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The Palatka daily news. (Palatka, Fla.) 1884-1888, March 04, 1888, Image 1

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THE FAiLAT
' B AIILY MJEWi
JLUME IV.
PAL ATKA, KLO RED A. SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 4, 188S.
NUMBER 308.
?:
CITY DIRECTORY.
APOTHECARIES. .
i ACK38RMAN STKWATT.
Houihwrirt comer Lemon and Front.
KKK-V11NO. K
Northetwt corner Lemon nd Front.
.. PKaK. P F
- - l-mon street Baum block.
VOGfa.LB.ACH, A K
C'eutnd DruK Store, Lemon street. .
" ATTORNEYS -
" BALDWIN, JOSEPH E,
(; " piotOflM Uuilrtlnjr, Palalka, Fla.
t '.- CALHOUN DAVIS,
. ; Vront stnjet, corner Reid, offices npattur.
, CHANDLEH, fit'M.NEK C
, Front st, Palatka National Bank Building-
KOHEKTS, A If
lalkb'.ock Lemon itroet; office upstair.
. . BANGOR ORANGE BOXES.
v ' EATON CP
y . T Foot of Laurel near J T K W depot.
i . BANKS.
', ' TRST NATIONAL BANK.
( W J WiDegar, President, Front street
I - BARBERS.
' FINLBT. A H
Ijrmon street, opnoaite Putnam House.
?- MOHH, FRANK
. Palk block. Lemon street.
BOARD OF TRADE.
OFPTCR, NO . 88 FRONT STREET.
Visitor In the citv wishiua information
' will be cheerfully supplied. .
B0AR0IN6 HOUSES.
MRS T (i HUTCHINSON.
- Boarding and Diulng Koom.'Waterand Main
BOOKS AND STATIONERY.
COCHRANTi, T V
Front street, next door to post of&oe
BOOTS AND SHOES. .
-VATTERLIN, H T
Kean block. Lemon street, cor. Front.
. BOOK BINDERS.
PALATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPAST
Held struct.
" BOOT AND SHOE MAKING AND REPAIRING.
I.ANfi LRV, H E .-.-,
Front st. rt door south of First Nat Bank
KODDA. BKN J, AOKNT,
Lemou street, opposite Putnam House.
CANDY MANUFACTURERS.
MITH. RE J
No 8 Lemon street, Gillis block. :
CIGARS ANO TOBACCOS.
SMITH, It AK J
No Lemon street. Gillis block.
CISTERNS AND TANKS.
TANK FACTORY,
A L JoDtxt, proprietor, Water street. Bear
' J T K W depot.
CIVIL ENGINEERING.
JOSEPH, C J
City Surveyor, Nos. 8 and Moragne block,
over Kersting's.
CLOTHING ANO GENTS FURNISHINGS.
I.OEB, MARCUS ;
(Jillis blix-lc, Lemon street, j ,
ZACHAKIAS, A ...
No Id Lemon street.
' ' CONFECTIONERY. "
BECKS. JF
Leuiou street, corner of Second
CROCKERY.
. LalTNA, A
Hickinan-Kenoor! v block. Lemon street.
DENTAL ROOMS.
ESTK8 "W W
Morairne blwk, T,emon street, upstairs.
R08KNBEHO, TR W H
Hickman block Lemon street, upstairs.
- DRY GOODS.
DEVERECX. CP "
. lit-mtm street
JACOBSON. 1
Pliojnix block Lemon street
GRAIN. HAY. ETC.
VERTREEH4CO.,
Koot of Laurel street, near J T K W RT
GROCERS.
DUNN, JOHN T
Next to post oIBce, Front street
HAOAN, JW 4
l-trnin street, corner of Jones
HAUUHTON & BROS., A M
Phoenix block. Lemon street
?nVST. A V -
Pnrt 8 block, foot of Lemon street
,tOGRU & M UNDER
Hickman-Kennerlv block. Lemon street
. iiHKI.I.KV. J H
Opposite Southern Express Company
GUN ft LOCKSMITHS. '
KENDRICKSON, L ,
. Lemon street, opposite Putnam House
HARDWARE. ,
GRIFFIN PARKER
Kloriila Southern building. Water street
LANK, ST
Hurt's block. Water street . -
HARNESS AND SADDLES
SANDERSON, RC
Oppolt Putnam House. Lemon street
HOTELS.
4.ANOVA HOUSE
A P Canova, prop, cor Reid and Second sts
CAUL KT.f HOUSE, Andrew Shelley, prop,
Unn-t HoiiHe block. Orange street
John It'ixler. prr.n, cor Lemon and Water
RjTtMi A HOTEIte Ma. A H Washburn.
propiietor. Front st-reet corner or vt llliara
"HK A IlLfNUTON, cor. liimon and Second.
Mi L. Fa l.K. Proprietress.
ice.
f.AUTKA ICE FACTORY. L C Canova,
, manager, Laurl st. Let River and Emmett
INSURANCE.
Al(T.CTON KENNERLY
ItiMiin 2, Kenni-rl v.llickman blk. Lemon st
flll.l.lARU CONCHAS M
Palatka National Bank building. Front st
sV Eltli, W J
Post oRice building
JEWELRY.
!HEATH, OB
U-moii str!et, opposite Putnam House
PECK. JOHN F
Front street, four doors south of Lemon
JOB PRINTING.
PALATKA NEWS PUBLISHING COMPANY
. Held street
LIVERY STABLES.
!EM CITY LIVERY AND SALE 8TABLK
ar J T K W depot, Flint street
KA MSA I EH, J M
- . i;orier of Iteld and 8ecou street
LIME. -BATON,
C1TA3 F, AOKNT
Foot of Iur;l street -MEAT
MARKETS.
