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The Palatka daily news. (Palatka, Fla.) 1884-1888, February 09, 1888, Image 1

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THE PA1LATKA. DAILY NEW;
tTAT TTATTT' TT
v uju u xya--u . -
it a i I roriM IcrWCnulVI! I F I
CIXI DIRECTORY,
APOTHECARIES.
ASbwe cor'nefTeon' and FrQafc ''
KEltSTINO, B
Northeast corner Lemon and Front. .
LOW KIT 8TAKK,
Front street, tourboon north Of pot office.
PEEK, f F .
Lemon street, laum block.
vr v- - -r- ' - .
WiUU "rin btore, liemoa ircv-i-
ATTORNEYS
BALimfN, JOSEPH K -
Prvffffic Building. PalatkB, Fla.
CAIJrfoUN DAVW.
rti.,t street, comer nrau.vuivt,
ANDLEK, StTMNk-K C - - ......
Front at, i aiuuwi
ll illkW'ockf Lemon street; office upstairs.
BANGOR ORANUt buacs.
ISot of laurel near JTtKW depot.
BANKS. -
HIRST NATIONAL BANK.
W J Winefc-ar, President, Front treet
BARBERS.
"mo'nweet, opposite Putnam House.
MOHR, FRANK
talk block. Lemon street.
BOARD OF TRADE.
FFTCF. NO 28 FKONT STREET.
OF vS tatbe city wihi,ltf Information
will be cheerfully supplied.
BOARDING HOUSES.
M&inaSinh1Koom,W.ter.ndMaU,
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
CreJt, next door to post office.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
VATTEKLIN, H T .
Morasne block. Lemon street.
BOOK BINDERS.
PAL ATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
Held street.
BOOt AND SHOE KAKINO AND REPAIRING.
Front it. 1 door south of First Nat Bank
K0onUU Putnam House.
CANOY MANUFACTURERS.
SMITH, R E J ',, v
No i Lemon street, GllUs block .
- CIGARS AND TOBACCOS.
Putnam Gallery, Lemon street, op Putnam
N08 Lemon 'street. Gillto block.
CISTERNS AND TANKS.
sn wr tr 1? 1 rrr Ttv
A L Jones, proprietor. Water street, near
J T 4 6. n aepoi.
! CIVIL ENGINEERING.
tit yuivevor, Nos. 8 and 1 Mora (me block.
over ivi"K .
CLOTHING AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS.
LOEB, MAHCU8
Gillls Wock. Lemon street.
ZACHAK1A8. A
No 1-J Lemon street.
CONFECTIONERY.
BECKP, I?
Lemoa street, corner of 8econd
CROCKERY.
Hickuian-Kennerly block, Imon street.
DENTAL ROOMS.
Mornirne block, Traon street, upstairs.
UOSEMilCKG. t)R W H
Hickmau block Lemon street, upstairs.
x DRY GOODS.
OEVERECX, CP
Lemon street
JACOHHON, 1
Phoenix block Imrai street
- GRAIN. HAY. ETC.
w n nmn-fT?L3 sV ff
' Foot of Laurel street, near JT4KWRY
GROCERS.
DUNN, JOHN T
Next to post office, Front street
HAG A N.J W
Lhfnoii afreet, corner of Jones
HALGHTON RO,A M
Phirnix block. Lemon street
tlC.NT,AV
yrt s block, foot of Lemon street
PETERMANN, HEMS
ronton stvect. southeast corner of First
. IOGKRO A MITNDF.E
Hickman-Kennerly block. Lemon street
BHV.LLEY. J H
Opposite Southern Express Company
GUN a LOCKSMITHS.
HEVDR1CKSON. L '
Lemon street, opposite Putnam House
usnnwiRF
GRIFFIN PARKER
Florida Southern building', W ater street
LANK. P. T x 4
Hart's block. Water street
HARNESS AND SADDLES.
BANDRIiSON.RC , , .
Opiiuxite Putnam House, lmon street
HOTELS.
. vlT 1 linrSR
A P Cnitovu, prop, cor Reid and Second sts
CARLETON HOUSE, Anlrew sueiiey. prop.
I'ourt House Wock, orange street
IUVTH. Pill KK' IV
John llixlor. iirort, cor Lemon and Water
ntut'iiMiA HOTEL Mai. A M Waahnurn.
i.riomr Fnmt arrMt corner of Williiim
THE WEST EM). FlnO-class Hoarding for
fiimilicu, cor of Dodge and Emmett streets
ICE.
T Tk-A ICS FACTORY. L C Canora,
muiuueer. Laurel st, let River and Einmett
INSURANCE.
riBlHTOK KF.VNKRI.Y
RtNimS. Kennorlv-Hickman blk.Lemonst
HILLIAKD A: CO..UHAS M
PHluika National Bunk building;, Front st
WEMK. W .1
Post i llice building
JEWELRY.
HEATH, O TS
I ,emon st root, opposite Putnam House
gPKt'K, JOHN F -
Front street, four doors south of Lemon
JOB PRINTING.
PAT. ATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY
Reid street
LIVERY STABLES.
CEM CITY LIVERY AND SALE STABLE
Near J T & K W depot, First street
MERW1N Jt rOX
liPmi'm street, between Third and Fourth
RAMSAUEK.JM lo
Corner of Reid and Secon street
LIME.
JRATON, Cn AS V. AoatiT
Foot of Laurel street
LUMBER.
BOYD, I A
KJver gti-ect, next to Gaa Works
MEAT MARKETS.
