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The Palatka daily news. (Palatka, Fla.) 1884-1888, February 12, 1888, Image 1

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PAJLATKA DAILY NEW:
ME
PALATKA, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MOKISTING, FEBRUARY 12, 18SS.
NUMBER 290.
VOLUME IV.
CITY DIRECTORY.
APOTHECARIES.
AfKERMAN STEWART,
A .mhwrwt corner Umoo and Front.
KNori S"coni Lemon and Front.
Fn ,nt Ht nt, four doors north of post office.
PEll!.rnn street, naum block.
V(!trlu Irua Store, Lemon street.
ATTORNEYS
BAISK Fla.
CA KnViVrlortu'r Held, offices upstairs.
-PaSonalBanl, BuUdin,
"0"a'kruV"kyiinonrtreet; office upstairs.
BANGOR ORANCE BOXES.
EA tot of laurel near IT4KW depot.
BANKS.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK. .
W J Wiucnar, President, Front street
BARBERS.
f,KSnrtwt, opposite Putnam House.
MOHK, FRANK
Fall block. Lemon street.
BOARD OF TRADE.
OFFICE. NO. 28 FRONT STREET.
Visitors In the city wishing information
will be cheerfully supplied.
BOARDING HOUSES.
una run aiTTOHINSnW.
Hoarding and Dining- Hoom.Water and Main
books and stationery.
Cochrane, fo '.'.-,
Front street, next door to post office.
BOOTS AND SHOES.
VATTERL1N, HT "
Moi ug-ne block. Lemon street.
BOOK BINDERS.
PAtATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY,
, Keid street.
BOOT AND SHOE MAKING AND REPAIRING.
Fr.i.trt."iKdoor south of First Nat Bank
Pnam House.
CANDY MANUFACTURERS.
BMTTH, H4E J ..,.'
No Lemon street, Gillis block.
CIGARS AND TOBACCOS.
KtTPPERBlTSCH, CHA8 . . m
I'utimm Onllery, Lemon street, op Putnum
SMITH. R & E J
No 8 Lemon street Gillis block.
CISTERNS AND TANKS.
TAAKLAne? proprietor. Water street, near
J T & K W depoU
CIVIL ENGINEERING.
' jaty Hnrvevor, Nos. 3 and 4 Moragne block,
over KerstluK's.
CLOTHING AND GENTS' FURNISHINGS.
liOEB, MARCUS
(Hills bloek, Iemon street.
ZACH ARIAS, A
No U Lemon street.
CONFECTIONERY.
BECKS. J F .
Lemon street, corner of Second
CROCKERY.
IjTNA, A , ' . .
Hi;kman-Kenner!y block. Lemon street.
DENTAL ROOMS.
EHTES, WW
Morairne block. Lemon street, upstairs.
ROSENHEIM, UK W H .'
Hickman block Iraon street, upstairs.
DRY G0005.
TJEVEREUX. C F
Icmon street
JAOH1SON. I
Puumix block Lemon street
GRAIN. HAY, ETC.
Foot of Laurel street, near JTtKWBT
GROCERS.
DUNN, JOHN T
Next to post office. Front street
HAflAN.JW
14-moii Htreet, corner of Jones
HAIGHTON & 11ROS.. A M
IMxpiiix block. Lemon street
IftST.AV . .
I'a'- s block, foot of Lemon street
PFTF.IIM ANN, HEN IS
Lemon utrt-et. southeast corner of First
tOOI'.KO MITNDKK ,
Hii'kniun-Kennerly block. Lemon street
8HK1.LKV. J 11
Opposite Southern Express Company
GUN & LOCKSMITHS.
HENDRICKSON. L
liemou street, opposite Tutnara House
HARDWARE.
GRIFFIN PARKER
Floriilu Southern building. Water street
LANK.KT
Hurl's block. Water street
HARNESS AND SADDLES.
SANTERSON, H C '
OpiKwite Putuum House, Lemon street
HOTELS.
A r anova. rop, cor item nun rveonu sib
IKLKTON HOUSE. Arvlrew Shelley, prop,
CAI
Court House Mock, orange street
tiivrKl. PIKKMX
John Htxler. prop, r-or Lemon and Water
HAItATOliA IIIITKL. Mui. A 8 Wimhhiirn,
proprietor. Fnmt street eorner of WilliHtn
THE ARLINGTON, cor. Lemon ami Second.
f n. 1. h'li u. lroiirllr.rtMH.
fumiliiis,eorof!l)otltreand Emmett streets
ICE.
PAT.ATKA TPE FACTORY. L C Canova,
luaimtfer, Laurel st, let River and Emmett
INSURANCE.
rABiPi'fiV ICKWXF.KLY
Room!!, Keiinerly-Hitrkraan blk. Lemon st
ill I 1 .1 A It It t 'I 1 . ('HAS M
Palatka National Buk building. Front st
WEHIL W J
Post office building
JEWELRY.
HE TH OK
imon Httwt, opjKisite Putnam House
SPECK. JOHN F
Front street, four doors south of Lemon
JOB PRINTING.
PA LATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY
Keid street
LIVERY STABLES.
CEf CITY LIVERY ANT) SALE STABLE
Ninr J T & K VV depot. Fire street t
MKitWIN 4 SON m , , 4U
1,1-mon street, between Third and Fourth
RAMSAUF.lt, J M
Corner of Keid and Peeon street
LIME.
EATON, CH AS V Aoknt
Foot of Lnurel street
LUMBER.
