by damaging
rains.
Missouri oats are 72 per cent against
83 per cent a year ago, with 78 per
cent the 10-year average. The July
condition indicates 24.9 bushels per
acre, totaling 45,905,000 bushels
against 54,138,000 in 1920. Thus 1921
is the lowest acre yield since 1916 and
two bushels less than the 10-year av
erage. Storms the latter half of June
lodged much of the grain, preventing
harvesting at the proper time, and" re
sulting in loss in many places, live
stock having been turned in to save
the crop.
Hay condition 79 per cent compared
to 82 last year, 75 per cent the 10-year
average, indicating lt08 tons per acre
against 1.24 last year with 10-year av
erage 1.07, forecasting 3,013,000 tons
against 3,327,000 in 1920. The crop is
thin and weedy. Alfalfa 79 per cent,
clover 77 per cent, millet 84 per cent,
grain sorghum 89 per cent, cowpeas
89 per cent and soy beans are late.
Prairie hay is good. Pastures, 93 per
cent.
Gardens made a good growth during
June. Potatoes 82 per cent, sweet po
tatoes 91 per cent, tomatoes 90 per
cent, cabbage 89 per cent, onions 92,
watermelons 85 and cantaloupes 85
Fruits are very short, grapes 50 per
cent, blackberries 78 per cent, and
peanuts 87 per cent.
Crop conditions are favorable. Live
stock are healthy. Wool is averaging
15 cents per pound and slow sale,
fleeces average 6 1-2 pounds against
6.8 last year. . The season thus far has
been one of extremes, and not favora
ble to small grain. .
WHAT MISSOURI
FARMERS ARE DOING
Farmers of Johnson county are as
sembling another exhibit with which
to duplicate last year's performance
and take first prize in the county farm
bureau exhibit class at the Missouri
Contennial Exposition and State Fair,
Scdalia, August 8 to 20. Reports
from other sections of the state indi
cate, however1, that Johnson county
will have more competition this year
than they had last year.
Jackson county are planning tw3
big, all-day picnics to be held within
a short time. County Agent Howat is
urging the farmers of the county to
attend the gatherings, eat a lot of
fried chicken and other "truck" fixed
up By "mower ana to lorget lor a
day at least, the poor wheat crop and
worse oats crop. AU the "usual"
amusements and games will be provided.
Henry H. Carrithers, the riew county
agent in Dent county, where a county
farm bureau was recently organized,
reports that (two lime crushing outfits
are in full operation now and two
others are in prospect. The Dent
County Farm Bureau also is organiz
ing a livestock shipping association.
Receipts of wool at the St. Joseph
pool are nearly 400,000 pounds, ac
cording to John McDaniel, district
marketing manager. Grading has been
in progress for some time and the
graders report the average quality of
the wool this year as much better than
that pooled last year. It is expected
that the application for establishing
a bonded warehouse at St. Joseph will
be approved shortly as the building is
ideal, an inspector saidi
Fieldmen from the Collega of Ag
riculture found some, Fultz wheat in
Cooper county that grades 99.6 pure,
according to H. M. King, Jr., secre
tary of the new Cooper County Farm
Bureau.
The Cooper County Shorthorn As
sociation sponsored a picnic last week
at which about 75 shorthorn breeders
and their families attended. A tour
included visits to all the prominent
herds of shorthorns in the county. A
big sale is planned by the Associa
tion for September 23.
From Lincoln county comes a re
port of how practical co-operation re
sults' in increased profits for Farm
Bureau members. A poultry, associa
tion was organized in the county last
fall which now has 80 members.
Through persistent efforts, members
of the association have induced a pro
duce merchant at Troy to pay 3 1-2
cents a dozen or $1 a case more for
infertile eggs than he does for ordi
nary stock. An unsuccessful fight for
more money for infertile eggs was
waged for three, years prior to the or
ganization of the association.
Cas3 and Jasper aro two counties
that are making big preparations for
sending Farm Bureau exhibits to the
State Fair. Arrangements are being
made in Jasper county for chartering
Pullman for use of Farm Bureau
members exclusively.
The board of directors of the re
cently organized co-operative elevator
association at Harmonville was one
of the first in the state to vote to join
the U. S. Grain Growers, Inc. -
Catarrh Can Be Cured
Catarrh Is a local disease, greatly
Influence) by constitutional condi
tions. It therefore reqolres constitu
tional treatment. HALL'S CATARRH
MEDICINE Is taken Internally and
acts throngh the Blood on the Mucous
Surfaces of the System. HALL'S
CATARRH MEDICINE destroys the
foundation of the disease, gives the
patient strength bv Improving the gen
eral health and assists nature In doing
Its work. .