CROSS, W B
Munaire r Gem City market. Water street
CrMMINGSS CO . ,
Lemon street, two doors west of Jones
GOOOSON CO., M C
No 20 Front street
uimnir. THittlAS
Lemou street, between Third and Fourth
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS.
HOLBJJrtftK. MRS THOS
J-Yunt 8tret?t. oppoaite Putnam House
PAINTS. OILS AND ARTISTS' MATERIALS
piuat ka National Bank buildinr Front s
PHOTOGRAPHERS.
u i virn.n .T fl
keuuerU-Hlekman bUx k. Lemon street
PHYSICIANS.
OI.K, TH A r-, HombWathist,
Raum block. Lemon street
CYRI S, Ir W H .
Moratrne bloi k, Lemon street, upstairs
REAL ESTATE
3URT. JAMES ,,"'
Town loti, Palatka Heights.
HEALY & TRIAY
Board of Trade Room, Front street
. PHiHtka National Bank building. Front st
SALOONS.
EDW A TtDS, A N tX.,
Hart's lock. Water street
IDA IH SaLOON . .
Twir VHlmettoce, Iemon street
Vi-CTM UIMV
Lemon street, near J T K W Junction
SASH. DOORS AND BLINDS
mpves -r
Palatka National Bank buildintf. Front s
TAILORING.
tfUIXIXfiPK . .
Over Loab'e store. Lemon street, upstair
TAXIDERMIST.
irwr. w s
Front street, three doors south of Lemon
UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALMERS.
NOW. W C
No 30 Front street
WAGON FACTORY.
ACB & MARTIN "
. River street, near Gas Works
WOOD YARD -D
ALTON. M H
Foot f 4du is straet.
AT-WASH 1NGT0N
SENATE PASSES SEVERAL BILLS.
BLAIR'S PET WILL BE VOTED ON
WEDNESDAY.
Riddlebereer Insists on His Treaty
Resolution.
Dramatic Situation In the Senate wniie
Clearing the Galleries Preparatory
to a Secret Session.
SENATE.
Washington, Februarys. luo reso
lution offered some days since by Frye.
instructing the Committee on Foreign Re
lations to prepare a statement showing
the political organization of the Dominion
of Canada and of the several provinces
of which it is composed, and of the geo
graphica 1 relations sustained by them to
the United States and various other mat
ters, was taken up and adopted.
BILLS PASSED.
A bill was passed appropriating $1,200,-
000 for a public building for Kansas
City.
RELIEF FOR BREEDERS.
The bill for the relief of importers of
animals for breeding purposes in certain
cases was taken up and passed. It di
rects the Secretary of the Treasury to
remit all duties upon importations of
animals for breeding purposes, whether
imported for the importer's own use or
for sale, and provides that the fact of
such importation shall be sufficient de
fense in any pending action.
RIDDLEBERGER AGAIN.
Mr. Riddleberger took the floor and
objected to the consideration of anynat
ter to which objection could be made
during the time assigned for morning
business, until he could have action on
the resolution offered by him some weeks
since, to have the British extradition
treaty considered in open session. Af
ter he had been speaking for ten or fif
teen minutes he was ruled out of order
and directed to take his seat.
PORTER ACADEMY BILL PASSED.
On motion of Mr. Butler the bill au
thorizing the Secretary of War to trans
fer to the trustees of the Porter academy
property in the city of Charleston, S. C,
was taken from calendar and passed.
THE BLAIR BILL.
The Senate then, at 2:10, took up as
unfinished business the Blair Educational
bill. Mr. Blair said that so far as he
could judge of the condition of the de
bate, the bill might be disposed of by the
Senate to-day certainly if the session
were slightly prolonged. In any event
he would ask the Senate to dispose of it
to-morrow.
CALLS OPINION.
Mr. Call spoke in support of the bill.
If he could lelieve, he said, that the
evils foretold by the enemies of the bill
would follow its enactment, lie would
vote against it, although he had voted
twice for it. But he did not so believe,
As to the constitutional objection made
to it, he said that the quotations from
Jefferson and Madison and early fathers
of the republic, were nearly 100 years
old, and that these interpretations had
been over-ridden, every one of them, by
the practice of the Government and with
the acquiescence of the people.
At the close of Call's remarks Mr.
Blair asked to have the time fixed for
the vote on the bill and pending amend
ments, and he suggested 4 o'clock to
morrow.
JIR. PLITMB WANTS TO SPEAK.
Mr. riumb objected to that. He would
be glad to have the time fixed, but
further in the future. He would have
something to Bay about the bill, but he
was not prepared with statistics which
he wanted to use. Another Senator had
informed hint that he also wished to
speak. He suggested next Wednesday
at 3 o'clock, and Blair accepted that sug
gestion and unanimous consent was
given to it.
Mr. Harris moved to proceed to execu
tive business, but he offered to withdraw
the motion in order to have a vote on
Riddleberger's resolution, provided it
could be had without any discussion.
Riddleberger declared that he would
make no conditions as to the resolution
treaty, and demanded the yeas and
nays on the motion to go into executive
session. The Senate then voted (43 to 9)
to proceed to executive business, Riddle
berger vol ing in the affirmative.
DRAMATIC
A dramatic, though momentary scene
followed. Riddleberger arose as the
Chair announced the vote and attempted
to speak. The Chair directed, as usual.
that the Sergeant-at-Arms will clear the
galleries and close the doors. The SeDa
tor from Virginia, who has a bronchial
affection which renders it difficult for
him to make himself audible and pale
with excitement, said: "I beg pardon.
sir, I arise to move a reconsideration of
the vote." (A pause during which the
Sergeant-at-Arms was executing - bia
office.) "Have I net the right, sir, to
move a reconsideration ? I voted in the
affirmative for that purpose.'' (A fur
ther pause.) -I have the right and no
Sereeant-at-Arms can restrain me
from" .