BOYT. T A ,
Itiver street, next to Gas Works
MEAT MARKETS.
CROSS, W n
Munsirer Gem City market. Water street
CUMMINUS&CO
Umiioii street, two doors west of Jones
GOOOSON & CO., M C
No 9 Front street
MURRAY. THOMAS
Ivriuoii street, between Third and Fourth
MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS.
nOI.RROOK. MRS THOS
Front street, opposite Putnam House
PAINTS. OILS AND ARTISTS' MATERIALS
HAHNKS. H
' 1'iiluika National Bank building Front st
PHOTOGRAPHERS
MANGOLD, J O
Keuuerlv-Ilickman bloek. Lemon street
PHYSICIANS,
tJOI.E, T)H A L, HOMBOPATBIST,
ItMiira block. Iaiuiou street
CVHUS.Ur W H '
Moragtte block. Lemon street, upstairs
REAL ESTATE
SCRT, JAMES
Town lot, Palatka Heights.
HEAl.Y & TRIAY . . 4
li.iPil of Trade Room, Front street
STAKKiiltn. (i It
PulntkiA National Bank building. Front st
SALOONS.
EDWARDS. A N CO.,
"' Hnrt:s lH'k. "R aUff street
IDAHO 8A LOON
Twlr Valmettoea, Lemon street
Lemun street, near J T K W ju action
SASH. DOORS AND BLINDS
BARNES, n
falatka National Bank building. Front st
. TAILORING.
FINNINGER. i:
Oyer Locb'K sure. Lemon street, upstairs
TAXIDERMIST,
nir. w a
Front street, three doors south of Lemon
UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALMERS.
MOW, W C
No 30 Front street
WAGON FACTORY.
ACK ft MARTIN
Hi ver street, near Gas Works
W000 YARD
DALTON. M H
Foot f Adiiias streat.
FROM EUROPE.
PEACE ILLUSIONS PASSED AWAY.
NOTHING REALLY PACIFIC
IN
BISMARCK'S SPEECH.
The Alternative of Peace or War with
The Czar.
Mobilization Scheme In Knsland The
German Crown Prince's Condi
tion liliirit's Suit for lamaeft.
(Copyright, 1888, by the N. Y. Associated Press.)
Bkrlin, February 11. The peace illu
sion with which JiiBmarck s speech in
vested the situation has passed away. It
is beginning to be realized that there
was nothing really pacific in the speech
beyond leaving the Czar the alternative
of peace or war, while pointing out the
road along which Russia can retreat if
the Czar feels himself safe in retreating.
BISMARCK'S SPEECH.
St.- Petersburg advices published in
to-night's National Zeitung assert that
the Czar eulogizes within his cwn circle
Bismarck's remarks, but that the Rus
sian official opinion holds that the
Chancellor's words and diplomacy are
irreconcilable.
THE AUSTRO-GERMAN LEAGUE OFFENSIVE.
The Austro-Gernian league of peace
continues to be. in the eyes of the Czar's
advisers, an offensive alliance against
Russia, requiring unabated preparations
for inevitable war, and an alliance to
counterpoise the league.
If the official press of Berlin were per
mitted to give a frank utterance of its
opinion on the situation it would be
found te concur in Russia's conviction.
The North German Gazette goes into the
subject at length. It says the conflict
still exists, and ia undiminished in in
tensity although Bismarck's sj)eech re
lieved the minds of the people from the
fear of an immediate conflict. This is
only partially correct, for while the pub
lic are somewhat reassured regarding
the imminence of war official and diplo
matic circles are not. The sincerity of
the Czar's desire for peace is not doubted,
and though his professions are not sus
pected, it is known that the influences
around him, which he appears to be una
ble to resist, continue to work in the
direction of war.
His present position recalls an incident
that occurred on the eve of the Russo
Turkish conflict in 1877. In the archives
of the Foreign Office at Vienna there
exists a dispatch from General Langenau,
then Austrian minister to Russia, to
Count Andrassy, dated April 16, 1877,
stating that on the previous night the
Czar in the course of a long conversa
tion directed him to report to the Aus
trian Government that he entertained no
idea of war, and that he did not wish
nor intend to attack Turkey. Within a
week after this declaration Russia
opened the campaign, crossed the Pruth
and invaded Armenia.
THE CZAR GUIDED BY SINOVIEFF.
The present Czar has even less contrt
of affai.'s than his father had. lie is now
guided largely by the advice of Sinovieff,
director of the Asiatic Department of the
Foreign Office. Sinovieff is a prominent
Pan Slavist, an old friend of the late
Katkoff, and an inheritor of Katkoffs
ideas. Subjected through personal influ
ence to the war tendency of the majority
of the Council of'the Empire and to the
anti-German policy of the majority of
the ministry, it is impossible for the
Czar to entrace his steps, which are
leading to a collision with the allied
powers. Nor do the Berlin and Vienna
Governments expect him to do so,
despite their ostentatious efforts toward
conciliation.
Preparing for Mobilization.
London, February 11. The British
War Office has issued an order directing
that a statement be prepared at each
military center detailing the facilities
for summoning reserves and strengthen
ing battalions from depots within forty-
eight hours, in event of the mobilization
of the army becoming necessary. The
order is a precautionary step to enable
the new mobilization scheme to work
well if it should be necessary to put it
in force.
Doing as Weil as Could be Expected.
