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Grand Forks daily herald and the evening times. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1914, March 30, 1914, Image 10

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074404/1914-03-30/ed-1/seq-10/

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CLIMAX TO BE
ATTAINED EARLY
Will be One of the Most Dra
matic in Recent Con
gressional Activities.
\V !.viiliig'ton. .March I!#.—In many
year* ('•ingress Hats not been so ab
sorbed in a legislative issue as it is to
day in the rontroversy over repeal of
loll exemption for American coast
wise fiii|iH passing through the Pana
ma canal The exciting events of last
week which put on record a breach in
ilie soliditary of the democratic, parly
have canned no end of conflicting po
litical predictions to increase the ten
sity of inl.frc.si in the subject, but,
with the existing democratic organiza
tion left out of the situaion it is one
wivus'u will complications.
Will Rival Other Climaxes.
In llip house, opposing leaders in Ihe
tight are setting the stage for the final
struggle, all conceding that the. scene
to attend the closing hours of the de
bate and the tinal roll call will rival
in sensational enthusiasm any legisla
Uve climax in recent years. Speaker
Champ Clark, whose vigorous state
ment against, the cloture rule last
week, drew the curtain on the party
breach, has prepared on epilogue and
the house galleries cannot accommo
date the thousands who will scramble
for seats to hear him deliver it. The
speaker has maintained silence since
his defeat on the cloture rule, when
only" lif.l.y-live
democratic members of
the house followed their recognized
leaders, while some 200 off them stood
by the administration, yielding to
President Wilson's plea ,jf support
thai he inl^lit deal wit.h foreign prob
lems confronting the nation, but. he
wl]J break silence on the main Issue
of ihe controversy Tuesday, closing
M|«? .ii.-n-.g .I.HI V',," '•*.I ''.' '.
CONGRESS AGAH FURtGES MTO
IffAT OT THIS EXEMPTION FIGHT
the debate on behalf of opponents of
toll exemption repeal.
Speech is Guarded.
The speech ha.s been guarded with'
the utmost care, fearful lest some
hint of what the speaker proposes,to
say might llnd Its way into the hands
I of the opposing forces. Clowe friends
of the speaker assert that there will
be no bitterness expressed, no hark
ing hack to political imbroglios and
ino reflections cast on the opinions of
others as to the policies involved.
They predict that he proposes to
discuss the merits of the issue
On the other hand, some democrats
who have had their ears closely to the
ground in the last few day-.*, hint that
the speaker may surprise his frieiule
and arouse his adversaries.
Wilson Doesn't Comment.
As to the party strife that has been
precipitated by this unusual interna
tional complication. President Wllejon
has made no comment, and so far as
known contemplates making none. He
mode his plea to the congress and
awaits results. Close advisers of the
1
Ora:ical strife over the repca.1 was
renewed today in both the senate and
limine, in the. latter general debate be
ing resumed on the Sims bill leading
11) to Hie final vote in that branch of
ibo congress probably late Tuesday
nisht or Wednesday. In the senate
'discussion will resolve around one of
:lic many side issues that have arisen,
'-Vnalor James Hamilton Lewis pro
posing io discuss a resolution and bill
he hat introduced to follow repeal as
a sort of balm to ihe wounds of his
party members who have thus far op.
posed the president in his plan for uP
holding the honor of the nation.
Lewis llase Scheme.
.Senator Lewis' measure would give
ilie president authority to suspend
mils whenever, in his opinion, he
iiould deem it in the public interest to
tlu so. The Illinois senator will cite a
i.nng series of precedents upon which
he bases the right of congress to ex
tend such authority to the chief exe
cutive without offending: any foreign
nation, or violating any treaty agree
ment. As againet the proposal of
Senator Lewis. the minority leader,
Senator Gallinger, will urge a resolu
tion lie introduced last week which
would express It as the sense of
Americans that congress has the right
io do as it pleases with respect to
American shipping through the Pana
ma canal.
president insist, however, that he
bears no personal nor political ill will
toward the leaders of the party who
have differed with him in this crisis
jthat he entertains no thought of hold
ing a political grudge and that any
idea, such its has been intimated from
imany sources in the last few days, that
lie would attempt to have politically
{punished the party leaders who oppose
•hiin. is farthest from his thoughts.