CROSS, WB
Manager Gem City market, Water street
GOODSON MC
No 20 Front street
AICHUAY. THOMAS ,
Lemon street, between Third and Fourth
MILLINERY ANO FANCY GOODS.
: HOLBROOK. MRS TITOS
t Front street, opposite Putnam House
PHOTOGRAPHERS.
MANGOLD, J O
Kenncrlv-Hlckmau block, I.emon street
PHYSICIANS.
CYHCS. Ir WH
Moragne block. Lemon street, upstairs
REAL ESTATE.
SUNT. JAMES
Town lot. Palntka Heights.
fTEALY TKIAY
Hoard of Trade Room, Front street
STAFFORD, 1 H
Palatka National Bank building. Front st
SALOONS.
EDWARDS. AN X
Hart'a lotrk. Water street ' "
IDAHO SLMN
Twir Palmettoes, Lemon street
MCOH.UJOHN
. Lemon street, near J T k K W Junction -
TAILORING.
VIMNINGER.ua
Over LoebD store. Lemon street, upstairs
TAXIDERMIST.
ruv. W 8
. Front street, three doors south of Lemon '
UNDERTAKERS AND EMBALKERS.
No 30 Front street
WAGON FACTORY.
tACB A MARTIN
River street, near Gas Works -
THE TURF.
Nlw Orleans, March 3. The first
race, four and one-half furlonps. Big-
goyet won, Persimmons, second; Lola,
third. Time, 5?i seconds.
Second race, five-eights of a mile, Prin
cess won; Mirth, second f Dutchman,
third. Time, 1:05.
Third race, three-fourths of a mile,
- Endurer won; Walker, second; Full Sail,
third. Time, t:lSJ.
Fourth race, seven-eights of a mile,
UeJ. Leaf won; Ofullus, second; Little
Sullivan, third. Time, 1:31$.
. : In JLrnt. : ...
- ' .. . fiOfttOB IOBt. ... -
A r-t deal of repentance nowadays
' - i.i broadcloth and ashes of rosea
' f r t lrclotli and ashes, '
THE STRIKE.
GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE MEETING
LOOKED FOR WITH ANXIETY BY
BOTH SIDES.
The Reading Brotherhood Do Not
Obey Orders.
The Northern Pacific Kngluera Stand by
the Brotherhood and Pledge Them
75,000 if.Neaded.
. CniCAGO, March 3. The meeting on
Monday of the Grievance Committee of
the engineers and firemen is looked for
ward to with great anxiety by both the
Burlington officials and the Brotherhood
officers. Upon the outcome of this meet
ing depends .the future course of Chief
Arthur. Should a reasonable excuse be
found for it on one of the western roads
the Brotherhood men will probably be
called out. It is believed by many that
every Western road is liable under a
strict neutrality construction to have its
men taken out by Tuesday rr.orning. Offi
cers of the Brotherhood now admit that
nothing: satisfactory will come of their
order to the engineers and firemen of the
Beading Railroad to quit work, and dis
patches from the East this morning con
firm this belief.
Now that the order lias not been
obeyed the temporary check put upQn
the Knights who came to this city yes
terday to secure the places of the
strikers has been removed, and "the Bur
lington can resuttte the work of hiring
willing Knights of Labor. Master Work
man Cahill only succeeded in sending
back East twenty-five to thirty of the
Reading men, and it required an induce
ment in the shape of Brotherhood money
to accomplish even this much.
At the offices of the Burlington Com
pany it was not thought that the
Brotherhood would carry out their
threat to call off the engineers and fire
men on other Western roads.
'Their object, of course," said one of
the officials, "is to endeavor to bring
such a pressure from public and other
roads to bear on us that it will compel
us to accede to their demands. We have
made no attempt to move through
freight, and will not attempt to do so
till we have comp'etely mobilized our
local traffic. Then we will receive and
handle through freight, and should any
attempt be made to cut us off from ac
commodations by connecting lines, we
will try what virtue.there is in the Inter
state Commerce law. We can compel
other roads to handle our cars or we can
make them pay $.),000 for every car they
refuse.
'We are moving freight trains now al
most to our usual caiacity on the Iowa,
Nebraska and Missouri lines, and will
have our own line of service complete
next week. The fight on the other
roads by the Brotherhood will be made
solely on account of freight traffic."
MONEY FOR THE STRIKERS,
Atchison, Kan., March 8. The strik
ing engineers on the Burlington system
held a secret meeting here last night. It
is understood a telegram was iceived
from the Northern Pacific engine
pledging them $ 75,000 if necessary.
THE HATFIELDS.
Judge Barr Remands the West Virginia Prisioners
to Pike County.
Louisville, Ky., March 3. In the
United States District Court this morn
ing Judge Barr remanded the West Vir
ginia prisoners, the Hat fields, to the
charge of the Pike County officials. This
is a victory for the State of Kentucky.
An appeal to the United States Circuit
Court from District Judge Barr's opinion
was taken this afternoon by Hon. Eus
tice Gibson, Attorney for the State of
West Virginia. The case had a very
amusing close. While the immediate
disposition of the prisoners was under
consideration, Andrew V arney, one of
their number, got up and stated that he
wanted to be sent back to Pike County..
The court there would only be in session
for a week, and he wanted to be there in
time, as he felt sure he would prove his
innocence.
The court said : "If you made this ap
plication for a writ of habeas corpus you
would 1 there now." v .;.