San Remo, February 11. The Crown
Prince of Germany is doing quite as well
as can lie expected, after undergoing the
operation of tracheotomy,
Blunt's Action for Damages,
Dcblin, February 11. The trial of the
action of Wilfred Blunt, who was re
cently convicted of violating the Crimes I
act, against the police for $2,50u dam- j
ages for illegal arrest, was commenced I
in this city to-day. Blunt was present
in the court room wearing the prison
garb under his overcoat. Lady Blunt
was also present. The court room was
crowded.
Pvne In Watertord Jail.
Dublin. February 11. Jasper Doug
lass Pyne, who was arrested n Lundon
yesterday outside the House of Com
mons, was brought tq Ireland to-day
and lodged in Waterford jail, where he
will remain till the convening of the
Kilmactbomas sessions, lUul was re-
fusetl for him. '
Gilhooly Started tor Dublin.
London, February 11. Gilhooly, tho
member of Parliament vrna waa arrested
la$t evening, left for Dublin, in company
with his guards this morning. There
was no demonstration. A he only per
sons at the ptaticn to see them off be-
tided a few reporters, were Clancy,
member -f Parliament, and two detec
tives. .
Loss of Lit by Avalanches.
Vienna, February 11. Enormous ava-
lanvSes along the line of the Arbprg
Railway have resuUl in serious loss of
life, and traffic on the road has been
stopped. " -
ASSISTANT TREASURER.
Judge McCue hat Consented to Accept the P
tUton at New York.
Wasfington, February 11. Judge
Alexander McCue, of Brooklyn, N. Y.,
who at present holds the office of Solici
tor of the Treasury, has been offered and
accepted the posUion of Assistant Treas
urer at New York, vice Mr. Canday, re
signed. Mr. McCue did not seek the of
fice and accepted it only upon the solici
tation of the President. It was offered
to him about three weeks ago and de
clined. It was then tendered to several
other persons, but each of them de
clined on account of the vast
responsibility of the office. Early this
week the President again urged Mr. Mc
Cue to accept the office, and after think
ing it over for several days he concluded
to do so. lie called on the President this
morning and informed him of his con
clusion, adding that while the duties of
the office were somewhat strange to him
at present, he would undertake to per
form them so as to reflect no discredit
on the President or himself. It ia ex
pected that his nomination as Assistant
Treasurer will be sent to the Senate
Monday. '
BUCKET SHOPS RAIDED.
Can They be Kept Open A Test Case io be De
cided Next Week.
New York, February 11. A general
raid was made to-day on all bucket
shops in New street, Broad street and
lower Broadway. Among those raided
by the police are Lumpkin & Co., 51
New street; Stockton & Co., 56 New
street; Hart & Co., 57 New street; Man
hattan Stock Company, 61 New street,
and Standard Stock Company, 33 New
street. The proprietors or men con
ducting business were taken off under
arrest. It is generally believed that they
will all resume business Monday as
usual, ine htanaard btocK Uompany
and Hart & Co. have an old indictment
hanging over them for keeping a gam
bling house, and their trials are set down
for next week, and will be regarded as
test cases.
In the event of conviction, it is under
stood that all the bucket shops will
change their present mode and do busi
ness under the system now in operation
by Todd & Co., fstyled "open board of
brokers."
Thirty-eight men in all were captured
in the raid on the bucket shops to-day.
The charge against them is maintaining
gambling houses in violation of section
343 of the Penal Code. The arrests were
made on complaints being sent to the
police by prominent stock brokers in Wall
street and the Stock Exchange, who
retained Delancy Nicoll to prosecute the
charge. Inspector Byrnes furnished a
detective to make the arrests and Judge
White issued the warrants. Late in the
afternoon they were all bailed in f 500.
Judge O'Reilly having beerr summoned
to open court at police headquarters two
young men, who were hired by the reg
ular brokers to procure evidence against
the bucket shop proprietors, will appear
at the trial as well as several victims of
the alleged gambling dens. One of the
latter is said to be a graduate of Prince
ton College, who has spent f 00,000 in
these shops. Another willing witness is
a man who has lost $10,000 in the same
manner. .
THE UNION PACIFIC.
President Adams Before the House Committee on
Pacific Railroads.
Washington, February 11. Charles
Francis Adams, president of the Union
Pacific Railway Company, appeared be
fore the House Committee on Pacific
Railroals to-day and explained the at
titude of that company towards the fund
ing bills pending before the committee.
Generally he favored the Outhwaite bill
with but a few slight amendments, in
tended to relieve the most striking
features.
Mr. Adams spoke an hour and a half.
He began his statement with a reminder
to the committee that he had appeared
at its invitation, and said that he did
not come to make any extended re
marks for the reason that he had- made
a statement to the committee two years
ago, which in its essential features he
had seen no occasion to revise. Mean
while the business had become two years
older and was a matter of which not
only the country, but Congress and the
press, had become somewhat weary. "It
is an old story, gone over ad nauseam,
said Adams. He did not intend to go
over it again, but would simply refer
the committee to the enormous record
which exists and which has been in
creased by six or seven volumes of re
ports of investigating commissions. He
proposed to pass that over as sufficiently
investigated and come directly down to
the point where the commission had left
the business. It had left it in the shape
of a report and accompanying bills.
Cotton Movement Since September I.