While rumors of protracted party
warfare are. being widely circulated,
the president, it is declared, is hop
ling that congress will repeal the tolls
Issue, confident that it will do so. and
proposes that "finis" shall be written
to the controversy when that is done.
regardless of the circumstances that
attended it.
Breakers Ahead.
Breakers are ahead for the repeal,
however, despite the situation in the
house, where it is generally conceded
the fight already has been fought and
won. The only uncertainty in the
minds of the members of congress as
to the outcome of the repeal in the
house is the si se of the majority it
will receive.
The. vote on the. previous question
on the cloture rule was won by the
president's adherents by a majority of
thirty-one, Estimates of the. majority
Ion the. repeal vary from thirty-five to
seventy-five, according 10 the point of
view. Hut the senate is jet to be
.reckoned with. There no cloture rule
limit debate can be ordered and it may
be weeks before Ihe .|iiestion is dis
posed of. Senator O'Oorman, who
will lead the Held on the repeal with
in the party ranks, has said senators
who propose to vote for the repeal
I have, told him they did not expect
vote for six weeks. Senator Owen and
other democratic champions of the
president's cause declare that the de-
!lay
Ilitlg
will serve no useful purpose, and
they hope io have the committee on
inter-oceanic canals, of which Senator
("'(.loriiian is chairman, take up the
Sims' bill as soon as it comes from the
house. The committee Is closely di
vided on the issue.
Just now a. vote on the bill -will
|eventuate is uncertain, leaders on both
sides claiming a majority. At pres
,ent, unless some members of the com
mittee should announce a change of
view. It appears that opponents of the
repeal might have a. majority of one
in the committee. Should the majori
ty decide to report it adversely, there
.will be a inorlty report, upon which
Ihe senate would be.forced to take a
vote. This, of course, would deter
,mlne the is*ue as decisively as action
first on a favorable majority report,
Committee Period Vncortaln.
There are other bills pertaining to
Children and Music~HTwoulK
without them* would it? And think of it, children and
no musical instrument---doesn't it always make you sad
to go into such a home?
There is nothing children like better than to sing and play. They are never
tired for that. Gather them around vou in the evening. Play & tew pieces=on
the Pian© qr Player-piano. Let them play themselves and teach 'them t»? sing
.^Qtbing will cement the home ties like music. Nothing will keep the little folks
^tMn the uplifting atmosphere of the.hoine so well as music. I
therejs really no excuse you can make to your children.when you can
on such easy terms as we have always offered. A visit to this store
conyince you that therejsj|ajly only^one place where you should purchase a
-.piancfe. I*et us show you a *j
*t Concord or a Cable-Nelson
the issue before the canals commit
tee and no one will predict how long
Hie committee will hold the subject
under, consideration.. SeAator Chilton'
has a bill, which instead of directly
repealing the tolls exemption clause,
would put it up to the president to
determine what ships should Pay
tolls. 'Then there is Senator Lewis'
bill empowering the president to sus
pend tolls, and another measure in
troduced by Senator Heed would re
peal the toll exemption and then grant
to foreign ships the right to compete
with American coastwise shipping, a
bill designated, as the senator put it,
"to break up any American coastwise
shipping monopoly that may exist."
What the committee and the senate
will do with all these measures re
mains to be seen, and how determined
opponents of the repeal to delay the
etui of the controversy also is un
known. Rumors of attempts.to fili
buster already are being heard, how-,
ever, and filibustering in the senate Is
not difllcult of accomplishment.
Other features In Eclipse.
Other legislation before congress Is
just now in practical eclipse, save ap
propriation and calendar bills of less
er importance. The senate interstate
commerce sub-coinmittee continues at
work on anti-trust bills. In the ho^use
the interstato commerce committee,
which already has voted for the Cov
ington interstate trade commission
bill, and has still to act on the propo
sition for federal control of railway
capita ligation, is actively engaged on
the repeal bill, to the exclusion of all
other business, so that nothing is be
fore the committee for this week-
The house committee on the judici
ary has had its calendar upset by the
cases involving charges against Rep
resentative McDermott of Illinois and
Judge Speer of Oeorgia and Wright of
the District of Columbia.
All time for filing briefs in the Mc
Dermott case have expired and the
judiciary full committee may act on
the McDermott case Tuesday, voting
on a report from the sub-committee
which proposes censure of McDermott
and the National Association of
Manufacturers and its officials.
The house has a number of appro
priation bills ready to consider as
soon as it runs out of other business,
including the naval appropriation
which has the right of
It's curious how a man likes to
hear some other fellow's cash register
jingle Instead of trying to save up
and get one of his own.