AH druggists. Circulars free.
F. J. Cheney & Co., Toledo, Ohio,
F. S. WEBER
Physician and Surf""
Office in Room 10, Realty- Buflcliaat
Farmington, Mo.
DR.' B. J. ROBINSON,
Physician.
CALL 390
S. P. COUNTS'
Repair Shop
on corner north of Farmington
Merc. Co. store.
Will repair your furniture, up-"
holster your parlor suit, your
automobile cushion. Will have
on hand a good line of upholst
ering goods to select from.
AJ1 work guaranteed.
Farmington, Ma
Phone 94.
. B. H. M ARBURT
Attorney at Law
Practices in all the courts in ths
State. Office Fanners Bank build
ing. Farmington, Missouri
JOHN R ROBINSON,
. Dentiat
Specializing in Plate and Bridge "Work
Complete X-Ray Equipment
Offico with Dr. B. J. Robinson,
Farmington, Mo.
Phone 94.
Mforangesr
WJf drink
' ll Mm. m m.m m w
7
-CRUSH
Qualify and deliciousness
have made Ward's Orange
Crush, Lemon -Crush and
Lime-Crush the largest sell
ing carbonated fruit drinks
in the world.
In 'batttmt or at lamualnt
' Bottled by
Coca Cola Bottling Co.,
Phone 98,
Farmington, Mo.
666 quickly relieves Constipation,
Biliousness, Loss of Appetite ' anc
Headaches, due to Torpid Liver.
DR. J. A. OVERTON
DR. SYLVIA R. OVERTON
Osteopathic Physicians
Farmers Bank Building
FARMINGTON, MO.
Office Phone, 296.
Residence Phone, 90.
W. N. Fleming
NOTARY PUBLIC
REAL ESTATE
LOANS
INSURANCE
Your Business is Respectfully So
licited. Office in Tetley Buildings
FARMINGTON, MO. PHONE 71.
LEE RARIDEN
Dentist
Office: Realty Building, Room 6,
Farmington, Mo.
Phone 111.
PARKYIEW CEMETERY
Farmington, Missouri
PERPETUAL CARE
Lots for Sale on Easy Terms
W. N. Fleming, Sec Phone 71
Lang & Bros
Mf g & Mer. Co.,
FARMING! ON. MO.
Manufacturers of Wagons, Farm
Implements, Lumber and Build
ing Material.
GEO. C. FORSTER, Agent
FIRE, TORNADO, PLATE-GLASS and AUTOMOBILE
INSURANCE.
Office in Farmers Bank Building.
Notary Public Phone S55.
ADAM NEIDEftT JOHN A. NEIDERT
NEIDERT UNDERTAKING CO.
UNDERTAKERS AND EHBALHERS
FARMINGTON MO.
We are licensed embalmers and carry in stock a complete line of
metal fined State and Couch Caskets, Robes and Grave Vaults.
Telephone calls, cither day or night, are given our prompt attention
Office Phone 380 L Residence Phone 380 R
E. E. Swink, President
R. L. ALLEN, Cashier.
L. A. Ramsey, Asa't Cashier.
Ed. Helber, Vice President.
St. Francois County Bank
(Post Office Opposite.)
Farmington, Hissourl
Solicits your banking business. Insured against burg
lary. This is the bank with the Savings Depart
ment Interest paid on time deposits.
Directors:
THOS. H.STAM E. E. SWINK. R. L. ALLEN. ED. HELBER.
DOCK MACKLEY. S. J. TETLEY. E. J. HARRINGTON,
Established 1897.
W. M. HARLAN, President
W. R. LANG, Vice President
M. P. CAYCE, Cashier
S. F. ISENMAN, Asst Cashier
Bank of Fantiington
Capital Stock - $ 50,000
Surplus and Profits $110,000
Does a general banking and exchange business. Inter
est paid on time deposits. Insured against
burglary. Collections specialty.
Directors:
Peter Gleasing - W. F. Doss M. P. Cayee W. S. Lang
W. M. Harlan E. A. Boiler J. E. Klein
THE FARMERS BANK
FARMINGTON, MO.
Capital Stock $504)00.00
Surplus - - - - 135,000.00
ONE DOLLAR STARTS AN ACCOUNT.
Directors P. A. Shaw, Wm. London, G. B. Snider, W. C Fischer,
E. J. McKinney, C B. Denman, L. H. Williams.
Farmington Undertaking Co.,
, Farmington, Moi
CALLS ANSWERED DAY OR NIGHT
Rolla Cozean, Manager.
Telephoned: Residence 46; Office 258

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