New York, February 11. The cotton
movement for the week and since Sep
tember 1, with comparison with the
same periods last year, according to re
turns to the Jovrnal of Commerce to
February 10, were as follows: Receipts
at interior towns, 46,391 bales; against
56,675 last year ; shipments, 59,546;
against 62,377 last year; stocks re
maining were 393,695 ; coniimred
with 345,820 th name time in
receipts at ports, 99,618
for the week, against 117,805 the same
week hist year; deliveries, from plan
tations, 813,663, against 10,186 last year,
and totul deliveries from plantations
since September 1 amounting to 5,031,-
151, against 4,864,031 for the same time
last year, or an increase of 173,120, and
the total crop in sight to February 10
amounting to 6,104,564, against 5,"02,-
86S the same time kst year, an increase
of 401,696 bales.
Thrown Into the Courts.
Chattanoooa, February 11. The
Commercial Printing Company, publish
ers of the DaUy and Weekly Commercial x
which made an assignment Thursday,
has been thrown into the courts by disa
greeing stockhoder&nd the publication
of the newspaper has been suspended,
COOK COUNTY MUST PAY.
Decisioa by Judge Tuthill in Favor e! the Chicago
Industrial School.
Chicago. February 11. Judge Rich
ard Tuthill in the Circuit Court of
Chicago to-day rendered a decision in
the case of the incorporators of the
Chicago Industrial School. The incor
porators are all Roman Catholics, and
temporarily, until they secure a building
of their own, they contracted with the
Sisters of the Good Shepherd to house
and teach the girls committed. -There
are other industrial schools in the State,
the incorporators of which are Protestr
ants. By law the county has to pay for
the support of such girls. The county
-esisted payment on the ground that it
would be a payment of public money for
sectarian purposes. Judge Tuthill, in
an able opinion, decided that the pur
pose was not sectarian and ordered the
county to pay the full amount, 10,583.
THE SIX DAYS WALK.
Albert Breaks the Record by Making 62 1 Miles by
10 o'clock Last Night.
New York, February 11. The six-
days walking match ended to-night
without any of the usual scenes of dis
order and rowdyism that have prevailed
on previous occasions. Albert - has
broken the record and is now the cham
pion of the world. Eisrht of the compet
itors completed the 525 miles that enti
tled them to a share in the gate receipts.
The score of these eight at 10 o'clock was
as follows: Albert, C21 miles, 4 laps;
Herty, 583 miles; Guerero, 56-1 miles;
Hart, 540; Golden,. 538; Moore, 531;
Strokel, 526; Noremac, 525.
Mrs. Robinson Found Guilty of Murder.
Boston, February 11. The jury in
the case of Mrs. Sarah J. Robinson, the
alleged wholesale poisoner, this morning
rendered a verdict of guilty of murder
in the first degree. In this trial she was
charged with the murder of Prince Ar
thur Freeman, her nephew. Mrs. Robin
son had previously been tried on the
charge of killing her son and daughter,
but the jury disagreed. The incentive
to all the crimes with which she is
charged was alleged to lie the securing
of the life insurance of her victims.
Suit for $50,000 Damages.
Chicago, February 11. Andrew J.
Carberry, the Pullman Car conductor
who was tried in the Criminal Court last
week and acquitted of the charge of
stealing the company's fares on his run
between New Orleans and Chicago,
brought suits for f 50,000 damages to-day
in the Circuit Court against the Pullman
Car Company and American ' Surety
Company, his prosecutors.
Negro Woman Poisons Herself and Children.
Macon, Ga., February 11. Ruth
Woodall, a negro woman living in Jones
County, alxut ten miles from here,
mixed some rough on rats with water
and made her two daughters, aged seven
and five respectively, drink of it. She
then drank what was left. The mother
and eldest daughter died, but the other
child was saved bv a physician. No
cause was assigned.
The Freight War.
Kansas City, February 11. A re-
newel of the reduction in freight rates
occurred yesterday. The Kansas City,
Fort Scott and Gulf Road made the fol
lowing rates on packing house products:
To Galveston and Houston forty cents;
to Memphis,' 14; to Memphis, when des
tined for Green Line points, 12; to New
Orleans, Mobile and Vicksburg, 24;
sugar from New Orleans to Kansas City,
7. The Santa Fe joined in the above
rates to Texas.
Virginia Compulsory Pilotage BUI.
Richmond, Va., February 11. The
Assembly not being in session to-day
there was no action on the bill provid
ing for the abolishment of compulsory
pilotage on coastwise vessels. The Com
mittee on Commerce yesterday agreed
on a favorable report by a vote of five to
four, and the bill will be so reported to
the House on Monday.
Liquor and Cigar Dealer Fails.
xuCHMOND, VA., February 11. tleorge
A. Lathrop &Co., wholesale dealers in
liquors and cigars, to-day filled a deed in
the Chancery Court, making an assign
ment to James Blythe Moore. Liabilities
$82,000, assets not yet known. The first
preferred creditor is S. P. Lathrop,
father of the senior member of the firm,
who is indorser for about $40,000.
Another Requisition on Gov. Buckner.
Charleston, W. Va., February 11.
uovernor uson to-day issued a re
quisition on Governor Buckner, of Ken
tucky, for the twenty-eight men who
are charged with having participated in
the killing of Wm. Derousey in Logan
County, in this State on the 10th of last
month in a fight between the Hatfit-lds
and McCoys.
Chicago and the Democratic Convention.
Chicago, February 11. At a meeting
of the Local Finance Committee to-dav
the chairman said that $23,000 had been
subscribed by Chicago citizens to defray
the expenses of the Democratic National
Convention, provided it came to Chica
go, and the sum will be increased to
$50,000 if necessarv. A working com
mittee decided to go to Washington
next Saturdav.