A bachelor never knows whether to
call a. baby he or she, so he says "It,"
COMB SAGE TEA
INTO GRAY HAIR
Ladies! Try This! (Darkens Beau
tifully and Nobody Can Tell—
Brings Backs Its Gloss and
Thickness.
Common garden sage brewed Into a
heavy tea, with sulphur and alcohol
added, will turn gray, .streaked and
faded hair beautifully dark and lux
uriant remove every bit of dandruff,
stop scalp Itching and falling hair.
Mixing the Sage Tea. and Sulphur re
cipe at home, though. Is troublesome.
An easier way is to get the ready-to
use tonic, costing about 50. cents a
large bottle at drug stores, known as
"Wyeth'n Sage and Sulphur Hair
Remedy," thus avoiding a lot of tiiuss.
While wispy, gray, faded hair is not
sinful, we all desire to retain our
youthful appearance and attractive
ness. By darekning your hair with
Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur, no one
can tell, .because It doea It so natur
ally, so evenly. You Just dampen a
sponge or soft brush with It and draw
this through your hair, taking one
small strand at a time by morning all
gray hairs have disappeared. After
another application or two your hair
becomes beautifully dark, glossy, soft
and luxuriant and you appear years
younger.—Advertisement.
". Is
1
•'*.
mm
wwm*
I
Yours
A
Home
Without
Music
not be much
r'
,9
Edgeley Substation Gives
Results of its Experi
ments in Bulletin.
Kdgclcy, N. D., March 30.—The
Kdgeley substation was started in
1903. Kxpcriinental work has been
carried on during the: .eleven- years.
The results have been put out in re
ports. 'The report for 1913 now
ready for distribution.
A good many tree shave.ben plant
ed. These have made a satisfactory
growth.' Such fruits as currants,
gooseberries, Juneberries and plums
have done very well.
The wheat in 1913 went 2t bushels
oil lund plowed about September I,
only 11 1-3 bushels on laud plowed
early in October, 11 1-2 bushels
where the plowing was done about
November 1, and on spring plowing,
18.3 bushels. This emphasizes tliu
value of the early fall plowing.
The highest yields of wheat secur
ed at Kdgeley in 1913 was 30.6 bush
els with Power's Selected and Girka.
These both outylelded the durums,
though the durums have usually giv
en the highest yields
One of the often debated questions
is the value of subsoiling. In 1912
the results were in favor of it but in
1913 the. subsoiled plats gave the
smaller yield. When the two years
are.' averaged up they just about bal
ance.
This report should be especially
valuable to those who arc managing
farms in the southeastern part of the
state. Copies can be secured from
the North Dakota experiment station,
I agricultural college, N. D.
RITCHIE OFFERED $10,000.
To Meet Johnny Dundee in a .Ten
Round Go at tov York.
Detroit, March 80.—Scotty Mon
teith, manager of 'Johnny Dundee,
the New York boxer, is here with an
offer to Willie Ritchie from Mc
Mahon's club at Sea Beach, .. Coney
Island, to guarantee the champion
$10,000 for a match with Dundee.
Dundee is in Detroit to light Patscy
Drouillard Wednesday night.
"I am agreeable," said' Dundee,
"and won't say a word about- the
weight. I feel I can beat Ritchie .to
the satisfaction of every -man who
sees the bout."
Monteith says McMahon will stage
the bout at Ritchie's convenience,
some time in May preferred.
"If Ritchie is in it for the money
here is a fine chance for him, as ho
will meet a. boy a dozen pounds
lighter than lie is," rchiarUcd Mon
teith.
Times-Herald Wants.
SIGNS
FOR SIGNS OF ALL. DESCRIPTION
see us: expert auto finishing. The Da
kota Sign Co., 3rd ft Belmont N.W. 661
SITUATIONS WANTED
A YOUNG MAN WITH SEVERAL
years experience denizes a position
running general store knows the
business understands Scandinavian
language. 755 TlmeS-Herald.'
A MTDDJ.E AGED LADY WANTS Posi
tion as housekeeper on farm for wi
dower or bachelor. Address Mrs.
Marie Anderson, 53 E Spring St., Chip
pewa F%lls. Wis.
POSITION WANTED BY REGISTERED
pharmacist: Scandinavian, single 16
years experience: best of references.