Varney said: "It was not on my appli
cation that I was brought here. I did
not know a thing about this until I
was brought here."' ' -
The judge said he wished he had known
that before.":.;. - f. --N. ,
Varney said he -did not think it was
fair to make him and others suffer in
order that West Virginia might fight
her legal battle. " V -
This put , the laugh on the representa
tive of West Virginia, who, it will be re
membered, when he made the applica
tion for West Virginia represented that
the prisoners were ia great danger in Pike
County, and that they were most anxi
ous to be brought before the United
State Court in order to escape this
danger. . .. ,
Agriculture on Stilts.
Kehraska State Jounutl.
"Is California a good country in which
to raise potatoes!" h
"It would be but for one thing.' .
"What's that."
"Why, it's hard to dig them while you
are walking on stilts hve feet hitch.
"What in thunder do you want stilts
five feet high fori"
"Well, you see, rattlesnakes cannot
spring more than four leet.
. - Explained.
Baltimore American.
The fall of the inercurv yesterday was
most probably due to Lite effort of the
Dtandaru Uii company to pose aa a puL
lic blessing. ' -
OUR NATIONAL HOUSE.
The Pacific Rallroaa Telearaea Bill Passes A"i a
L0B3 (HscvsStftA.
- Washington, March 8. The Speaker
pro tern, laid before the House reporta
frorn the First Comptroller and the Com
missioner of Customs upon claims arising
under the eight hofir law.
. Henry C. Seymour, successor to R. C
Moffatt, of Michigan, deceased, appeared
before the bar of the House and took the
oath of office, "J.
Mr. Bacon, of New York, cliairman of
the Committee on Manufactures, offered
a resolution authorizing the expenditure
of $5,000 by that committee in investi
gating the subject of trusts. Adopted. ,
On motion of Mr. Dibble, of South
Carolina, the bill was passed appropri
ating $75,00) for the construction of a
revenue cutter for use at Charleston,
S. C. -..v..;: ; ; -. ,;;. .
j ; committee reports.
Mr. Dargan, of South Carolina, from
the Committee on Banking and Cur
rency, reported the bill authorizing the
issue of fractional silver certificates. Re
ferred to the committee of the whole, :
Mr. Crain, of Texas, from- the Com
mittee on Election of , President and
Vice President, reported back his joint
resolution proposing . constitutional
amendments changing the time for the
commencement of the Presidential term
aad changing the date for the annual
mating of Congress. Placed on the
calendar.
pacific railroad telegraph bill.
The House then resumed, as the special
order, the consideration of the Pacific
Railroad Telegraph bill.
MR. WHITE IN OPPOSITION. '
Mr. White, o' New York, took the
floor in oppwition to the measure. He
thought . that all remedial legislation
should make the' punishment fit the
crime, and that before lumbering up the
statutes with voluminous enactments,
legislators should assure themselves that
those enactments would have the de
sired effect. He then proceeded with a
legal argument in which he contended
that under the terms of the contract
between the Union Pacific Company and
the Western Union Company a vested
right had been created which could not,
under the decision of the Supreme Court
in the Union Pacific sinking fund case,
lie interfered with ; by s Congressional
action. Mr. White said, in conclusion,
that he was here to ' protest against an
archic . and communistic legislation
which would seek to legislate away the
property of a man acquired honorably -
and honestly under the forms of law.
MR. SYMES FAVORS IT.
Mr. Symes, of Colorado! said that the
purpose of the bill was merely to com
pel the subsidized railroads to comply
with the conditions and provisions of I
the grants creating them. The contracts
between the Union and Central Pacific
Railroad Companies and the Western
Union Telegraph Company were void
ab initio, and no lawyer in America
knew it better than the gentleman from
New York, (White). They were at the
time they were made, and they still were
indirect violations of express provisions
of the statutes and grants creating the
Pacific Railroad and Telegraph Compa
nies, and were in violation of public pol
icy and against public law. There were
numerous authorities to show that all
pooling contracts, with certain limita
tions, were void, and no contract could
be enforced if its conditions were against
the general good. : TLe contracts under
consideration had been made with the
object and intention of defeating every
substantial requirement of the grants.
After Jay GquM and his ring had con
ducted the Union Pacific as long as he
could make anything out of it, he had
walked off, leaving the company bank
rupted, and taking with him, among the
assets, the telegraphic lines, with which
.He levied discriminating tribute from
t.l.e people west of the Missouri River.
MR. DOCKERT FOR THE BILL.
Mr. Dockery, of Missouri, said that
under the granting acts the Pacific com
panies were required to construct not
only railroad lines bnt also telegraph
lines. Instead of doing so they had
assumed to divert themselves of their
obligations by contract with the Western
Union Telegraph Company, conferring
upon that company the exclusive right
of way along the railroad lines. The acts
of Congress requiring that the telegraph
lines along the Pacific railroads should
receive all business without discrimi
nation, were nullified by this unlawful
contract with the Western Union Com
pany. Upon these unlawful contracts
the gentleman from Ne w York (White)
had erected acsuperstructure of vested
right. The very language of the con
tracts showed that the railroad com
panies knew that they Vd no right to
enter into them. : " ;
THE BILL PASSES. '
Mr. White offered his substitute, which
was rejected without division and the
bill was passed. Yeas, 197, nays, 4 Bliss,
Ketchum, Merriman and White, of New
York. v
' Mrr Bland moved that the House ad
journ, and this motion being defeated,
in ordtr to prevent requests for unani
mous consent, he demanded the regular
order. . :- ...
The Speaker pro tem. announced the
regular order to be the further consider
ation of the bill to provide for the issue
of circulating notes to national banking
associations, and as this was the bill
which Bland has uniformly opposed, a
laugh was raised against him that he
should have unwittingly brought it be
fore the House, but he accomplished his
object, and the House at 4:45 adjourned.