The closing of the doors shut off the
further proceedings from the public ear.
It is understood that the Senator from
Virginia continued his remarks, but di
rected them against the substance of the
British treaty, and that he consumed
the time until 4:55, at which hour the
Senate adjourned.
HOrSE.
Washington, February 8. In consid-
j eration in the morning hour, the House
resumed consideration of the bill making
i bills of lading conclusive evidence in
PALiATEA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY
certain cases, and it
following is the text:
BILLS OF LADING CONCLUSIVE EYIDE-M.K.
"Tbat whprver anv common carrier
by land or water, or its agent author
ized to execute and deliver Dius oi lau i ng,
signs and delivers any bill of lading or
instrument in the nature thereof pur--nortine
to be for goods, .wares, or mer
chandise received by such carrier for
transportation from one State to another
within the United States, or to any for-
country, Buch bill of lading
rf lnatrlirilPnT. Ill VliC
thereof in the hands of any
bona fide holder for valuable considera
tion, who acquired the same in the usual
course of trade without any notice of
any defect therein, shall be conclusive
evidence that the goods described there
in were actually received by such car
rier in tne manner anu lor mo jjuiwc ,
as therein slated."
THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF FIVE.
The Speaker announced the appoint
ment of the following members of the
special committee to investigate the ex
isting labor troubles m PennsykfUma:
Tillman of South Carolina, fetone or
Missouri, Chipman of Michigan, Ander
son of Kansas, and Parker of New
York. '
ADJOCRNED.
The House, then, at 8:45, adjourned.
DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS.
Members of the Democrat Ic Congressional Com-
' mi ties Sslectea.
Washington, February 8. The cau
cus of the Dt'Piocratic members of the
Hrmnn whirr. w.Ti!fHKfor this after
noon for the purpose of selecting repre
sentatives on the Democratic lSEgres-
sional Committee, resulted in the choice
of the following: Alabama, James T.
Jones; Arkansas, Thomas C. McRae;
California, T. L. Thompson; Connecticut,
R. J. Vance; Delaware, J. B. Penning
ton; Florida, R. H. M. Davidson; Geor
gia, T. W. Grimes; Illinois, R. W. Town-
shend; Indiana, Benjamin F. Shively;
Iowa, W. I. Hayes; Kentucky, W. T.
Taulbee; Louisiana, M. B. Logan; Mary
land, Barnes Compton; Michigan, S. O.
Fisher; Mississippi, J. M. Allen; Minne
sota, J. L. MacDonald; Missouri, James
N. Burnes; Nebaska, J. A. McShane;
New Hampshire, L. F. McKin
ney; New Jersey, William McAdoo;
New York, L. S. Bryce; North
Carolina, F. M. Simmons; Ohio,
Beriah Wilkins; South Carolina, Samuel
Dibble; Tennessee, Benton McMillen;
Texas, W. H. Martin; Virginia, G. D.
Wise; West Virginia, C. E. Hogg; Wis
consin, i nomas a. iiuad; Arizona, M.
A. Smith; Montana, J. R. Toole; New
Mexico, A. Joseph; Utah, J. T. Caine;
Washington Territory, C. S. Voorhees.
In the case of States where there are
no Democratic Representatives, or where
the delegations failed to make selec
tions, the full committee is granted
power to fill vacancies in the represen
tation. - The first person named, Jones
of Alabama, was authorized to call the
committee together for the purpose of
organization.
OUR MILITIA FORCE.
Statement by the Secretary of War Msde to
Congress.
Washington, February 8. The Sec
retary of War to-day transmitted to
Congress a tabulated statement of the
militia force of the United States which
shows that at the last returns there were
eighty-two general officers, 1,105 officers
of the general staff, 1,638 officers regi
mental, field and staff, and 5,885 com
pany officers; making a total of 8,210
commissioned officers. There were
18,331 non-commissioned officers, 3,900
musicians and 71,396 privates, making
in all 92,627 enlisted men, and a grand
total (officers and men) for the militia
forces of 100,837 men. The number of
men available for military duty (unor
ganized) is set down at 7,920.768, but in
some cases the figures are based upon es-
mates made in the War DeDartment.
THE STATISTICIAN TROUBLE.
Man; Persons Appealing to Commissioner
Cole-
man to Retain Him.
Washington, February 8. Commis
sioner Coleman, of the Agricultural De
partment, said to-day in reply to an
inquiry that he liad not received the
resignation of Statistician Dodge. The
commissioner, it is stated, is placed in
an embarrassing position by the request
made of liim in the formal petition from
members of Congress asking for Dodge's
removal. The opposition to Dodge
arises from objections made by persons
interested in tg tobacco trade to Dodge's
statistics concerning the tobacco crop.
On the other band, many persons are
appealing to Commissioner Coleman to
retain Dodge. Among others seventy
five members of the New York Cotton
Exchange have sent a petition to Com
missioner Coleman taking for Dodge's
retention. This petition savs: "Although
many of us differ at times with him in
his cotton crop reports, yet we are fully
aware that Dodge is the compiler and
not the author of them, and believe him
to be an honest and careful public ser
vant." "
Surrender: bj His Bondsmen.
Cincinnati, February 8. John R.
DeCamp, lately vice president of the
Metropolitan Bank, has been surrendered
by his bondsmen, John Carlisle and
Albert Netter, and is now in charge of a
United States Deputy Marshal. He has
not been committed to jail, but is calling
upon his friends to come and go his
bond.