Address 748 Times-Herald.
WANTED—WORK OF" ANT KIND IN
(fraud
Forks, by a married 'man. Ad­
dress 7-57 Times-Herald.
RELIABLE MAN WITH EXPERIENCE
wishes position ns' automobile repair
man can furnish best of reference
Address 756 Times-Herald.
WANT 13D—POSITION AS MEAT CUT
ter 22 years experience. Address 237
Markly Ave. North. Thief River Falls,
Minn.
SITUATION WANTED—BIT AN ALL
around butcher. Married man. Ad
dress 747 Times-llernld.
AV ANTED—POSITION RUNNING GAS
tractor. Can furnish best ot .refer
ences. Address 751 Times-Herald.
WANTED—POSITION ON FARM BY
manjind wfle by the year. Address
752 Times-Herald.
WANTED—POSITION ON .FARM BY
two young men. Address' 7.50 Times-
Herald..
SCAVENGER WORK OF ALL KINDS
done, vaults cleaned-, T-S. plionu'793-L
STENOGRAPHERS.
MABEL BREN'DEN, PUBLIC STENOG
rapher. Can take dictation where pre
ferred., Underwood T.'W. Co. 11 S. .3rd
STORAGE
WANTED—AUTO STORAGE: SOUTH
end near Eighth and Walnut. Phone
1729-L N. W.
Household Goods packed and stored.
Panovltz Furniture and. Carpet Co.
TOBACCO AND CIGARS.
TOBACCO AND CIGARS
can always .beldepshded on At
F. KNIPPLINO 8. SBLONS
Soda Fountain th~ ft De Men,
TRANSFERS
MVW
i.I9AT MAKES A SPECIALTY OF
handling heavy freight, -household
goods, -pianos, safeii, drayags. Urn
storage warehouse In.-./(yjnnection.
Phone-N. W. 8*7: T-S. 817-U «.-
TYPEWRITERS.
BARGAINS IN TtHBUItT AND USED
typewriters all makes low prices
easy^terms. Remington Typewriter
Co.. :Odd Fellow Blk* City,
UNDERTAKER
H- A8HLEY B02 DE MEKS AVE.
Ambulance In cnonactUn. Khones jl-L
WOOD AND (X)At.
GRAND
4*'
WANTiBjb
W*NTED-rCL«
'WHI
msm
V-r
to.'mtca
«n thefeiSSu.^
MARCH 30, 1914.
Market Quotations.
S
Market quotations furnished by C.
E. Lewis & Co.
MAY WHEAT.
Chi. Minn. DuL
Open ... .93—92i .90J-1 .911
High ... .93 .901 91
lx»w .. 92* .89* .91
Close ... .92* 89* ,91b
JULY WHEAT.
Chi. Minn. Out.
Open ... .884-4 91i 92K
High .. ... .884 .911 92U
I.OW 874 .91 .92
Close .. ... .S74-g 91b .92
SEPTEMBER WHEAT.
Chi. Minn.
Open
High
Low
Close
.88
88
861-87
.'86i-87
.88|
.88}
874
.874
ST. LOUIS.
May. July.
Open
Close
Sept.
.86
.854
... .924 -.854
... .911 .848
KANSAS CTTV.
Chi. Minn.
... .86 .83-821
.85-i .824
Open
Close
Dul
.821
.824
NEW YORK.
May. July.
Open
Close
Sept.
...1.011
..^l.OOi
Open
Close
WINNIPEG.
May. Jiilv,
•92i .93i
.91| .931 .87}
Oct.
CHICAGO CORN.
Open
May. July- Sept.
Open .68 a .69-681 •68J-|
High .'. .683 .69-4 .681
Low .68 .682 .68}
Close 684-1 •684-1 .68|-4
CHICAGO OATS.
Open
May. July. Sept.
Open 394-1 .40 .384
High .... .394 .40 .384
Low .'. .... .39 .391 38)
Close -. .. .39-4 •39J-J .38}
CHICAGO I'ORK.
... May, July.
Open 21.05 21.22
High 21.05 21.22
Low 20.75 20. S7
Close 20.SO 20.90
MINNEAPOLIS.
Puts, May S9-J, 89.
Calls, May Sftg-J.
MINNEAPOLIS CASH WHEAT.
