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The weekly times-record. (Valley City, N.D.) 1912-1922, October 31, 1912, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074274/1912-10-31/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
SENATOR McCUMBER
progress along every line of human
welfare, in effective acts and not loud
words, Mr. Taft has achieved more
than any president since the days of
Lincoln. He stands for sane progress
along sane lines.
Effect on the Farmer.
"There was never a time in the his
tory of the United States when a giv
en amount of expended energy on the
farm would bring as great a return as
it does today. There never was a
time when a bushel of wheat, barley,
corn, Tye, when a dozen of eggs, a
pound of butter, a spring chicken, a
cow, a steer, a sheep, a horse or a
liog would purchase as much as it
does today. What part has our protec
tive policy had in producing this re
sult? That system in forty years has
changed this country from a condi
tion in which two men were produc
ing the food for one man to eat, to a
condition where one man is producing
the food for two men to eat, and that
is most important. That system has
built up vast cities and mighty popu
lations to consume the farmers prod
ucts right at home and not from
3,000 to 6,000 miles away.
Comparative Purchasing Power.
"The number of bushels of corn
that would sell foT $100 under the Mc
Kinley law sold for $73 under the Wil
son-Gorman law. The same number of
bushels of corn that sold for $100 un
der the Wilson^Gorman law sold for
$171 under the Dingley law.
Phone 180
MAKES
PASSIONEO PLEAFOR REP. TICKET
Senior Senator from North Dakota in Eloquent
Address Contrasts Party Attitudes on Tariff
Questions at Court House Last Night.
(From Saturday's Daily) I "The same number of bushels of
Speaking for more than two hours I wheat that sold for $100 under the Me
at the courthouse last night, United
States Senator McCumber made what
•was without doubt the most forceful
and eloquent appeal for republican
party loyalty presented in the state
during the campaign of 1912- His ad
dress was devoted principally to the
farmers, and his arguments for the
support of President Taft were among
the strongest and most forceful yet
beard here. Senator McCumber said
among other things:
"I think President Taft made a mis
take in his support of Canadian reci
procity, but his motive was honest and
sincere. I believe he now sees it was
mistake, but he is not a political trim
mer and is not trying to escape his
responsibility for an error by .saying:
"You are a liar, I never said it.'
"But how about Mr. Wilson and the
democratic platform? Mr. Wilson de
clares absolutely in favor of Canadian
reciprocity, condemns the democrats
who voted against its repeal, and the
democratic platform declares against
any protection upon any of the neces
saries of life, which of course means
food products. So, we have Taft
standing on a republican platform
which is against reciprocity on one
side, and Mr. Wilson standing on a
democratic platform and declaring for
free trade in food products.
"If we are sincere in our opposition
to reciprocity, we are bound to sup
port Mr. Taft and the republican ad
ministration. In the field of actual
sold
are the only kind we sell
When buying our selection of brushes we subject
them to all kinds of tests and we absolutely guaran
tee them to be the best you will find for the price in
this section of the country.
Come in and let us show you—even If you
do not buy. We value our brush reputation
Tooth Brushes Hand Brushes
Hair Brushes, Infant Brushes
Clothes Brushes Brush Sets
CITY DRUG STORE
"The Store ol Better Values"
C. N. McGILLIVRAY, Proprietor
IM-
Kinley law sold for $93 under the Wil
son-Gorman law and for $151 under
the Dingley law. The same number
of bushels of oats that sold for $100
under the McKinley law sold for $75
under the Wilson-Gorman law and
$159 under the Dingley law. Barley
that
for $100 under the McKinley
law brought $66 under the Wilsou law
and $173 under the Dingley law. Po
tatoes that sold for $100 under ihe
McKinley law and for $70 under the
Wilson law, sold for $179 under rhe
Dingley law. A horse which sold »"or
$100 during the '.McKinley law sold
for $62 during the Wilson law and the
horse that sold for $100 during the
Wilson law sold for $217 under the
Dingley law.