Too Mnch for the Angels. ?
Boston Herald, .'A
The sayings of little folks are very
much the vognn jtiBt now, and well thev
may be, for there are no brighter saving
man inose ol cnuureo, ana certainly
none more genuine ex void of affectation,
and ihe more apparently remarkable
the reputed faring the more certain the
reader may be that it ia genuine, for no
grown arson could poesiMy invent things
nan so gooa as tnoae which come spon
taneously from the mouths of children.
Little Hans, the diminutive son ofTa verv
large and portly German, lost his sister
and playmate. "Ihe angels came and
took her away," . said bfc weeping
moiDer. nans was very tbougntrm and
still. At last he said: "Mamma, u na
was to die, the amrels t ouldn' t (arrt b im.
tould they? Dod would have to tome
THE CROWN PRINCE.
HOPE HAS DESERTED HIS BEDSIDE.
MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION BY
PROF. TVALDMEYER.
Only a(Questfon of Time The Ieir to the
Tbrout. Doomed Arrival ot Prince
. William at San Remo.
OtpyriQUed 18&S b the N. T. Ac1itel Pre.)
Berlin, March 3. The imperial fam
ily has ceased to hope for the recovery of
the Crown Prince. The first, results of
the miscroecopic examination by Pro.
fessor Waldmeyer, aa communicated to
the Emperor, are unfavorable, disclosing
traces of cancer in the pus arising from
the necrosis of the cartilage of the
larynx. The full official report of
Prof. Waldmeyer will lse delayed until
Dr. Recklinghausen makes an analysis.
Dr. Ziemmsen will probably also le re
quested to examine, the pus. Apart
from the results of the examination
court dispatches confirm the progress of
symptoms teudiug toward a fatal issue.
The occasional appearance of improve
ment is followed by a renewal of the
gravest indications. Thus on Thursday,
the Oown Prince seemed stronger and
in bright r spirits, but during the follow
ing night he was worse. -
The newspaper reports from San Remo
conflict. While the National Zeitung
says the patient is sleeping well, that his
spirits and appetite are better and that
he holds himself erect, the Borsvn
Courier and Norddeutaclie Zeitung on
the same day report that he had a bad
night. The decrease in his strength has
caused a saddening change in his ai-
pearance, and hat transformed him from
a robust into an aged and debilitated
mn, who is obviously suffering. The
conflict of reports does not weaken the
fact, based upon absolute information,
that in the highest official quarters every
hope has been abandoned of his recov
ery, iso immediate crisis is expected,
but it is recognized that a sudden change
for the worse may occur at any moment,
involving his death. :
If the disease should be permitted to
run its full course the Crown Prince
may be able to return to Berlin in May
and pass his last days there. The ques
tion of the period of his return will be
the only subject having a remote politi
cal bearing that will be discussed during
Prince William's presence at San Bemo,
and the decision arrived at will depend
on the personal inclination of the Crown
Prince and Princess, combined with the
advice of the physicians.
Since his family have recognized that
a fatal issue is most probable, the Crown
Prince himself has expressed an urgent
desire to return to Berlin as soon as pos
sible. He has slated his intention to the
Emperor, who coincides with the Crown
Prince, and has relinquished his pro
posed journey to San Remo. The
respites from suffering that the Crown
Prince obtains encourages the confi
dence that he will be enabled to return
to Berlin. If he is fated to die suddenly
at San Remo he has everything ready.
He has written his will and prepared a
political testament for his successor. -
The presence of Prince William at the
villa has cheered his mother. Signifi
cance is attributed to the fact that none
of his family met him at San Remo sta-J
tion. When he arrived from Genoa in
company with the Princess, his brother
and Professor Bergman, he was received
by the prefect, themayor and German
consul. This arrangement was due to
the Crown Prince, who sent instructions
to Prince William at Carlsrhue that
Prince Henry with Dr. Bergmann
would meet him, the obvious object
being to enable him to gain a full
knowledge of the condition of his father
before seeing his mother and sisters.
The Crown Princess, with the Princesses.
awaited him within the villa. It is
understood that he received the warmest
welcome, and that many tears -were
shed during the interview. ;
During yesterday and to-day Prince
William has been with the Crown Prince
on the balcony and there was every ap
pearance of cordiality between father
and son. The reports of coolness in
their relations are chiefly attributed to
French sources. The French papers vie
with each other in malicious inventions.
During the journey from Carlsruhe
Prince William obtained a number of
French papers, .and was excited to
anger by the stories in them of his self
ish intention toward the Crown Prince
and his callous disregard of his father's
suffering.' ; .
Throughout Germany public interest
in the news from San Remo grows in
intensity. The people of Berlin await
dispatches with the same eagerness and
agitation as would be shown if a cam
paign involving the fate of the nation
were in progress. Extra editions are
rushed out and the papers are excitedly
read and discussed by groups on the
8treeta. '; " . . ;
V' BrLLETTX FROM SAN REMO.
has Remo, March 8. The Crown
Prince of Germany passed a fairly good
night. There is no change in his condi
tion as regards coughing and spitting.
He feels stronger this morning, in con
sequence, of .' the good day experienced
yesterday. The weather ia brilliant and
the Crown Prince will again sit awhile
upon the balcony to-day. y -
DR. KrBSMATJL'S OPINION.
London, March 3. A dispatch from
San Remo states that Dr. Kussmaul has
written a letter in which he says the dis
charge from the German Crown Prince's
throat comes from the seat of tlie throat.
