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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 02, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1914-09-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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EVENING
EDITION
VOL. 9, NO: 208.
Many Exploding Missies are
Dropped to Earth by
Operators.
BELGIANS OPEN
FIRE ON VISITOR
Believed That Ship Was Damaged,
Dropping Eight or Nine Bombs Al­
most Simultaneously in Attempt to
Insure Its Escape.
and it Is believed' that she was hit.
The Zeppelin retired In a southerly
direction, dropping eight or nine
bombs at one time, seemingly to fa
cilitate her escape.
Paris, Sept. 2.—Last night another
German aviator appeared over Paris,
dropping several bombs in streets,
none of which did any damage.
The almost dally visitations of the
German air machine is resulting in
creating a remarkable feeling on the
part of the Parisians, who are thor
oughly alarmed over the attacks
Washington, Sept. 2.-—Ambassador
Herrlck today transmitted to the
state department the protest of a
committee of Americans in Paris
against the dropping of bombs by
German airships. The ambassador
made no protest of his own accord,
simply stating it the conviction of
Americans that the incident is a vio
lation of the Hague convention.
f08 U. S. SENATE
Made Republican Candidate
in the Wisconsin Pri
maries Yesterday.
Milwaukee, Sept. 2.—The nomina
tions of Governor McGovern, repub
lican, and Paul Husting, democrat,
for United States senator, and Eman
uel Philipp, republican, for governor,
seem assured from returns of the pri
mary election.
Both John Karel and John Aylward
claim the democratic gubernatorial
nomination.
JAPAN LANDS BIG
EORCEJN (HNA
Said That Action is in Viola
tion of the Empire's"
Neutrality.
.: Peking, Sept 2.—Japan landed be
tween 10,000 and 15,000 troops from
•i: 1» transports at Iungkow, the newly
-opened port about 100 miles north of
Tsing-tau. This is declared here to
A% i?have been done in violation of Chi-
m'm
neutrality.
THB WBATHKR.
SifeS*
.north Dakota: Fair tonight
in west
W
IS MM AMP
TORN BY
Ann park
liondon, Sept. 2.—A dispatch to the
Reuter Telegram company from Ant
werp says that a Zeppelin airship,
passing over the city this morning,
dropped, several bombs. One struck
the fall'«KW',-~doing' tri*-- damage, hu&iL^
other's seriously damaged ten houses.7771lw
addition to those—striking the
houses, Ave bombs tore great holes till'
,!!h
-.
BULLETINS
Washington, Sept. a.—Nelson
O'Shaughneesy, former charge at
Mexico City, has been ordered to
Vienna to act as extra secretary
to the American embassy.
Washington, Sept. 2.—No war
ships are to be taken from Mex
ican waters at present. The
transfer of the of the
Atlantic fleet from Badger to
Fletcher has been postponed un
til next month.
Washington, Sept. a.—The ad
ministration government mer
chant marine bill was ordered
favorably reported by the house
merchant marine committee.
Chairman Alexander plans the
bill to be taken up in the house
next week.
TURKEY DECLARES WAR?
New York, Sept. a.—Dow,
Jones & Co. published the follow
ing on the news ticker:
"London, Sept. SJ.—'Unconfirm
ed reports are current here that
Turkey has declared war on Rus
sia. Communication with Con
stantinople has been cut off for
three days, and the Turkish am
bassador stated he had no way of
telling when he would hear from
his government again."
MARSHALL DID IT.
Washington, Sept. a.—Vice
President Marshall authorized the
published ttatement that Wood
^Wilson hp candidate
for re-election. Tumulty said the
White House" knecr nothlng of the
ENGLISH CAPTURE CANNON.
Paris, Sept. 2.—The following
statement was given -oat official
ly: "A German cavalry corps,
marching toward the forest of
Compeigne, on the left wing of
the allied forces, engaged the
English Tuesday, September 1.
The English captured ten can
non."
RUMORED CAPTURED AGAIN.
New York, Sept 2.—Sir Court
ney Bennett, British consul geneg.
al here, announced that he Is in
formed from trustworthy source
that the North German Lloyd
Liner Kron Prim Wilhelm was
captured In nearby waters by
British cruisers, and is being
taken to Bermuda.
FUTliOF
HOT IS VOICED
Clark W. Kelly of Devils
Lake Says There is No
Antagonistic Movement
Devils Lake, N. D., Sept 2.—"There
is absolutely nothing to it."
This is the declaration of Clark W.
Kelley, agricultural college trustee,
with reference to the charge that has
been made than an effort Is being
made to "get" President J. H. Worst,
Prof. H. L. Bolley and Prof. E. P.