No. 1 hard 92} @931
No. .1 northern 901(3)921
Arrive 90I®911
Choice [email protected]|
No. 2 northern 881#90|
No. ,1 northern [email protected]
No. 1 duruni and arrive. ..88
No. 2 durum and arrive. 86
No. 3 yellow corn 62 @62i
No. 4 corn 59 @61
No. white oats .36$
Arrive ,36t
No, 3 oats .33 ®."!41
Barley, fancy 53 ®55
Barley, good 47 ®S-8.
Barley, poor .43 @67
Flax arid arrive v.....
1. 5ft l.
5SJ
Rye and arrive,....
DIJLVTH CASH. CLOSE.
No. .J, hard ,?2
No 1. northern 91,.
No. 2 northern 89
Oats -cash 36b
Tlye .. ,.r, @57
No. 1 durum 881
jNo. 2 durum .861
July durum ,'90i
May durum 891
Flax,, cash on' track. .. 1 5S1'
IHJLUTU FLAX.
May. July- Sept.
Open .. .61 62R
Close .1.591 1
'-1 ,''i" ... $h'!- 1 1
ci8
WINNIPEG CLOSE.
No. 1 northern 89)
No. 2 northern 87J
No- 3 northern 86|
No. 4 northern .-S2J
No. 5 northern 81
No. 6 northern 7 6
Feed 71
No. 2 oats 35
No. 3 oats .344
Oats, July 374
Oats. May .36}
Flax, May '.i .40}
Flax, juiy
.1
43}.
RAXOE OP PRICES..
Yesterday's Quotations as Reported
By tlic Associated Press.
1
Cattle.
St.-Paul, March 28.—Cattle receipts
2'00 .killers .steady steers, [email protected]
"8.25 cows and heifers, [email protected]
calves steady, [email protected] stockers
and feeders steady, [email protected]
Chicago/ March 28.—Cattle receipts
-200 steady beeves, [email protected]
Texas' steers, [email protected] western
steers, $7.00(8)8.20 stockers- and
feeders, [email protected] cows and heifers
[email protected] calves, [email protected]
Hogs.
St. Paul, March 28.—Hog receipts
1.300 steady range, [email protected]
bulk, $8.30®S.35.
Chicago, March 28.—Hog receipts
7,000 strong and 5 cents higher
bulk of sales, $8.55.® &6S .- light,
$8.45 8.70: mixed, [email protected]
heavy. $8.25(g) 8.70 rough. .$8.25
S.40 pigs, [email protected]
Sheop.
St. Paul, March 2«.—Sheep receipts
100.:.- steady lambs,-
too
:$5'[email protected]
wethers, $5.00 @6.00 ewes, $3.50®
5.60.
Chicago, March '28.—Sheep receipts
4,0001 nominally steady: native, $5:25
i®6.75 western, $54o®6.80^ yeatr
lings,— $6.25-®7.504.1anis, ..native,
[email protected]:25 western, $7.25® g'.4D.
GOSSIP.
Chicago I-nter-Ocean- says: Outside
speculation in wheat the past week
was very small and the market drifted
almlefesly. Activity in, corn ''caused' a
number. of-.'operators,., who-s generally
are., in fevideqee In.
:tiie'whe*£.
pit 'W
transfer their operations to the coarse
grain and while bears were unable to
make a little headway due to general,
rains over the greater part:'of the belt,
their,.success wap trifling. Cash salea
wheat 25,000. bushels, corn 120,000
bushels, oats 120,000 bushels.
Liverpool weekly stocks wheat 2,
^16,000 bushels increase 201,000 'bush
els. Corn 1,981,000 bushels, decrea**
287,000 bushels.
MOTORBOATSUBED.
Antweii, .Marciii $0.—Beiflah
government ia.'sending three «HBa)l(MI
sliding, ^ptpsriboa^s to
rlv«r traffic.. These .boats are. 8.7,iteet
long aadjikve draught of only 27
inehei They, ait driven by in^tori'of
horse power tMI Ktve
"v \fSfl y^Vn
"&%*£*.
WEAKNESS TIE
HASET FEATURE
Wheat Prices Ruled Within
Narrow Margin Dur
ing the Session.
Minneapolis, March 30.—The wheat
market has ruled 'weak and closing
prices are a cent lower than the prev
ious close. Export business was lack
ing and considerable precipitation was
reported In the winter wheat belt ov
er Sunday.
Favorable weather over the winter
wheat belt and crop reports continue
-very optimistic.