It is entirelv devoid of smell.
Distensions ia ihe Paraell Banks.
Dublin, March 3.-The Ejcprrss affirms
that there are internal dissensions in the
Pamellite ranks, which wilt prod ace a
rupture that will shake the foundations
of the National League. American in
spiration, it says, is causing a number
of leagues to join the Gallic Association,
which opposes Parnell's policy.
THE SNOW STORM.
I ncrcaa me In the Martha st Trains Bleck4 la
Northern Michigan.
. Chicago, March 3. A dispatch from
Fargo, Dak., says dispatches from the
west saynthe storm is increasing in vio
lence, and that the snow, is drifting
badly. No freight trains have been sent
west from that point over the Northern
Pacific road during the last two days.
XO MAILS SINCE WEDNESDAY.
- Dispatches from northern Michigan
says all the upper peninsula railroads
are blocked. The storm of Thursday
and Friday was one of the most severe
ever known. The snow fall was accom
panied by a heavy gale. The storm
reached the entire length of Lake Supe
rior and well down into the southern
peninsula, where the roads are also re
ported badly crippled. The snow drifted
six to ten feet deep. At Cheboygan, St
Iguace and Mackinac several trains are
stalled, and no mails have ventured
through since Wednesday. ,
LARUE FIRE IN MILWAUKEE.
Feroeck 4 Bros, and Several Other Firms
Burned Out-Loss $200,000.
Milwaukee, March S.J. Ferneek &
Bros,' candy factory", occupying a large,
five story brick block on East Water
street, between Michigan and Huron
streets, was entirely burned early this
morning. Goldsmith & Co. 's carpet ware
room adjoining the Ferneek building on
the north was gutted in the tipper stories.
The entire stock was ruined by smoke
and water. H. Berger & Co.'s matress
factory, A. Wiezel's feather establish
ment, and W. Loewenback's printing
house, occupying apartments in the
building south of Ferneck'a factory, also
suffered heavy damage by water. The
oss is upwards of 00,000 with small
insurance. ,
LIFE INSURANCE CONSPIRACY.
om Ngrces in Charleston Hatch a Plot b
Which to Make Money.
Charleston, S. C, March 3. In Jan
uary Joseph B. Dudley, colored, was
alleged to have died. He was insured
in the United States Mutual Accident
Association and Traders and Travelers
Company, both of New York, each com
pany having issued a policy on his life
for $."5,000. Suspicion of foul play arose.
and the companies sent a Pinkerton
detective here. The investigation, which
has been in progress for about a week,
resulted to-day in the voluntary con
fession from two colored men that no
such person as Dudley ever lived, and
that the corpse alleged to be his was ob
tained in the colored graveyartfand rep
resented to be the body of the fictitious
Dudley. The transaction was a con
spiracy to secure the insurance monev.
thidley's alleged wife has made her
escape. ,
RAILMAKERS IN SESSION.
Meeting to Decide the Proposition to Be Allotted le
Each Mill,
- Pittsburg, March 3. Representatives
of all of the steel rail mills in the country
are holding a secret meeting here to de
cide what proportion of the output shall
be allotted to each of the twelve nfyis.
It .is estimated that the productionW
steel rails for 1888 will be fully 50 per
cent less than last year, and in order
to avoid an entire demoralization of
trade, manufacturers are making ar
rangements to act in harmony during
the coming year. It is axp. ;ted that
operations will be resumed in the course
cf a few weeks. The conference is being
watched with great interest by the em
ployees of the Edgar Thompson and
Homestead rail mills in this city- and
also by the coke operators. The former
are' anxious to return to work and the
coke men are waiting for orders.
The International Council of Women.
Washington, March 3. An interna
tional council of women will meet in
this city March S3, for an eight days con
vention. During the convention the
National Women's Suffrage Association
will publish a sixteen-page daily paper,
edited by Mrs. Clara B. Colby. The
council is not confined to woman's suf
frage alone, but will be composed of
delegates from organisations of all de
scriptions, that are composed exclu
sively of women.
WorlMngton-Post Contested Election.
Washington, March 3. Upon the
recommendation of the sub-committee
which had been charged with the ex
amination of the legal points involved
in the Worthington-Post contested elec
tion case, the House Committee on Elec
tions to-day unanimously decided to re
port in favor of the claims of Post, the
Republican sitting member from the
Tenth Illinois District. .
Archblthes Ryan's Opinion.
Dublin, March 8. Archbishop Ryan,
of Philadelphia, who is in this city, in an
interview said that no American ap
proved of Ireland's separating from Eng
land. Americans, he said, objected to
weakening the control of the Govern
ment at Washington, and he believed
that likewise England would be stronger
if home rule was granted to Ireland.
He Knew Watts. ,
The Tradesman.
Many will be surprised to hear that a
man who knew James Wat Is lived to see
the dawn of the present year. This gen
tleman, Mr. Thomas Locknart. who re
cently died in Glasgow, at uw aire of
n-r i-l J l;. 1 1 ' i - i - .1
17 4 . uou 11 lci iu a. .iiLtiiijjt) seen uie
virtual birth of the steam engine, and
had witnessed its marvellous growth
and the corresponding advance in all
branches of mechanical erunneerintr.
The startling nature of this rapid prbgress
is well illustrated bv a remark in a letter
of James Watts, where he observes that
he had just made a piston that fitted "the
cylinder so truly that a half-crown could
hardly be inserted between them at any
point of the bore. As this coin is larger
.than a silver half dollar, the accuracy
of workmanship in those days seems to
belong to another age. And yet it has
been compassed, in the lifetime, of one
old man. It is said that Mr. Lockhart
preserved a vivid impression of the great
inventor, anl wis always pleased to re
call the cu-cumstai.ces which brought
them together. - -
ADDITIONAL LOCAL.