John R. DeCamp, after being under
custody in the United States Commis
sioner's office from noon nntil 3:30 p. m.,
obtained four bondsmen and was re
leased. Albert Netter reconsidered his
action and signed the bond. The others
were W. F. DeCamp, Henry C. Gilmour
and Richard Smith.
The Cigar Makers Win.
Boston, February 8. The backbone
of the cigar manufacturers' strike was
broken last night when Alles & Fisher
sent for their seventy-five men and in
formed them that they could return to
work to-day on the onion bill of prices.
The striken are jubilant and feel justi
fied in believing that the balance of the
association will not hold out further than
i Saturday night.
was passeu. iim i
Meeting of the Bar Associatlon-Tre Threo Day'
Jubilee.
Soefial to the Palatka Xnrx.
Jacksonville, February 8. There are
over 203 members of the State Bar As
sociation, but only a few were present
this morning at the court iiouse. where
the session was held. The opening was
advertised to take place at 10 o clock,
but it was nearly 12 bafore the meeting
was called to order. Hon. S. Y. Finley
was elected chairman in the absence of
President J. B. Wall, who was unable to
come.
The following gentlemen were present:
S. Y. Finley, chairman; C. O. Hampton,
secretary, both of Gainesville; B. F.
Liddon, Frank Carter, Marianna; R. H.
Williams, Tallahassee; J. G. Reardon,
Ocala; Judge Stuart, Jasper; E. Badger.
Ocala; John Smith, E. T. Hamlin, De-
Land; Judge J. B. Christie, J. R. Chal-
len, E. M. L'Engle, D. V. Dawkms. ic-
tor Mudge, C. M. McBride, W. P. Ward
and M. C. Jordon, of this city.
Nothing important was done beyond
organizing the association and getting
into shape for the afternoon session.
Hon. Emery gpeer, of Macon, United
States Judge for the Southern District
of Georgia, is in the city and will deliver
an address at the Park Opera House this
evening at 8 o'clock. Judge Speer is
noted for his oratory. The public is in
vited. The Opera House will be packed
to hear the brilliajut gentleman's re
marks. The Jacksonville Foot Ball Associa
tion will have an interesting game of
foot ball this afternoon at the old Fair
Grounds.
Mr. A. D. Biedler, of the big dry goods
firm 6f "Sy;ltz, Biedler & Co., of Balti
more, has Durcliast " toclt of gents'
furnishing goods owned by M. TJTFloyd,
of the Everett block, and will make
Jacksonville his future home.
The greatest event of the season at the
Sub-Tropical will be a three days' jubi
lee, including six grand concerts by Gil
more's Band, ' the greatest musical at
traction in the world, and one that has
never been south before. The exact
dates of these concerts will be announced
in due time. J. E. S.
FROM OCALA.
Matters In That Thriving City Prof. Proctor's
Fsmilj Club House.
Special to the Pa'atha A'cio.
Ocala, Fla., February 8. Mr. J. N.
Strobhar, the principal agent of the
Florida Southern Railway at this place,
has been temporarily assigned to the of
fice of that company at 29 West Bay
street, Jacksonville.
Mr. James O. Clark has just been ap
pointed assistant to Mr. C. W. Campbell
as Marion County's agent at the Sub
Tropical by the Board of County Com
missioners. Mrs. and Miss Proctor, of Oaklawn,
Fla., the wife and daughter of the dis
tinguished and well known Professor
Richard Proctor, are at the Ocala House.
The thirty-two piece minstrel com
pany of Mclntire & Heath, gave an en
tertaining performance to the fun-loving
citizens of Ocala, at the Marion Opera
House last night.
Prominent members of a Boston club
have bought six lots in Dun's northwest
addition to Ocala, and propose to erect
a club house as a winter resort.
R. Y. A. N.
FROM WASHINGTON.
Denial of a New York Herald Statement Assistant
Postmaster General Coming South.
Special to the raltitha A"eit.
Washington, February 8.
Commissioner Coleman denies the
New York Herald's special that he has
the resignation of Mr. Dodge, the statis
tician of the Department of Agriculture
in his pocket.
Miss Acklen, of this city, has gone to
St. Augustine to join her brother, Mr.
W. Acklen. They will sjiend a couple of
months in the Ancient City.
Mr. Choate, the St. Augustine repre
sentative of The News, arrived in this
city from New York last night, and
leaves for home to-morrow.
Assistant Postmaster General Steven
son left this morning for Florida and the
South on a two weeks' vacation. X.
American Newspaper Publishers' Association.
Indianapolis, Ind., February 8. The
executive committee of the American
Newspaper Publishers' Association met
at the Denison Hotel yesterday in ad
vance of the annual meeting of the as
sociation, which takes place to-day. A
conference was held with the leading ad
vertising agents of the United States
with a view to arranging reforms in the
methods of doing business between ad
vertisers and papers. There is a large
attendance of newspaper men from all
parts of the country and the annual
meeting bids fair to be very successful.
HEROIC MISS B0YCE.
Both of Her Feet Amputated and Her Left Arm
Badly Deformed.
Plain view, Neb., February 8. Miss
Louise M. Boyce, the school teacher who
lay on the prairie all night during the
recent blizzard with three of her pupils,
all of whom died in her arms, had both
feet amputated here yesterday. Her
left arm is badly deformed by large
pieces of flesh dropping off, but the phy
sicians say it will probably not be neces
sary to amputate it.
FOUND MURDERED.
Amos J. Suell. a Millionaire, Killed
Ia
His Ilonae by Bnrslars.