One of the Chicago Statisticians es
timates the winter wheat crop above
600,000,000 bushels.
Last year's crop of winter wheat
was 523,000,000 bushels which was
the largest crop ever raised !n the
United States.
Liverpool cables closed 1-4 to 3-4
lower. The visible.supply in the Unit
ed States showed a decrease of 1,172,
000 bushels for the past week.
BROOMUAIjIi CABLES.
Liverpool Light American ship
ments and pia'r'ticularly to Liverpool
offset the easier cables on Saturday
and opening values were unchanged
to 1-8 lower. Following the opening
there .was.
a disposition for profits and
values declined 1-8 to 1-4 with the
pressure in distant months. American
winter crop prospects- cheaper offers
of American winters together with fa
vorable weather reports from Russia
and pressure in corn helped the de
cline. It is expected here that tlie
government report will be bearish. At
1:30 p. m. the undertone was easy and
market 1-8 to 1-4 lower.
Corn opened 1-4 lower and later
further declined 1-8 with undertone
easy. Finte weather in the Argentine
and small inquiry for new plate
steamers with freer.Danubian. offers
helped to stimulate profit taking. At
1:30 p. m.- prices were 3-8 lower-for
July.
LIVERPOOL.
Opcnin—Wheat 1-8 lower. Corn
unchanged.
1:30 p. in.—Wheat 1-8. to 3-8 low
er. Corn 1-8 lower.
3:18 p. m.—Wheat 1-8 to 3-8 low
er. Corn 1-4 lower.
Close—Wheat 1-4 to 1-2 lower.
Corn unchanged.
I
bri «rtin
ary speed of. ll mllM fai^. hour. The.
mts can e«Ush bfar load at, elgnt
tons and «ccommodate eightpaMea
gers In an AJiy^Cablh Milted the.
tropics. Thct 'jirieomruod^tlpns art
tnush' Hls«^iU0Mi-x)f «t P.uiimah
"th* tMt ««rvle0 for freight,- mail*
ai?d psssen|rer», will, started
'msi
"*vVf
_r-^V jf-1-
Grand Forks Markets
MAN OR "SISSY"?
March 30. -V
WBML
No.
No.
No.
No.
Rejected
No grade
northern •..
northern
northern.
northern ......
No.- 2.
iNo. 3
No. 3
No. 4
Rejected
No grade
white
white
No. 1 turkeys, per lb.
No. 1 ducks, per lb....
No. 1 geese, per lb...
Chicken?, per lb...
Fresh eggs, per doz
Wheat.
Corn..
Oats .,
Wheat.
Oats.
Wheat'.
Barley.
Klax. .,
HIS inorninK's mail brings mc a
startling letter—startling because
it Is written by a man. It would
be ordinary if from a woman.-
SETTER ADVERTISE,
And yet I believe, it expresses the
thoughts and "feelings of- a great,
niaiiy level headed and pure tiiiud-.
home and the children with which they may have been blefsed. r
Here is n. man who .evidently believes that, men have martial duties'n*
well as women: who does not consider himself dishonored by duing what,
has been contemptuously referred to as "woman's work. ", who-doesn't ex
pect a woman to bear all the loneliness watiug for the other marital part
ner to "turn up who recognizes human rights regardless of sex (even
in the case of his own wife!)
Many who read this letter will-scoff at it—call the man a "sissy" or a
"little off." I know men (and some women) who wouldn't 'consider' liiui
a. real man. Yet what is real manliness"
If do a in
over the .middle ela^s, everydav
people you know—tiie salt ot the
oarth, who- never invade a divbre*
court, who liv«! for each l)tHoi- ami
whose ambition is centered iii t.h"o
Isn't
share burdens, to be just and also kind? ..But here is the .letter:
"I thought you would like to know how manage an entire ,rtat.—
alone. This after reading your article about the husband who cleaned'•
house for his wife.
"Jly wife—dearest and best little woman there ever tvas—after 'keep
ing house for me eight years, decided she could be of more use'lo nie and
do more good to suffering humanity by becoming a trained n-ursp. -During
the eight years she had given all her spare time to nursing her su'k
friends or such charity cases as she heard of. .1 never stood in her, lyay,
though it often took all our spare cash. When she-began to Htudv to enter
a hospital training school I helped her all I could, studying the same les
sons and quizzing, her,,for. her tests.