5 " A Hotable Book.
Dr. Schaffranek'a notable work, "'A
Floral Almanac of Florida," which marks
a new era in the scientific history of Flor
ida is off the press. This State has badly
lacked a floral guide. The botanist and
florist will find in Dr. Schaffranek's
work an indispensible aid. It gives
one . thousand and seven hun
dred of the - phaeno4anious plants
of Florida arranged'' according to
order in which they bloom, arranged in
columns. The first column gives, the
mouth of blooming, the next the serial
number, the third the name of the plant
and authority for the name, the fourth
the natural order to which the plant
belongs, the fifth the locality in which
it may be found aa "dry sand.
west coast," or "river banks, Pa
latka." The new species marked "n. sp."
are those discovered by Dr. Schaffranek.
Neither .Gray nor Wood adequately
cover Florida. Every alternate page ia
blank for the convenience of those who
wish to use the book as a check list The
book is for sale by Sands, the taxider
mist, and Riles, the jeweler.
NEW VESSEL LAUNCHED.
Splendid Ceremonies at the Dedication of
a New Vessel in Palatka.
An interesting ceremony was observed
at the foot of Madison street, last night
A new vessel was added to our merchant
marine. A number of guest of the Put
nam was present when the new vessel,
christened the M. E. Wilkins, was
launched. The glorious banner of the
free floated at her mast he; d and an
af?b of evergteens and Spanish moss was
sprui3tidBhips, beneath which fair
ladies sat while other representatives of
the gentle sex that controls the world
and draws us "with a single hair" sat in
the bow and the stern.
N. B. Bryant of Boston, one of the
most ' eloquent lawyers of the old com
monwealth of the Puritans delivered an
eloquent speech in which he referred to
this auspicious occasion as a proof that
all that had been said of the decadence
of the merchant marine of this country,
the decay of the shipping interest was '
baseless, for here in the heart of Florida
was another vessel to be launched upon j
the mercantile waters of this great and
glorious Union. . A happy response was
made by Gov. Young, of Iowa, and the
vessel was then committed to the waves
which she was expected to ride as a
thing of life.
Just as site was let go the strains of
"Nancy Lee" broke forth from a hidden
cornet As her sternpost struck the
water, a young5 lady at the bow at
tempted to christen the boat. Repeated
attempts were made, but the champaigns
bottle chosen was quite as strong as the
stern of the boat, and it slipped from
the weak and pretty hands that held it
into the river, so tliat the river itself was
christened the M. E. Wilkins instead of
the boat
When they were out in the stream it
was found that no means had been pro
vided to control the boat and one of the
fair and ready minded inmates was com
pelled to seize a board and bring her
back to shore to the strains of "Home
Again" and "Row for the Shore" from
the hidden cornet player in the middle
distance.
The new vessel ia handsomely decora
ted in a beautiful brindle style after the
latest edicts of the aesthetic schools, and
bears its name in bold' letters on the
bows. The new vessel is fifteen feet over
all, four feet in beam and is designed for
the fishing trade. It is named after a
fair denizen of the City of Brotherly
Love.
"Lay him off, Mr. Mayor, he wants to
run for Marshal."
DOWN AT DAYTONA.
Happenings Here and There Along the Coast
Lengtellea's Da.
Corrcixmiltnt of f fee Palatka Aeirs.
Daytona, March 2.
W. R. Smith has been admitted to the
firm of Mathews & Thompson, who will
continue trade under the old name.
Their large stock will be increased
within the coming fortnight
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob A. Henry, of Joliet,
III t arrived Wednesday evening. They
are highly f leaded, and intend remaining
with us about two months, if possible.
Longfeilow's Day was observed at the
public school to-day by a number of
pleasant exercises prepared for the oc
casion. Many selections from Longfel
low's Poems were recited with much
feeling by the pupils. - Upon completion
of the programme, school was dismissed
for the remainder of the day.-
E. N. Waldroa returned last evening
from Jupiter, Fla., where ha has spent
the past two' months in starting a cocoa
nut grove. Charles E. Jackson de
parted for the same point Monday to be
absent about one month.
Books for the registration of voters in
Precinct No. 8 were opened .yesterday
by S. C. Weaver, who will attend busi
ness at J. EL Niver's store until the loth
Lost .
The germ an git en last evening at the
Atlantic Opera House ' was a success in
every feature. . Music furnished by
Messrs. Helme & Hirst was enough in
itself to lend a charmed effect to the
aance. adouc mteen couples were
present to enjoy the festivities. .
This evening another scene of gaiety
will present itself at the Opera House, in
the form of a fancy dress reception by
the D. D. & L. C. It is supposed that
the reception will have a greater attend
ance than last night's germ an. AH
mcaabers are enjoined to come out with
fancy coetnnws. and make the affair a
success. -
Work on the Balcom block began
Monday and pushed with vigor, is now
checked from the, want of brick. Upcn
arrival of same Contractor WaWroff win
TV lit rn m lawo mt in cwAer to effect
an early completion. When done it will
be a handsome ornament to Daytona,
being the first rick structure built,
which reflects mocb credit upon Cap
tain Balcom. the orcawor.
Additional St. Ausjustlne.
TETJTH3 FEOM THE TOUBISTS.
Wit and Wisdom from the St Angustine
Museum Segister.
The visitors register at Chapin's St
Augustine Museum, near Fort Marion,
has on! each -page a wide- space headed
"Remarks," and the remarks written
therein by the various visitors are ex
ceedingly interesting reading. We give
herewith another installment:
"A charming old town.".