Chicago, February 8. Amos J. Snell,
who was the owner of the toll road run
ning through Jefferson, was found mur
dered this morning at his residence. No.
425 Washington boulevard. Snell was
rated at $3,000,000 and owned a large
number of houses. He had the front
basement of LU house fitted up as an of
fice, with several large safes, desks, etc.
His office was entered last night by
burglars, and there is no doubt that he
heard them in his house and taking his
revolver went to investigate. Hearing
the intruders at work, he fired through
the door at them. They opened the door
and returned the fire and shot Snell in
the breast. Snell must then have re
treated and the burglars followed, aa
Snell was found at the head of the base-
MORNING, FEBRUARY-9, 1SS8.
nient stairs with a bullet behind his ear.
Snell's family were absent except two
servant giils and two little grandchil
dren. What the burglars secured may
never he known, but Snell's business
habits preclude the possibility of their
realizing much, as he never kept large
amonts of money or negotiable paper in
his house.
Amendments to be Submitted.
Jackson, Miss., February 8. The
Senate to-day by a two-thirds vote
passed a resolution on its first reading
submitting to a vote of the people at the
next election of two constitutional
amendments. One restricting the ten
ure of the office of the Governor to one
term of four years, and the other making
the judiciary elective by the people
instead of being appointed by the Gov
ernor. Shot at a Dor aid Hit a Book A cent.
Charleston, S. C, February 8. At
Blackville this morning J. D. Whitle
shot at a dog going out of his gate. He
missed the dog but hit a book agent from
Richmond, Va., named Sampson, who
was walking on the railroad track a hun
dred yards distant. Sampson's wound
is painful but not fatal.
Baltimor and Ohio at 95.
Baltimore, February 8. Sixty shares
of Baltimore and Ohio Railway stock
sold to-day at 95. This U the lowest
figure reached for a number of years,
and is said to result from the probability
that the road may not declare adividend
for several years to come. It is thought
the shares will go still lower.
Smugglers Captured.
Watertown, N. Y., February 8. The
United States customs officials last night
captured a sleigh containing $22,000
worth of opium, w hich was being smug-
4aross the boundary line near Red
wood in this'county.XUS sP:i1sK'ern'rr
owner of the slcign were arrested and
taken to Ogdensburg.
Fostponement of the Treaty.
Washington, February 8. It is re-
ported that the Senate in sec ret session
this afternoon postponed further consid-
eration of the British extradition treaty
until next December.
Indorse Cleveland.
Annapolis, Md., February 8. The
House of Delegates to-day passed reso
lutions indorsing President Cleveland's
administration and his recent message
by a vote of 53 to 16.
Gen. Anderson, of Savanuab, lead.
Savannah, Ga., Februarys. General
Robert H. Anderson, chief of police of
Savannah, died here to-day of pneu
monia. Gladstone's Welcome iu England.
London, February 8. Gladstone ar
rived at Dover ' this afternoon. He
received a most enthusiastic greeting
from a large crowd that had gathered to
meet him. Upon his arrival at t lie
Charing Cross Station this evening he
was received with mingled cheers and
hootings. There was an enormous crowd
of people in and around the station when
he arrived.
Arrests and Conviction.
Dublin, February 8. Patrick O'Brien,
M. P., was to-day sentenced to three
months' imprisonment by the Kilkenny
court for inciting tenants not to pay
rent. O'Brien appealed and was released
on bail. Mr. Flynn, member of Parlia
ment for North Cork, was arrested to
day and was afterwards admitted to
bail.
The Pope Advises the Irish Bishops.
Rome, February 8. The Pope has re
quested Cardinal Simeoni to advise the
Irish bishops to preach to the people of
Ireland respect for the laws and to main
tain a calm and prudent line of conduct.
The Pope has also announced his inten
tion to send to Ireland a permanent
apostolic legate.
Wilxon Summoned to Appear.
Paris, February 8. Wilson has been
summoned to appear before the tribunal
or correction reoruary its, to answer
charges connected with the decorating
of M. Legrande. M. Crespin, the exam
ining magistrate, has advised that Wil
son be prosecuted in the police court.
Ioctors Kesolve on Tracheotomy.
San Remo, February 8. The Cjpwn
fnnce experiences difficulty in breath
ing. It is reported that the doctors
have resolved to resort to tracheotomy
immediately as further delay might re
sult iu suffocation.
The Military Kill Pasxed.
Berlin, February 8. The military bill
was read the second time in the Reich
stag to-day and was passed as a whole.
(Quarreling With the Commission.
Fort Otrden News.
If the members of the Railroad Com
missioners of Florida have drawn thefr
salaries, ttieir mission is now accom
plished. The highest rates of travel
have been sustained by them, as far as
our readers are concerned, and every
section of the country is grumbling over
an advance on short line , f reigh'. It is
hard to admt. but it does not set that
the question of rates was an m of
contract with any of the Florida rail
road charters, and if we do not want to
ride we can walk, with the same old
principles of competition, supply and
demand, at our disposal. When "we re
call the failure of the attempt to fix the
prices of all commodities at the dark pe
riod of the American Revolution, and
still later in the early French Republic,
it begins to dawn upon us that we are a
little behind th times, and wasting too
much labor on tne bungtiole while the
spiggot is wide open. Let commercial
principles rule in commerce and the
learned commission rule upon the bench,
where they are more familiar with the
surroundings, and their astute poise be
fore the public does not lose its "tute
appearance.
He Was There.
Watertown Times.
A Syracuse dry goods merchant baa
posted a placard containing the follow
ing on his store door: "Don't try to open
this door. I am Sick.and when I am Well
I will be able to Open it Myself."