Butter that brought $100 under the
McKinley law brought $65 under the
Wilson-Gorman law, and butter that
brought $100 under the Wilson law
sold for $159 under the Dingley law.
Eggs that brought $100 under the Wil
son law brought $162 under the Ding
ley law. Wool that brought $100 un
der the Wilson-Gorman law brought
$164 under the Dingley law.
Keep the Mills Running.
"What is more important to us than
a slight raise in the things we buy is
the great raise in the things, we sell.
We always sell twice as much as we
use for clothing and food,...and we use
this balance for the intangible ex
penses of life, for education, for the
churches, for traveling, for amuse
ments and thousands of things that
are not absolutely essential and these
expenses make up the greater part of
the expenses of the American people.
When we receive a high pric§ for our
products, though we may pay consid
erably more for the necessaries of life,
the balance in our favor will lie many
times greater under the higher price
system:
"The farmer must not only have
something to sell but he must have
something to sell to people who have
something to pay with and if we close
our mills again as we did during the
last democratic administration, we
shall reduce the ability of the vast
manufacturing population of the coun
try to purchase the farmers' products
which will necessarily result in reduc
ing their value as it did from 1398 to
1897."
Bismarck Tribune: Hon. Frank
White and Hon. Frank E. Ployhar of
Valley City have returned to Bismarck
from the southern part of Morton
county where they have been looking
over some land in the vicinity of
Shields. They stated that conditions
in Morton county were exceptionally
fine this year.
Mrs. L. T. Larson of Dazey, was
shopping and visiting with friends in
the city on Friday.
Phone society news to society ed
itor, phone No. 4.
Main Street.^afey^riy, No. Dak.
lltillf
THE WEEKLY TIMES-RECORD, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1912.
AKOTA
Every peraon needs a business
training. It costs no more at this
[great Business, Banking and
Shorthand college, under exact
office conditions, tlian at a small,
questionable' one. The results are,
however, very different. .350 0.
B. O. pupils went to excellent
positions in banka and offices tbls
jrear—bad calla for over 500. All
Fargo banks and 685 others em
ploy D. B. C. pupils as casblers,
teller*, bookkeepers or stenogra
phers. No otber school offers
such endorsement.
E E I, O S
Celebrate Golden
Wedding Day
MR. AND MRS. p. W. NOXEN OB
SERVE THEIR FIFTIETH AN
NIVERSARY.
On the 18th day of October, 1862,
in the village of Shomburg, York
county, Ont., Mr. iPhillip W. Noxon,
of Sophiasburg, iPrince Edward coun
ty, Ont., and Miss Catherine W. Arm
itage of the first named village, -were
united in the holy bonds of matri
mony-
Just 50 years later, on Friday, Oct.
18, 1912, a merry, happy party of rel
atives gathered at their home, 601
Conkling avenue, Valley City, North
Dakota, to celebrate the golden anni
versary of that marriage.
All of their children, together with
their wives and husbands, were pres
ent, as follows:
E. J. Noxon and wife, Lottie, of St.
Louis, Mo.
J. W. Noxon and wife, Lena, of Val
ley 'City, 'N. D.
'Ella (Noxon) and husband, Herbert
Y. Cooper of Bloomfleld, Ont.
Mary (Noxon) and husband, Sam
uel Oglesby, of Valley City, N. D..
Stephen J. Noxon and wife, Daisy,
of Valley City, N, D.
Emmy (Noxon) and husband, Jo
seph Pickard, of Wimbledon, N. D.
Eight grandchildren were present
and eight absent. These with those
above mentioned, thirty in all, all liv
ing, making an unbroken chain from
which the grim reaper has not yet
severed a link.
At 2 p. m. a sumptuous dinner was
spread. The table was set in gold
and white and cut glass. Appropriate
place cards and napkins were also in
gold and white. The wedding cake
was decorated with united hearts il
luminated in gold letters "with the
places and dates of the two events.
The floral decorations were golden
chrysanthemums in profusion.