"A good place to spend your surplus."
"Wonderfully interesting."
"A slow old town."
"Full of historical interest
"Grand except its streets, which are a
disgrace to any civilized place." .
"Must say St Augustine is grand."
"Nothing surpasses it in history."
"It will repay a visit of a thousand
miles." .
' "A quaint old city, whose beauty is
being marred by the modern buildings."
"It is like going to a European town.
Americans should see their own country
before going abroad."'
"A quaint old town, that' seems to
carry one back for several centuries." .
"Bad in wet weather; delightful when
the sun shines." ,
"A good place to skin Yankees." . .
"St Augustine, the gem of the South.
"Nice climate and very poor walking."
"Too much rain for comfort."
"St. George street ought to be paved."
"They ootghi to plant pond lillies in
the middle of the streets to improve the
looks of the town."
"A wonderful city! How sad that
Ponce de Leon did not realize his dream
of perpetual youthf 1 .
"The most attractive of all Southern
winter resorts."
"It is a good place to be if you can get
away when you feel like it." .
I've been here for twelve years and
am not dead yet."
"A moonlight stroll over the sea-wall
must be lovely with 'her.
"Now going for a Bail: sure to Lave a
good time."
''Everybody should see St. Augustine
and this famous museum."
"This collection of curios cannot be .
beat."
"I would like to stay here."
"Delighted! will come again." -.
"If I were sick I would come to Flor
ida; if 1 were well 1 should go some
where else."
"En Floride voire et inourir."
"Tel serait raon plus grand desir."
"A nice place in winter, but give me
the North for a permanent residence."
'A lovely old place. All it ' lacks is a
cool temperature."
"You just wait for a cold snap. Ugh!"
"After visiting every depart
ment of , tho Museum I con
sider that a month or more could be
very profitably spent in the study of the
different objects. My visit has been in
teresting and instructive."
"A city of fleas, flies and flowers."
"Florida, the dearest spot on earth
to me, been in the State three years, my
husband made well by coming. A large
family and all members of Christ's
Church. All children should see this
collection of curiosities."
' "We're glad to say that we have seen
the quaint old town of St Augustine.
Though glad we've been, yet still we
know we shall be gladder still to go."
"The valuable collection of gold ore
from the Duhlonega 'gold mines should
be seen by every one interested in the
South."
"Good place, but requires a fat pocket
book." ,
"Two sprigs of the law on business
bent, to the Land of Flowers ' lately
went" .
"Where are all the pretty women?"
"Highly pleased, particularly with the
bargains offered at the Tourists store."
"Thanks to the proprietor of the
Museum for bringing so much of the
world to us f r the small sum of twenty
five cents." '
"St. Augustine is lovely now; but
later on visit Jan-ell's Hotel, High Poi nt.
N. C. Nothing more beautiful than that
climate in May."
"Magnificent! Wish I had brought my
mother-in-law along."
"St. Augustine U like a glorious sun
set"
"To collect the contents of this Mu
seum represents a life work."
"Too hot to be witty." , . ,
"The lazy man's heaven."
A 'gentleman from Denver et rites:
Like our" grand Colorado, Florida af.
fords a diversity of attractions."
"Got my money's worth here, and so
will anv one else who takes in this Mu
seum."
"Valuable relics in this Museum."
An Ohio man writes: "The Buckeyes
are bound to Bhow up everywhere."
"Jut ought to hang the man that has
charge of the streets." "Give me the
hiiis." ,. .
"EiLe sehr schoene stadt" -"Oh
take me back to New York!"
"Was here eleven years ago, quite a
change."-. -". --.j.,?
"Good deal of sand to tlie acre."
"Daily discovering new objects of in
terest" : ,
"I should need a volume to express
one-half of what I think of Florida
wonderful!" - -
"Mucho gusto medk el dia que pase
aqui." , v '-- :--': - .. ,w
"The dear old city, I never shall for
get my first visit."
- "My expectations have been realized.
.And thus they go on, filling page after
page. The Mjseum ia "drawing" like a
mustard plaster, but gives much more
pleasure than that useful article
PresUeatial Beeeptlen ia 4e Woods.
" LaGraage item in Tltasville Star.
An incident which I desire to mention
was the meeting at Ma v Tow n, of the
train which bore Mr. Cleveland and his
friends- We bad been aide-tracked to
altoe the train to pass. As it came op
posite out position it stopped, and there,
Inthe pine woods, under the blue skies
of Florida; the chief ruler of sixty mil
lions of people, came out of his coach
and saluted and shook hands with his
fellow citisene. Ladies and gentlemen,
ot all poUticad parties, greeted him and
his charminx wife. Thic scene of wel
come and security these wild wco,"i
was a r?-J, a rlLr exhAtkicT t 9
trb-"-aAcf osr r-i: iert;:
Written far thtPniaOfn Jfsva.1
FLORIDA PLANTS.
Oar ef etaste ana Flower Careens- Meic:aal
Privets Treasare.
SY PR- A. 8CBAITRASBK PALATKA. IXA-
XXIL
AVBANTIACE.: CITRCS FAKILT.
Spring "with - all the freshness
of its beauty is yet with us, ev
erywhere the woods are white
with the blossomed plum and dog-wood
and the trees are attired in the gayest
gXn. The morning breeze comes to us
hwten with the mingled perfume of my
riad oran ge buds expanding into flower,
to greet
A morn, the loveliest which the year bas ween
Now ol the spring, yet fresh with ail Its green
For a warm eve and irentle daw at nixht.
Have left a sparkling welcome for toe light.