Different Oaths.
St. Louis Poet-Dispatch.
Justice Lamar took the modified oath
on entering his new office, but there was
no modification about the oaths which
Bill Chandler and Murat Halstead used
on the same occasion.
An Able Paper.
Macon Telegraph.
The able Thomasville Enterprise thinJ 3
the tariff is a very insignificant issr e.
Thomasville is full of smart men v ho
pity the stupidity of the outside wrrld.
ABOUT TREATIES.
WHAT BELMONT KNOWS OF THEM.
THAT WITH CHINA AND THE ONE
' WITH ENGLAND.
Speedy Settlement of the Chinese Question-No
Politiral Extradition Clauae
ia the Britih Treaty.
Washinqtos, February 8. An Asso
ciated Press reporter obtained to-day
from Representative Belmont, chairman
of the House Committee on Foreign Af
fairs, an important statement with re
gard to the Chinese question, and also
as to the pending treaty with Great
Britain. It reply to questions of the re
porter, Belmont said he felt he could
properly state that negotiations had
been pending for some time for an
amicable settlement of the Chinese ques
tion. They had been susjiended during
the summer in consequence of the ab
sence of the Chinese minister, but hud
now been resumed and were reaching
completion. We understand, in fact,
that a draft of the proposed treaty had
been transmitted to the Chinese minister
to-day, containing such modifications of
existing treaties as would bring about
the complete exclusion of that ola. of
emigrants Hir'tr
people of the
western coast objected.
It was only just to the Chinese Gov-
ernment to say that there was no dispo-
8ition on their I"? to 8taml in the W87
of ch an agreement and he believed
there was a strong prospect that within
a nth we would have a treaty which
woula enectuaiiy dispose of the question.
" wouiu, oi course, be necessary for
I Congress to enact legislation to carry
I nut tlt riiirruwa ff anoli t - an1
therefore it was desirable that the bills
now pending before the House should
not be hastily acted upon. If there
should be a failure of negotiations, which
did not seem likely, Congress would be
informed in ample time to pass inde
pendent legislation.
Belmont further said that any treaty
arrangements with China to prevent
Chinese immigration would of course
have to be supplemented by some strin
gent legislation, and perhaps even by
eome treaty stipulations with Great
Britain to suppress the introduction of
Chinese coolie labor by wav of Hon:
jvong ana Vancouver, Dy wnicu our
present restrictive laws were largely
avoided. It was understood there woidd
be no difficulty on that score.
Speaking of the pending treaty with
Great Britain, Belmont said as the mat.
ter had been so widely discussed through
the newspapers, he thought it only just
to the administration that it should be
known that no clause permitting the ex
tradition of citizens of the United States
for any political offense was included in
the treaty sent to the Senate. If there
was any such provision now under con
sideration, it must have been inserted as
an amendment in the Senate. He de
clared emphatically that there was no
clause in the treaty as submitted to the
Senate which surrenders any right which
this Government has always upheld, nor
was there aDy provisions which could
be construed as permitting a surrender
on account of political offenses.
CONGREGATIONAL CONFERENCE.
First and Second Days' Proceedings of the State
Association.
Orrrenpontience of the Palatka Ifetct.
Interlachen. February 8.
The fifth annual meeting of the Gen
eral Congregational Association of Flor
ida, convened at the Fii-st Congrega
tional Church on Tuesday evening, Feb
ruary i. i lie opening exercises were
conducted by Rev. W. B. Benedict, of
Orange Park, and Rev. E. P. Hooper,
of Rollins College, Winter Park. The
sermon was preached by the Rev. B. T.
Stafford, of Norwalk, from the text
found in 1 Cor. xv, 3: "I delivered unto
you, first of all, that which I also re
ceived, how tliat Christ died for our
sins according to the Scriptures." The
first thing Paul had to tell on all occa
sions, was the gospel of love and recon
ciliation. Of other things he knew
enough to be intensely interesting, but
he only delivered first of all thw gospel,
because by its acceptance he had been
saved from a state of narrowness in sym
pathy and desire, to the life of constant
enlargement in all man-building things,
It was the apostle's chief desire to make
this gospel known to all listening ears,
The divine voice hag spoken to the effec-
that condemnation has been removed
from all who turn away from evil and
learn to do well. The gospel, then, is the
revelation of the divine thought to men.
Such magnificent love is always reliable
and trustworthy. It is the source of
purpose and aspiration, it forms the
constructive principle of character and
fills the life with the enthusiasm of the
right sort-
After the sermon a business meeting
at which the Rev. S. V. McDuffee was
chosen Moderator; L. C. Partridge.
Longwood, Asssistant Moderator; Prof.
Barrows, M. D., of Winter Park, Scribe
and W. F Cathcart', of Tangerine, As
sistant Scribe. The Association then ad
journed till 8:30 a. m., February 8,
Wednesday: 850 a. m. The meeting
was called to order by the Moderator,
and business occupied the attention of
the conference until 9:15, when a
gen-
eral report of the state of religion in the
churches was made by Rev. Sidney
Crawford, of Tampa, Secretary of the
Association, supplemented by reports
from pastors and delegates.
At 10 a. m. the audience listened to
the report of the obituary committee by
Prof. Barrows, of Winter Park.
At 10:13 the Sunday School secretary,
Mrs. Charles Parker, of Orange City,
made an 'nteresting report.
- At 11:00 devotional exercises were led
by Rev. A. B. Dilley, of Lake Worth.
Atll:30lav. J. Cadawallader inter
ested the audience by remarks on Bible
reading and healing of the body in an
swer to prayer.