Demand 15 Per Cent. Ad a ice in Wages.
Scranton, Pa February 11. A
formal demand for 15 per cent, advance
in miners' wages has been made by the
executive board of District Assembly
No. 16, Knisrht of Labor, and forwarded
by M. T. Burke, the Carbondale member
of the board, to all operators in the
Lackawana and Wyoming "alleys.
A Farmer Suicides. -Norfolk,
Ya., February 11. W. T.
Everett, a prominent farmer of Nanse-
mond County, suicided this morning at
his home. Loss of sleep from nursing
ck children and overwork unbalanced
his mind. . -
Ass!(rtmnt ia Montgomery.
Montgomery, February 11. A. Behr,
surviving partner of A. Behr & Bro.,
made an assignment to-day. Liabilities
scheduled at $'25,000; assets nominally
the same. S. Behr suicided some weeks
ago. - " -
SPECIAL NEWS.
TEE GREAT RACE AT PUNTA GORDA
DESCRIPTION OF IT BY OUR OWN
CORRESPONDENT.
Items from Other Place The
Rnmh for
Florida Alsatians Arrive to
Make
This State Their Future Home. -
Special fo the PaUitka Ants.
Pcnta Gorda, February 11. The sec
ond race of five miles, between Teemer,
McKay and Haoim, the champion oars
men, took place here to-day. High wind
and rough water prevented an early
start, and they did not get off until 1 5
o'clock. Teemer turned his" outer flag
at 1:13:20, McKay ten seconds later.
Hamm sixteen seconds later. Teemer
turned his outer flatr the second time at
35:15, McKay twenty seconds later.
Hamm8 shell having become water log
ged lie withdrew. Teemer passed the
home flag at 1:46:46, McKay four seconds
later. Teemer rowed the five miles in
forty-one minutes and forty-six seconds,
McKay forty-one minutes and fifty sec
onds.
The M owing goes to the United and
the Associated Press to-night;
"Messrs. Teemer, McKay and Hamm
will row over the Lake Weir Chautau
qua course, on i ebruary 23, a five mile
race for $500 and . the championship of
America, and a one mile dash on Febru
ary 29, for the championship of America
and Chautuaoua cold medal. Entries
to either of the above races are open
until February 25. 1888, and will be re
ceived by O. W. Bromwell, at Palatka,
Fla., up to and including that date.
'The one mi'e dash is intended to es
tablish a record and Messrs. Teenier,
McKay and Hamm have decided to
make the conest at Lake Weir, Fla.
"The oarsmen leave here for Palatka
to-morrow. Tbev row on the St. Johns
River at that place the coming week.
Their boats weigh twenty-eiht pounds
each, are thirty-one feet long and eleven
inches wide in the widest place."
O. W. B.
FROM WASHINGTON.
st.
Clair-Abramt in the City The Rush for Florida
Booming.
Special tn the Palatka New.
Washington, February 11. J. E.
Alexander, or rlorida, has been ap
pointed post office inspector at $1,600.
Major Alex. St. Clair-Abrams, of Or
lando, is in the city.
The rush for Florida is on the boom.
The vestibule train, which leaves New
York tri-weekly, has every seat engaged
up to the 1st of March. X.
Alsatian Immigrants-
Special fo the ralatlsa Xevat.
Jacksonville, February 11. Thirty-
five Alsatians arrived via the steamer
Yumesser to-day, en route for Quincy,
where they go to locate. They are from
the district where Mr. Storm, the
pioneer of the recent tobacco raising
boom, was reared, and came on his ad
vice. This is the first installment of
what promises to be a big immigration
from Alsace to Gadsden County. W.
FROM JACKSONVILLE.
In Mayor's Court The Congregational Council
-Va-
rious Other Matters. '
Special tn the Palatka A'ewx.
Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. 11
In the Mayor's court this morning the
cases disposed of were as follows
Ella Williams, Victoria Clark and
Mary Allen, three mulatto women,
charged with quarrelling and disturbing
the public peace. The two first were
fined $10 each, or go to jail for ten days,
the latter $5 only. She had only $3, and
the balance was remitted. The other
two paid $10 each.
John Stephens, a darkey, was fined $2
for abusive language, the payment to
stand suspended during good behavior.
Sammy Frazier, a little colored boot
black, was caught stealing the morning
papers from Farwell's furniture store
and fined $1.
This morning the
Council met at Ord's
Jacksonville, for the
amining the Rev. F. P.
Congregational
Hall, in South
purpose of ex-
, Bacheller, with
a view to bis ordination and installation
as pastor of the church at Philips. The
council hold a session this afternoon in
the church in this city for the same pur
pose in reference to Rev. R. T. Hall's
pastorate.
Marshal w. U. i'.ircl and. his son-in-
law, O. B. Burroughs, left this afternoon
for Albany, N. Y., in charge of two col
ored men, John Crawley and Frank
Taylor, convicted in the United States
Court last month, one for robbing the
Arredonda post office, and the other for
intercepting a letter at the Jacksonville
office addressed to another person, and
stealing therefrom $10. They go to the
Albany, N. Y., penitentiary.
Only four deaths were recorded at the
city sexton's office up to 2 p. m. to-day
as occurring in the city last week three
whites and one colored.
Noah Commody, colored, was ar
rested this afternoon upon a warrant is
sued by Justice Magill for whipping his
wife.
Col. K. M. Johnston, managing
editor of the Houston, Texas Post, is in
the city to-day.