"Now she has been in training-eighteen months, while keep house
all by my lonely, and I assure you my flat is as neat and-dustless as ativi
I work during the day away from home,-from 7:30 a. m. to 6 p. m., and
get my own breakfast arid. sitp'per at home. Hcsidec, I belong to two
societies. Still, I And time to do the housework and do it well-^even
moved from one" flat to another without asking help from my wife *r dii
outsider, and 'settled' the new flat. -Yes—some job.
"And I'm contented. Why shouldn't I be'.' Why should 1 expect inv
wife to wait on me hand and foot? Why should I expect her ttf be cooped
up in a .flat all. day waiting my return in the evening? Why should I ex
pect her to stunt her spiritual a.nd mental grpwtif—be a 'lpv*-slave'-ti me
What would she get out of it and what would she become?
"And see what it does for me. Develops my character, puts me on mv.
mettle in resisting temptations'in this my temporary "bachelor life.' It
takes character to come home \vith a smiling fare when know there' is
no one to greet me, no warm supper waiting. But I can sing while the
potatoes arc boiling!
"To live for others is the cvre for all. this divorce and sex trouble
Would I hurt' my wife's feeling by going with some other woman?
body and happy mind are, better thally, morally or.spiritual'-- healthv
guess not! It wouldn't pay—physican all the sex pleasure in the world.
"There are no two.people who love eaeh'other better than,we do. Hav
ing no children, we make up for it, as it were, in loving each other so
much more.—J. F."
it. strength to do right, to
v.-'lv. .' (By Somebody.) |.,V
Breathes there a man with soul so dead
He:never to Himself hath said:
"My/trade of Wte is getting'IjiadT
I'll try another two-^age adi"
mark..hiniv veell, *!^,
For .-liiui no?bank account siia.il' swell,
Hoi angels wat^clrthfe golden stair.
To welcpiiie home the miUipnaire,
TJieinaiifwho never asks for trade
By local line or ad. displayed,
Qares more for rest than worldlygairi
And -patronage but gives him pain.
Tread lightly, friends' let no rudevsound
Disturb'his solitude profound
Here let him live in c^lm repose Si?
Unsought except by m«n he o^s|j||^©.:L
And when he dies, go plant him deep
That naughit may break his dreamless sleeps
.Whcrg np^rudfe clamor: mayiyispei',it^\: i*',^:i.^.4^^
The quiet that he loved so well. %&>
Ww Anrl wh#n I,«n... i4.
•yfc
83
.82
.80
.76
,6a
.66
Barleyi
451b bright
:43tb bright
41 lb bright
37 lt bright
.36
.34
.32
.29
Rye.
.44
.41
Oats.
.28
.27
2(i
Flux
No. 1 ...
No. 3
Rejected
No grade
4S

•»0
35
... 1'
.. 1.
1.
Cash prices paid!- to producers.
Grand ForKa.
Vegetables.
White potatoes, per bushel..'....
Early Ohio potatoes, per bushel..
Onions, per cwt 2.
Cabbage, per cwt 1-75
Beets, per cwt.........
Carrots, per cwt.
Rutabagas, per cwt 1.
-at
33
50
25
,80
.90
00
HU.
Timothy, per toti '........ .$11.
Upland, per ton 8,
Midland, per ton 6.
06
00
00
Dressed Poultry.

14
11
11
,17
VUS RECEIVED.
Chicago.
Today. Cont. Est. Ago.
17 7 16 54
.. ... 64 1 67 87
8 9 1 5 8 9 8 9
Winnipeg.
•kt
Year
Today. Year Ago.'
1 2 9 1 9 6
•. 87. 47
Minneapolis.
5 4 5 5 4 2
6 3
4 8
WORLD'S SHIPMENTS.
Wheat 10.SS2,000, lust week, 11,
968,000 bushels year ago, 1:1,520,000.
Corn, 3.624,000 last week, 1,558,000.
year ago, 430S,000 bushels.
Argentine—The international insti
tute at Rome estimates corn crop at
348,500,000 bushels.
Berlin—Wheat unchanged.
Budapest—2 1-8 higher.
13- W. Snow's report on condition of
crop, 91.7 on winter killing of conse
quence. Indications above 600,000,000
bushels winter, wheat. Last year's
crop was 523,000,000 bushels and the'
largest crop ever raised in the United
States.
4
122
42
1 a
1 /,
0
1*
4
1
mm'
3}r,
'1™
1
Mi
nil!Si

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