Wednesday, 2 p. m. Business oc
cupied the hour from 2 to 3 o'clock. At
2:30 the ladies missionary meeting was
held in the parlors of Hotel Interlachen.
At 3 o'clock the subject of denomina
tional literature and the church's obliga
tion to it was the subject of discussion
and waa 11 by Rev. & D. Smith, of
Winter Park.
At 3:30 the Rev. Mason Noble, of Or
iole, led the discussion on the need of
evangelical work in our churches.
At 4 p. m. the discussion on the meth
ods of carrying on such work was par
ticipated in by Rev. A. T. Clark, of
New Smyrna, Thomas Jewetf t of Tan
gerine, and F. C. Nettleton, Esq., of
Lake Helen.
The meeting adjourned to the Hotel
Interlachen where the ladies of the
church and society entertained the mem
bers of the Association, and the citizens
with refreshments. This social proved
one of the most interesting features of
the meeting of the Association.
WELAKA.
liKOStmsnts-
-Tho Stroot Question An
Amateur
Minstrel Entertainment.
CorTtKixmdrtiet of the PalitiKa Arm.
Welaka, February 8.
Fertilizer everywhere, orange bloom,
ditto. Lovely weather? Delightful!
Improvements are still going on, lot
thoee who neglect their sidewalks and
fence corners, look on the energy of
others and blush.
Mr. J. R. Hughes has made a further
investment of town property. He has
purchased two lots in block forty-one
the property of Mr, C. S. Stephens and
is nou uiae.!. .j-d i. i .jfjiiu.tli.!fis.
Mr. L. Bennett and wife accompanied
by Mr. Brown all of Rhode Island, have
arrived and will remain for the season.
Mr. E. Combs was seen on the streets
yesterday accompanied by a long string
of fine trout.
Mr. C. S. debits our energetic moss
mattress manufacturer has his hands
full, and informs us that he will enlarge
his business soon and make lounges and
other upholstered furniture. Mr. Gehita
is a good workman and invariably gives
satisfaction.
Welaka is going to have a gala week
soon.
The street question still remains in an
unsatisfactory condition. This wretched
nightmare hangs over us in the most
unaccountable manner. Why cannot
the matter be adjusted? Empires have
been made and unmade in less time by
one man than it has taken seven men to
settle a small question like this. It is the
only thing that has been tried, red tape,
blunderings and petitions, the table is
crowded, a number of motions have
fallen under the table, and it is not half
done yet.
Mr. L. Morris succeeded in capturing
a splendid specimen of the eagle the
other day. It measured seven feet from
tip to tip of the wings. It was caught
by one claw in a trap.
WELAKA DRAMATIC ASSOCIATION.
The Association introduced a new fea
ture into its performance on Friday
last,and discovered an inexhaustible fund
for amusement in the members who
took part in the minstrel and variety en
tertainment on that evening. Owing to
the unfortunate and much regretted ill
ness of Mr. J. Cole, the musical portion,
as far as the songs went was not as great
a success as it would have been had Mr
Cole been present with his banjo. Mr.
George Russell was the "star of the
evening." His Dutch speech and song,
and his darkey varieties were capitally
rendered, and earned hearty and well
deserved applause. The comic song ren
dered by Mr. Combs, "There's nothing
in it," was much appreciated, and re
ceived an encore. The following took
part: Messrs. F. C Cochrane, C. F.
Waldron, S. Pastorfield, Gaorge Russell,
J. Russell Kennedy and E. Combs, and
each and all took the parts assigned to
them well.
A new feature in the jierformance was
the orchestral jierforniance of Mr. C. S.
Packard on the violin, Mr. R. H. Hotch
kin on the cornet and. Mrs. Winston Ste
phens as organist. The pieces were well
rendered and heartily encored, and lov
ers of music may exiiect much from the
future performance of this trio orches
tra. We understand that Miss Waldron
and her brother. Mr. D. F. Waldron.
who have so long lent their kind and
much appreciated musical aid to the as
sociation, will alternate with them. .
SATSUMA HIGHTS.
Preparation for the Inaugural Meeting of
the
I. 0. 0. F. Ledge-Interesting Jottings.
CurreriMntUnee of the PaUUka A'ewt.
Satscma Hights, February 8.
Prof. A. Williams arrived from Win
ter Haven last Saturday. He has brought
from his place there some remarkably
fine orange and lemon trees, which he
has planted on his grove here. Among
the varieties of lemons we notice the
Villa Franca and Foot Thorn less, both of
which are just now attracting great at
tention in Polk County. The last named
variety was introduced by the Rev. Geo,
Jackson, of Winter Haven.
Alterations are being made in the hall
over Messrs. Hinks & Coates' store, pre
paratory to the inaugural meeting of the
L O. O. F. Lodge, which will take place
on Saturday next, unless prevented by
untoreseen circumstances. Ante and re
galia rooms are being added to the halL
Mr. James Greenwood, ot Linda, has
been planting trees on Mr. C. B. Martin's
place during the week. Mr. Martin was
so pleased with his purchasj that he or
dered another lot of trees, which will be
put in this week.
We were agreeably surprised at re-
I ceiving some samples of lace goods and
everlasting edgings from Messrs. Hinks
& Coates, who have imported a large
parcel of these goods from England, we
advise all our lady readers to write for
patterns.
Orange, peach trees and vegetables
are putting on an abundant growth after
the refreshing rains we have had, and if
we receive no more checks from the
"Frozen North" young groves in this
section will present a very fine appear
ance in tbe tall. '
Various varieties of thepeachare being
NUMBER 28'
planted here. The favorite way of plant
ing is in the middle of the square formed
by four orange trees.