Mrs. Ransom, a prominent New York
society leader, has elegant apartments
at the Clenada Hotel.
R. H. Liggitt and A. W. Barrs, of
this city, have been commissioned by
Gov. Perry as notaries public J. E. S.
Baa Weather in Lrnchbnrg.
Lynchburg, Va., February 11. The
weather is terrible to-day, with a heavy
storm of sleet and snow. Owing to the
situation of the city business is. almost
paralyzed, it being impossible to get ve
hicles up and down the bills.
OUR WASHINGTON LETTER.
Tne
Coma Embassy Tarlt Leoififcatloa Demo
cratic Congressional Committee.
Washington, D. C, February 8.
The Coresui embassy, when taking an
airing and at the same time admiring
the beauties of the Capital City, excite
no little curiobity. It may be said they
are lacking in all that goes to make up
beauty, and wabble about in the streets,
followed by a crowd of youngsters and
eyed by every passer-by. In dress they
take after the Chinese, and are gorge
ously attired when robed in their Sunday
go-to-meeting clothes.
They wear a coat that reaches very
near the knee, giving a glimpse of the
zouave trousers, made of the richest ma
terial, and sandaled feet. The most cu
rious part of their dress is found in the
head gear. It is by this means that rank
is designated. The hats, if such indeed
they can be called, are made of horse
hair, and while they are made in various
fashions it cannot be said that they are
not cool. Indeed it is a great wonder
how they can be free from colds
and catarrh with so little protection given
their heads.
It will be remembered that this em
bassy was sent from Corea to establish,
practically, the independence of that
country and to cultivate more friendly
relations with this country. China has
held Corea under control and denied her
the privilege of sending ministers abroad.
Not heeding this rather peremptory or
der, Corea has assigned ambassadors to
nearly every country in the hope of
more fully cementing her independence.
As soon as China heard of the pro
posed action she Bent an armament to
restrain Corea' s power and to keep the
appointed ministers at home, but too
late, for on the arrival of the Gunboats
at Corea, the embassies were many
leagues frou. native shore proceed
ing to their respective destinations.
What will be the result of this action
on the iart of Corea cannot be stated,
but suffice it to say that tlie delegation
which has been sent to this city is the
observed of all the observed, and I am
rather inclined to believe that thev
rather like the degree of curiosity their
appearance on the streets causes, and
they always travel on foot when doing
the city.
the tariff.
The tariff question still hangs in the
balance. Every day we hear that it will
be reported to the House in a few days.
But the truth of the matter seems to lie
that a bill of that character lias yet to
be framed by the Ways and Means Com
mittee. It is said that it will be a mat
ter of only a few hours to draft a bill
that will be reported by the majority,
and during the meantime evangelistic
tactics are resorted to by Mr. Mills and
his followers, so as to the more firmly
cement the Democratic bonds on the
great question.
democratic congressional committee.
The House to-day ajourned earlier
than usual to allow the Democratic
memliers to caucus, as requested
by caucus Chairman Cox. The result
of the meeting was the appointment of
a Democratic Congressional Campaign
Committee.
This is merely a form that is gone
through every year and many of the
men who have been named are hardly
known outside of the district they rep
resent.
Again one sees there the names of
those who will very probably have
rather a hard time getting back into the
legislative councils of the nation.
Mr. Davidson for one, promised when
before the Brooksville convention last
year that if nominated then he would
step down and out w ith all possible
grace, not in those words, but practic
ally to that effect. He is named as a
member of the Congressional Commit
tee. Does it mean tht he will again
appear before the convention and ask
the First District for a seventh pass to
Washington? This is meant as a cue for
those whose ambition lies in this direc
tion and who would not only do credit
to themselves but represent the district
as Mr. Davidson has done in an honor
able and effective manner. X.
WASHINGTON BEFORE LENT.
A Gay Season Twisting tha Lion's Tail The
Senate's "Bad Boy."
Correxpontlcncc of th Palatka New.
Washington, D. C, February 9.
The near approach of the Lenten sea
son wains society. that restivity must
soon cease for a period. It must be said
that there are but few of the number
who do not celebrate this season of
prayer and fasting in its proper light.
During this and Monday and Tuesday
of next week gaiety will be indulged in
to the greatest extent. Balls, socials,
teas, swell receptions, opera parties and
all its sort of thing will be played with
a high hand during the remaining days.
At the White House the public recep
tions will be continued, but the great
social events of the season have already
been passed and an exceedingly pleasant
winter it has been.
The balance of the world will shun the
pleasures of the social whirl and clad in
sackcloth and besmirched with ashes
atone for the many little sins which have
been recorded on the debit side of the
account which is run daily by the Guar
dian Angels.
Lent has always been observed, and
this year will prove no exception.
THE TREATY WITH GREAT BRITAIN.
Well, after many vain attempts to
consider resolutions requiring the con
sideration of the treat r between Great
Britain and this country, Mr. Riddle-
berger has the honor of having gained
his point to a certain degree, the Senate
in executive session having postponed
consideration of the treaty until next
December.
When the resolutions were reported
this morning Kiddleberger said that
inasmuch as the British lion's tail had
been sufficiently twisted by a vote of
21 to 23, which is presumed to be the
vote by which its consideration was
postponed it was now unnecessary to
go into the matter any further.
He proceeded to make a few remarks.
although suffering from severe bron
chial troubles, but was interrupted by
Senator Hawley, who, supposing that
the Virginian would soon proceed to
violate the rules of the Senate, raised
the point of order, and was sustained by
tl) Chair.