The gift from the groom to the
bride was a beautiful sunburst of
The occasion was most enjoyable
and the heartfelt wish of the many
firends of the esteemed couple is that
their setting sun of life may not go
beneath the horizon of time for many,
many years to come.
Beginning today books will be
found at the several voting places in
the city and every voter should make
sure that his name is registered. On
Tuesday of next week each of the
polling places will be open all day
and until eight in the evening so that
every one "will have a chance to see
that they are propelry registered.
Read the Times-Record.
pearls and diamonds. The bride's gift War have these theorists been given
to the groom was a handsome gold- a chance to see what they could do
headed ebony cane. The children pre- and what they did do is still a night
sented to their father and mother each
a beautiful gild handled umbrella.
GREAT THEORIES AND THEORISTS
(Furnished by [Progressive Com.)
Louis D. Brandies, the J. Hufus Wal
ingford of the democratic party, is
chiefly noted for his theories. "Not
on one subject, but on all of them,
or nearly so.
Last year he startled the whole
United States by announcing he
would save the railroads a million
dollars a day if they would but adopt
his theories. In other words he
would increase their net earnings
from 40 to 50 per cent. He spent
much time in explaining to the Inter
state Commerce Commission how it
could be done. But they could not
see the point, and only smiled. Nor
did the railroads care for the money
anyway.
Now this is the same man that
tells Woodrow Wilson and everybody
else that he can write a law that will
make the dissolved Standard Oil com
pany compete with itself, and: Pro
fessor Wilson said it was great dope
for the "Fall Races-''
One peculiar characteristic of these
great theorists, is that they are •will
ing to believe most anything if it is
only a theory, ?nd .(Professor Wilson
is well qualified in this way. He has
spent the greater potrion of his life
as a teacher of theories. For many
years he has been president of one
of the largest "Theory Factories" in
the United States.
The democratic party has been not
ed for its theories. The only time
they were given a chance to prac
tice them, they were told by their
esident that they were confronted
with a condition, not a theory.
The three great theories of the
democratic party was slavery, state's
rights, and tariff for revenue only.
The slavery theory was stricken from
the democratic .platform by force of
arms.
.Regularly for more than a half a
century, the democrats have submit
ted their theories of state's rights
and tariff for revenue only to the peo
ple and each time defated with one
exception. Only once since the Civil
mare to our older business men.
The democratic party has had many
passing theorists and theories. If by
IT'S DIFFERENT
NO DUST
btA^siLKl
SHINE
STAYS
I II
[IBROVEPGLL^N I
USEO
AND SOLD BY
HARDWARE DEALERS
E A A IN I O A
BSIll
USINESS
Oar $60 course prepares for business
or for position as clerk or bookkeeper.
Our new 905 course in Commerce and
Banking (endorsed by Bankers' Asso
ciation), supplies cashiers snd tellers
for the Northwestern banks, and
bookkeepers and credit men for the
larger concerns. The shorthand
ourme (under two expert reporters),
rains court reporters and high grade
tenographers. The stenographers for
he U. & District Court, N. D. So
reme Court, Third Judicial District
nd the Case Co. Conrt are D. B. C.
[graduates. Do otber schools effer this
PROOF of superior training
A I N S O
Greater Speed—Greater Accuracy—Greater Efficiency
Are the logical results of installing the
Underwood
Freight Train Kills
Team at Fingal
1
POLE TEAM OF FOUR HORSE RIG
KILLED AND DRIVER BADLY
INJURED YESTERDAY
Friday at noon while crossing the
tracks of the Soo railroad at Fingal
a four horse team owned by Henry
Rathje, residing near that place was
struck by a Soo engine switching in
the yards, killing one team and badly
injuring the driver, Adam Jobs.
The accident occurred on the main
street of Fingal while
Jobs
was re­
turning to the Rathje farm after
hauling grain to town. The lead team
had just crossed the tracks when the
engine struck it. The grain tank and
wagon were demolished, and the
horses dragged for a hundred yards,
before the engine could be stopped.
Jobs, the driver was thrown from his
seat, his leg broken at the thigh, and
he was otherwise badly bruised.