We regret the departure of Miss Gil
lett, of Interlachen,' who for the past
week lias been the guest of Mrs. G. V. "
Peer.
We understand that Mr. W. S. Bent
ley, the agent for Mapea" fertilizers in
this settlement, has been doing a very
good business. Ie firmly believes that
Mapes' fertilizers will produce good re
sults. Mr. Milan Cole has been drumming in
this section for the humo fertilizer.
Semper Paratts.
ADDITIONAL LOCAL.
THE YACHT EACH
The Wanderer Wins Ona Leg of the Tlustla
Placqne by a Close Shave.
The yacht race yesterday evening was
very exciting. Although the yachts
were not very attractive, the breeze was
from the west and blew great guus,
while the boys Liy at tho dock waiting
for a start. This made the crew on board
the Wanderer more cheerful, while the
boys on the Bertha and Martha wre
hunting for reef points and lanyards.
Promptly at 2::0 o'clock the starting
signal was given and the Wanderer,
Capt, Glady, crossed the line first under
full sail. The Martha and Bertha fol
lowed aliout one minute apart both un
der single reefed sails. When they had
well gotten under way the Martha
shook out her reef. At the first bony
the Wanderer got well the lead by
shaving the buoy close. When the
Bertha gybed her boom struck the water
and everybody thought she had gone
over, but she gathered herself up and on
she went passing tbe Bertha and gaining
rapidly on tiie VV andeier. At the last
buoy she had caught well up with her
competitor but when they turned
the old salt on the Wanderer made a
close shave again and the Bertha mis
stayed and lost more than she had
gained. At the start of the second round
the Bertha shook out her reefs and held
her own to the finish. The Wanderer
was excellently sailed throughout the
race and it was plain to be seen that it
was all in the handling. The Martha
was well sailed by Capt. Broward, and
it was the general opinion that she did
her best.
The Jessie sailed over the course but
her time was not taken as she was not
in the race. The following was the time:
actual time.
STAKT.
Wanderer.. :TO:i5
Martha .. . 2:400
Cerlha 2:10 45
FIRST LAP.
3:06:30
3:10:13
3:10:111)
FINISH.
3:38:05
3:38.l
3:J8:15
ELAPSED TIME.
SKC.
SO
80
30
Wanderer 58
Bertha ' 58
Martha 58
The Wanderer has about six seconds
time allowance off the Bertha and the
Bertha has about the same off the
Martha.
The judges were B. IL Enos and C. II.
Glilden.
Mclntyre St Heath's Minstrels.
Fry's Opera House was packed last
night with Palatka's amusement-loving
citizens, to witness Mclntyre & Heath's
Minstrels. This troupe is excellent, and
the performance rendered last evening
was very creditable to every member of
the company, each and every part being
offered in a masterly way, while the
comicalities of the situation kept the
house in a constant uproar especially
the great local hits of the leading com
edian, Billy Buckley.
There was evidently great trouble in
arranging so large a company on such
an "inconveniently small stage. The .
tronpe will appear in St, Augustine to
night and deserve an overflowing house.
Money Wasted la "Foundations."
IJoston Herald.
We are wont to smile at the "foun
dations" in England which have outlived
their usefulness, because all the condi-
tions have changed. Take the case of
the pious old gentleman who, 200 or 300
years ago, lett a sum of money in the
hands of trustees, the interest to be used
for all time, to support a clenrvrr.an
who should preach a sermon every day
in a certain church located in what was
then the most populous part of London.
rroui nis point . or view. it
was doubtless a good thins? in
those days, but how is it now?
The whole district is given up to busi
ness. The preaching goes on just tha
same, but there ia no congregation. The
iortunate possessor ot the "living" never
goes near the church, but hires a cheap
curate to do the preaching to the empty
seats, jience we smne. uut are not
things drifting in the same direction
here? The divinity school at Harvard is
richly endowed, it" has an overstock of
professors assistant professors and
tutors, and so many free scholar
ships that the dues are practically
nothing, and yet it has more in
structors than students, and the number
of the latter seems to be gradually but
Bieauuy uetreasing. 1UI people will go
right on leaving money to it as a sort of
expiration for their sins, and it is not im
probable that the time will come when
its funds will be double what they now
are. and the number of its students re
duced one half. Meantime other depart
ments of the university are really short
of money. What Is wanted is more dis
crimination and lees superstition.
Citrus Comity's Postal Facilities.
Citrus Star.
If there is any public improvement '
Citrus County needs more than another,
it is better man service. it seems ridi
culous tliat in order to send a letter, say
from Mannfleld to Floral City, or Tomp.
kinsviiie, a distance of eight or ten
miles, it is necessary to send it to Brooks-
viJle, seventeen miles in the opposite di
rection, taking it from three to live days
to reach its destination. The result of
this state of things is. that much of th
corres)ondence between the places men-
uoueu is uone inrougn private channels.
it is true mat citrus is a new county,
but it would seem but reasonhl that
every poetoffice in it should have daily,
or at the farthest, tri-weekly postal com-
BiumuuHai wiin me county seat. The .
United States Post Office Drmrtmontif -
the public service is more than paying
its running expenses, and w believe if
representations of our situation wera
made to the proper anthoritieo. taster
postal facilities than we now enjov
would be granted, and tbe Mansfield
post office would be raised to the dig
nity of a money order office and be au
thorized to pay money orders and postal
notes. -
Too Particular.
Atlanta Journal. r- : V
The Detroit Free Pre does not think
a Sunday newspaper ought to lie. Tha .
i Free Pit is growing j articular in it
1 old age.

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