Nothing daunted the reek's Bad Boy
of the Senate asked to make an explana
tion and turning towards Uawley and
raising his voice to its highest and most
eloquent pitch at the same time assum
ing a pugilistic attitude declared "that
he did not propose to be called to order
at all times, in all places and by any per
son whatsoever," and he wanted it dis
tinctly understood. Ha v ing said all that
he desired to say he quietly resumed his
seat.
THE SECRET SESSION.
What will be Riddleberger's next
move? The press gallery will anxiously
await its advent. But I would suggest
that as he has, in a degree, been so suc
cessful in this move, that he now attack
the secret session folly as a whole.
There may be certain cases when an
executive session would bo politic, but
taken altogether there does not exist a
greater piece of humbuggery than the
so-called secret session.
Let it be forever abolished. The people
send representatives to Gtmgress to legis
late for their benefit in open session, and
not to hide their every action behind a
rule which, apparently, is made to screen
them from the criticism of the public
It belongs entirely to an age that has
passed, and is certainly undignified and
inexcusable in the Senate of the United
States.
ATTACK ON TELEGRAPHIC FACILITIES.
The first public act of Speaker Carlisle
since his return to the Capitol has been
his order removing all telegraph wires
and offices from the corridors of the
House. It is said that these wires were
used exclusively by lobbyists and were
therefore removed.
A "kick" being made, all growlers
were warned to go slow, or an order
would be issued removing all wires from
that side of the CapitoL
This wtyild mean that members of the
press gallery would denied the privi
leges f rapid transit for the!.' specials.
and would likewise mean that such -2
howl would arise from that quarter that
legislators would awaken to the fact that
the press is the medium of the eople
and its representatives are entithnl to
distinguished consideration. X.
ADDITIONAL LOCAL.
FRY'S 0PEEA HOUSE.
Prof Lowanda's Gift Show Gives Its Last
Entertainment.
Prof. Lowanda's monster gift show
was greeted last evening with an au
dience fully equal to that in attendance
the night before. From the time the
curtain was raised the assemblage of
people were either kept continuously
laughing at the comical antics of differ
ent memliers of the troupe, or were held
spell-bound to their chairs in "open-
mouth wonder" at the wonders of Prof.
Lowanda in his slight-of-hand tricks
and manuvers in spiritualism. Madam
Lowanda as a mind reader, was put to a
thorough and fair test and in the end
Droved to be as claimed. The
system of distributing presents
adopted by this company is as fair as
could be desired every one having an
equal chance. As promised a gold
watch, a silver pitcher and a silver cake
stand were given away among those
present in addition to many other
valuable presents. The three main ar
ticles above mentioned were won by the
following: Gold watch, check 68, Miss
Clara Bland; elegant silver pitcher.
check 45, Mr. W. B. Hough; nice silver
cake stand, check 13B, W. J. Singleton,
colored porter. Although advertised to
Ierform three nights, the Professor was
unable to obtain the opera house longer
than two evenings on account of other
engagements, hence this is their last ex
hibition.
THE '"BRIDAL TRAP.''
Miss Randall and Her Company in the
Unarming Opera Matinee To-day.
News-Herald.
Miss Adelaide Randall and her com
pany played Rosenfitld's French Opera,
"The Bridal Trap," to a fair and appre
ciative audience at the Opera House last
evening. Miss Randall, as Rosette, ap
peared to good advantage. liar fascin
ating acting and pleasing voice capti
vated the house. In the first act she
sang very sweetly the popular song from
the "Little Tycoon," Love Comes Like
a Summer Sigh. .
Herman Waldo, as the Comte, and
Charles F. Lang, as Gravolin, sang well.
Both have good tenor voices. Miss Ger
tie Hoyt made a charming Marquis, and
in her song in the second act elicited
warm applause. Mr. James O. Peakes
is Juiore of a comedian than a singer,
and in the part of Foutelard he has very
little need of bis voice.
The support throughout was good and
the company by far is the best that has
visited Jacksonville this season.
Churches To-Day.
Episcopal, Rev. C. S. Williams, pastor.
Services 1050 a. m. and 750 p. m
Sunday School. 350 p. in.
Presbyterian, Rev. L. II. Wilson, j-as-
tor Services, 1050 a. m. and . 50 p. m.
Sunday School, 3 p. tn. Prayer meet
ing, 7 p. m. Wednesdays.
At the Methodist, the Presidine Elder
will preach in the morning. Class meet
ing from 950 to 1050 a. m. Morning
services 1050 a. m., and evening ser
vices 7 p. ni. Sunday school at 3 p. m.
Prayer meeting will be held at 750
o'clock Wednesday evening.
Rev. J. H. Johnson, of Boston, will
preach in the First Baptist Church this
morning. Services at 11 a. in. and 7 30
p. m. Sunday school at 10 a. m. Prayer
meeting will be held every Thursday
e veni ng at 7 50 o'clock.
Catholic. Rev. Father Wafch The
usual Sabltath services.
St. Philip's P. E. Mission, colored, Rev.
E. Butler, pastor Services at 11 a. ra.
and 7 p.m.
Weather Indications
Eastern Florida Local rain, followed
by fair weather and tlightly warmer.
Western Florida Fair weather, flight
changes in temperature, light variable
winds, generally northwegterty.
BONDS.
THE MORTGAGE TO EASE THEM OK.
Tha Instrument Filed by the Oeorsle,
Soothers, end Florida In F-tUnaae
nd Other Counties.