The lead team broke away and were
captured after running a short dis
tance.
Jobs was brought to Valley City late
yesterday afternoon by Mr iRathje,
and is now under a physician's care
at Platou hospital. Late reports are
that Mr. Jobs is getting along nicely.
Good Advertising By
Bank of Valley City
One of the best advertisements for
Valley City seen for some time is in
the recent edition of the National
©ankers' directory, which is just off
the press. In listing the banks of
North Dakota, the 'Bank of Valley
City is given a prominent place
across the top of the two page map
of the state. The ad. not only men
tions the bank, but the resources of
the city and county, and suggests the
advisability of investments in this
section of the state.
LAND FOR SALE.
Several good farms in the vicinity of
Sanborn for sale cheap. Write A. A.
Canfield, Fargo, N. D. (9-26-3tw)
chance among their multitude of
theories there happened to foe a
sound one, it "was necessary for the
other party to adopt it before the peo
ple were willing to give it a trial.
While trying out new stunts it is a
good idea to have a practiced hand
at the wheel and not a theorist or a
teacher of theories.
The theory that Prof. Wilson now
proposes to the people of North Da
kota is the no tariff theory on grain
from Canada. That's one on the
farmers, but wait-
Again the democratic party 1*111 be
confronted with a condition, not a
theory.
(iFolititeal Advertisement.)
Exclusive UNDERWOOD features make possible the most
important labor-saving systems of modern accounting.
The ever growing demand puts the annual sales of
Underwoods far ahead of those of any other machine
—making necessary the largest typewriter factory
and the largest typewriteroffice building in the world.
Such a demand from business men everywhere is
unquestionable evidence of the practical superiority of
"The Machine You Will Eventually Buy"
UNDERWOOD TYPEWRITER COMPANY, Inc.
625 First Avenue, Fargo, N. D.
vK\I
1
WW*'*'*
0LLE6E
Tlie D. B. C. has built a magnificent
new building (350.000 cubic feet of
space), Is seated with roll top desks,
has 100 typewriters, adding machines,
blllers, money changers, ete. Our
pupils deal with each other and with
elegantly equipped offices, using alu
minum money. Our courses are fas
cinating and practical—pupils like
them. The Northwest has "No other
school like the D. B. C."
Next term begins soon. Wot booklet,
write
r. 1XLAXD WATZXVS, Pres.,
Watklns Blocf Fargo, N. D.
A S
Professional Cards
OR. F. L. WICKS
EYE, EAR, NOSE and THROAT
Glasses Fitted When iNeeessary
Over Siegfried Pharmacy
VALLEY CITY, N. D.
IPhone: Offlce 206-A 'Res. 20643
J. VAN iHOUTEN, M. D.
Physician and Burgeon
Offices in Gray Block
VALLEY OITY, N. D.
THEODORE S. LINDLAND
Attorney and Counsellor at (Law
Offlce in Farmers' and Merchants'
Bank (Building
VALLEY CITY, N. D-.
E O E O N
Attorney-at'Law
VALLEY CITY, N. D.
Res- Fifth Ave.• N.. tPhone 36
E. A. PRAY, M. D.
Physician and Surgeon
Graduate Univ. of Pennsylvania
Offlce in Postofflce Block
Hospital Phone Office IPhone
No. 103 No. 47
DRS. FLATOU & MAC DONALD
Physicians and Surgeons
Office 310 Fifth Avenue South
Next to Rudolf 'Hotel
VALLEY CITY, N. P.
E A A S O N
LAWYERS
Practice in All Courts
Office over Chalfee's Store
HERMAN WINTERER
Attorney and Counsellor at Law
Office in First National Bank Blk.
VALLEY CITY, N. D.
E O S
Physician and Surgeon
Phone iConnections
ORitSKA, N. D.
Offlce Phone, 6 Res. Phone 366
S. A. ZIMMERMAN, M. D.
Physician and 8urgeon
Office, American Nat'l Bank Bldg.
VALLEY CITY, N. D.
Mm

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