The most important plants of , the nat
ural order Aurantiaceaj are. those of the
genus citrus; which have been cultivated
for more than seventeen hundred years
in the Southern part of Europe and since
many years in the Southern States of
North America, as well as in all tho
warm countries of the globe. The geuus '
citrus contains a great Clumber of vari- .
eties, tlie moot of them have been' im
ported from their native places, from -Asia,
Northern India and Japan, while
others have been propagated by indus
trious nurserymen and frait growers.
Noissetteono of the celebrated French
botanists, describes already in 1825 one
hundred and sixty varieties. In regard
to medicine tlie number of varieties ia
very limited, the following sorts are al
ways more preferable for medicinal pur
poses, tluvn others namely:
1. CiTRCS ACRASTlfJt RlS-SOu The
common sweet orange a native of the
forests of the Himalayas and
China with ovate, oblong leaves which
sometimes appear acute, serrulate, pet-
iole more or less winged; flowers white;
fruit roundish, occasionally oblong, .
mammose with the cortical vesicles con- .
vex. - The pulp of tho fruit is sweet,
refrigerant; rind contains aromatioand
tonic principles, while the leaves show
bitter and aromatic properties.
2. Citrcs Biqaradia Risso. The Se
ville orange cultivated mostly in the
South of ljurope and to be found tn dif
ferent nurseries f Southern California
and Florida, spiny, leaves elliptical acute
petkjl winged; flowers snow white;
fruiViJdle-siiteJ, roundish, smooth or .
wrinkled, V deep yellow, with concave
oil cysts; the pulp of the fruit is acid and
bitter and the" rind contains very bitter, -
aromatic and tonic virtues. The flowers
yield that costly oil-called oil of Neroli.
white the crushed fruit boiled in sugar
forms marmalade. The essential oil is
recommended as a very good antispas
modic and stimulant remedy, from this
orange flower water is chiefly 'obtained.
3. Citrus Berqamia Risso. The Ber-
gamot orange, Mellaroaa chiefly culti
vated in Southern Europe, rare in this
country, has brittle branches, leaves ob
long, with a winged petiole, dark green
above, pale beneath, flowers small.
white, fruit pyriform smooth, pale yel
low with a green subacid firm fragrant -pulp;
the rind is extremely fragrant, the
essential oil, oil of Bergamot obtained "
from the flowers and fruits is largely em
ployed by perfumers. .
4. Citrcs Ijmoncm Risso. The com
mon lemon, a native of the forests of In- --
dia, has ovate or oblong, usually serru
late, pale green leaves, with a winged .
petiole; flowers middle-sized, red out
side; fruit oblong, wriakled or furrowed; -
pale yellow, with the oil cysts ooncave,
rind thin, pulp very acid. The rind con
tains, besides a peculiar fragrance, bitter
aromatic and stomachic properties,
wiuw, 'jumv tonics ngreeaute, aciu,
and is -- commended as a refrigerant,
antiscorbutic remedy, used in febrile
complaints, while the preparation ef .. .
fervescing draughts, lemona ' A """S ;
against scurvy. ' "-'. '
5. Citrcs Lcmia Risso. The sweet
lemon of the same quality and uses aa
the foregoing variety, of wiicti, how
ever, its juice wants the peculiar sharp
ness. The sweet lemon is mostly cuiti- s
vated in the Southern part of Europe
has ovate oblong, serrulate, pale green
leaves, with a winged - petiole, flowers
middle-sized, red outside, fruit oblong,
wrinkled or furrowed, pale yellow, with
the oil cysts concave, it resembles there- -fore
very much the common lemon, but
differs only in the pulp, which is sweet -instead
of acid.
6. Citrcs Acid a Roxburgh. Tfc
lime is a native of Northern India and
China, also cultivated in all sub-tropical
countries of the globe; form, a tpLzr
tree; sometimes . more '" or. less -of at .
6hrnbby character, with oval, oblong or .
ovate oblong, crenate, obtuse leaves,
petioles winged, petals generally four.
fruit small, blunt, oval or oblong, with
thin rind and an extremely acL? juicev-
The rind contains aromatic, the pulp an-.
tiscorbutic properties.: It is used aatLs
lenica, but Die acidity is sharper and
rather more agreeable. : : -
7. Cttrcb LnfETTA Risso. The sweet
lime, a native of Northern India and
China, but at present cultivated every
where in all sub-tropical countries, j -duces
ovate, obovate and oblong Vaav j;
petiole almost winglesa; flowers s'''
white; fruit ovate or roundish, pale
low, with a raised point and ""
cysts of oil; pulp sub-acid; inr-
upect inferior to the lemon, fcrtn t
fruit anyhow, for it is said i
many people that lime eaten et- J f ' '
morning will prevent the f er"c'
a r-, t DECOtASfr K-iljJ. T
-The
shaddock, ery wellnown tfruui t
every Floridian, has large leaves wi:i r
Broad winged, petiole; flowers wLLl?, ,
very large, fruit very large, rotmdlJi,
pale yellow; rind with flat or convex oil
cysts, white and spongy, palp gjec-i,
gab-acid, watery. The frtit cc um V
aromatic and aub-cid properties, ar 1 li
used as a pleasant cooling fruit ii i
serves.""" 1 '
9. Citrcs Medica E ". 7! " -ron
and cedrate, native of t.e f
Northem India, but cul ivat:l i
warm countries, ha of' . t
leaves, flowers violet out,'
warted and furrowed acr
as pumpkins; rind trr- '
nnlp snb-acii.
frir3T--tt, bet r- '
an i Ur'a r
ril
n-
X

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