Tha mortgage filed at the Court House
day before yesterday by the Georgia .
Southern and Florida Railroad Company
recites that whereas, by an act of the
Legislature of Georgia approved Septem
ber 21, 1SS7, the Georgia Southern and
Florida Railroad Company was author
ized and empowered to consolidate with
that road any railroad company in the
State of Florida, and the Macon and
Florida Air Line Railroad Company hav
ing similar powers from the Legislature
of Flwida, had by an unanimous vote
of the stockholders at a meet
ing held December 81, 1SS7, re
solved to consolidate with the said
Georgia Southern and Florida and the
stockholders of the latter company had
accepted the proposal at a meeting held
January 3, 1888, the indenture made
January 3, 1S83, between the said Geor
gia Southern and Florida Railroad Com
pany, party of the first part, and Isador
Straus and Henry Rice, trustees, of the
city and State cf New York, parties of
the second part, "witnesseth that
whereas the said railroad company, the
party of the first part, owns and operates
or is about to own and operate a railroad
for the transportation of passengers and
freight, commencing at the said city of
Macon and extending to the city
of Palatka, a distance of 2J0
miles, more or less, and whereas at a
meeting of the Board f Directors of the
said Georgia. -Southern and-Florida Rail
road company held at the city of M3crJu7
State of Georgia, on the 3rd of January,
1888, certain resolutions were adopted
for the consideration of the stockholders
which said resolutions were thereafter
submitted to the stockholders of the
Georgia Southern and Florida Railroad
Company at a meeting held in accord
ance with law in the said city of Macon
on the 3rd of January, 1888, and said
resolutions were unanimously adopted
by said stockholders in form as follows:
"Resolrrd, By the stockholders of the
Georgia Southern and Florida Railroad -Company
in convention assembled for
that purpose all of the capital stock of
the aforesaid company voting for this
resolution that
Whereas, The President and Direc
tors of this corporation have had pre
pared in the name of this conjuration a
series of coupon bonds of the denomina
tion of $ 1,000 each which bonds bear
date the 1st of July, 1887, and are to fall
due on the 1st day of July, 1927, and are
to bear interest at the rate of 6 per cent,
per annum, payable semi-annually,
principal and interest, payable in gold
coin of the present weight and fineness,
said bonds being pavable to 1-iador Straus
and Henry Rice as Trustees or bearer.
"That this action of the President and
Directors of this corporation in having
the said bonds prepared in the manner
and form as hereintofore set forth be
and the same is hereby ratified and con
firmed, and the said President and
Board of Directors of this company are
hereby required to have said bonds
signed by the President and Treasurer
of this cor oration and issue the said
bonds in Jseries not exceeding $12,000
per mile of actually constructed road
and branches thareof from Macon to Pa
latka. -s
"And in order to secure the faithful
payment of said bonds and coupons to .
le hohlers thereof, the said officers are
.rther authorized, empowered and in
structed to cause to be executed and de
livered in the name of this company, a
mortgage or deed of trust, which shall .
convey all the property of the corpora
tion, consisting of roaubed and appur
tenances and each and every one of its
units, privileges and purchases, embrac
ing its subsequently acquired as well as
its present property, real, personal ana
mixed, in possession and in expectancy
to two or more responsible parties, or a
responsible company who shall have and
hold all of the said property in trunt for
the purposes aforesaid, and the Eaid offi
cers are hereby invested."
It is not necessary to follow this legal
document, which of course is one of
great length, any farther. It includes
the form of the bonds and coupons, con
ditions of the mortgage, etc., and the
certificates cf the officers of various
counties certifying that it had been filed
in accordance with law.
The Last Night at the Fair.
Last evening terminated the fair for
the Sisters of St. Joseph. A few articles
were raffled and others auctioned. The
fair has received its full share of patron
age, considering the many amusements
during the week that only served to
draw away those who otherwise would
have been present to Jake part in this
good work. " Nevertheless the Sisters
have done well the exact amount is
difficult to state as no estimate can be
made at this writing. Suffice it to say
that some $200 were realized, and that
this sum will be greatly inflated by the
Milkmaid's drill to-morrow evening.
Tickets for this event may be pur
chased at the apothecaries of Lowery
& Starr and R. Keating.
Hfiw England Society in Florida.
The following received at this office is
an explanation in itself:
Jacksonville, Feburary 1.
Dear Sir: You are invited to attend a
meeting of New England men living in
Florida to be held in Jacksonville on
Washington's Birthday, 1888, at the
rooms of tlie Board of Trade, at 10 o'clock
in the forenoon, for the purpos? of or
ganizing the New England Society of
Florida,
As there are many New En idanders In
Florida whose names and addresses are
unknown to us, will you kindly extend
this invitation to euch of them as you
think proper.
George r. Drew, Jacksonville: Horatio
Bisbee, Jacksonville: George W. Bent
ley, Jacksonville; Jonathan C. Greeley,
Jacksonville; Charles a. Adams. Jack
sonville; J as. K. Campbell, Jacksonville;
F. IL Orvia, Jacksonville; A. IS. Mason,
Seville; H. L. Hart, Palatka; Sherman
Conant, Palatka; Sumner C. Chandler,
Wilber J. Webb, Palatka, W. W.
Dewhurst, St. Augustine; Arthur O.
Hamlin, DeLand; Fred S. Goodrich, De
iAnd; Isaac Stone, DeLand; Joshua L.
Chamberlain, Homosassa.
V

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