Ladd. Mr. Kelley is probably one of
the most prominent members of the
entire board, having served as presi
dent under the Burke administration.
"Every member of the board of
trustees of the college Is a personal
friend of these men and there is no
occasion for the vague charges which
have been made. There is not a man
on the entire board but who is giving
his very best effort* toward providing
North Dakota with a college of agri
culture of which she can feel proud.
"Thomas Cooper, who was made
head of the government experiment
station has accomplished a wonder
ful .work. It should be thoroughly
understood that In. every other state
in the union the agricultural college
and the government experiment sta
tion have been operand under en
tirely separate heads, but of course
co-operating. The board deemed tt
for the best Interests of both institu
tions to put a man at theheadof the
experiment station.
"North Dakota is very fortunate lto
having Mr. Cooper, who has been of*
fered much better positions with the
government, with several railroads,
even a foreign government bidding for
his services.
"The trustees assumed not a, dollar
of indebtedness from the better farm
ing association wtileh had not been
pledged with the varioiis counties.
iderMr. Cooper the federal, govern
ant has opened' the strings of the
treasury and funds which have never
before been available have been ten
dered North DakQta."
A board meeting will be Mid in the
near future at wfiieh'lt Is likely the
reoent charges will be threshed out
Ytfull Safeguarti
iSesHn
aints
Of MSURANCE
RATES
Taylor Doesn't Believe in
Rate Making, But in
Strict Supervision.
Heavy Losses in Latter Part of July
Reduce Percentage Employment
of Actuary Believed Essential to
Proper Conduct of the Office,
Bismarck, N. D.. Sept. 2.—Matters
of profound importance to the insur
ing public as well as to insurance
companies are discussed in the annual
report of the Insurance department
which Commissioner w. C. Taylor has
flled with Governor Hann. In view
of the certainty that the forthcoming
legislative assembly will have to deal
with the subject of the regulation or
control of fire Insurance rates in this
state, the comments of Commissioner
Taylor are especially pertinent. Aft
er calling attention to the large num
ber of complaints that reached the de
partment during the year, Mr. Taylor
says
Urges Rate Control.
"That lire insurance rates should
be made toy the state is, to my mind,
quite out of question. 'It can't be
•done.' The necessary data, experi
ence, machinery and technical knowl
edge are not available- Nor is it desir
able that rates should be 'made' by
the state that is not a state function.
But fire insurance rates might well be
regulated, Juet as railroad rates are
supervised .and regulated by
st&te
and'
inter-state commissions. I think there
should be some official or 'board or
commission .to whom inquiries and
complaints could be referred and be
fore whom a full hearing of the mat
ters in issue could be had. I
trust that you will give careful con
sideration to. this subject in your next
message to the legislature.
Wants An Actuary.
Commissioner Taylor strongly urges
the governor to recommend legislative
authority for the appointment of an
actuary, claiming that "the need of
the assistance of one who Is skilled in
actuari&l science and In the principles
of life insurance has long been felt
by this department." As indicating
the need of such assistance and by
way of showing the rapid develop
ment of the Insurance business in
North Dakota, Commissioner Taylor
invites attention to the fact that the
receipts of his department In 1904
were $65,677 in 1909 they were $118,
270, while last year's receipts amount
ed to $165,764. In other words, the
annual receipts of the department had
increased more than one hundred
thousand dollars in the last ten-year
period.
Hall Insurance Payments.
Referring to the state hail insur
ance department, which is under the
management of the commissioner of
insurance, Mr. Taylor "very much re
grets having to report that the hail
deportment will this year be unable to
pay its. losses in full/' Earlier in the
season the outlook was most favor
able, but heavy losses were sustained
in August, so that it is expected that
adjustments will fee made on the basis
6f 70 to 80 per cent
Calling attention to the fact that
North Dakota is the only state in the
union whioh engages directly in the
business of hail Insurance, Mr. Taylor
says "the experiment bas been watch
ed with Interest—sympathetic, cynical
or antagonistic, according to the view
point Of the observer." During the
first three yeans 1
oases were paid, on
the basis of 70, 55 and 88 peir cent
respectively, and it is claimed that
this was by no means an unfavorable
showing in view of the fact that rates
charged by the state are very much
lower than those charged by the
stock companies. The commissioner
Is convinced, however, that all losses
could have been paid In full if a large
number of policies had been issued
and the risk widely distributed over
the state.
Up to Growers.
Failure of the grain growers to
mere generally avail themselves of
the 'benefits of state hail Insurance is
said to be due to lack of proper so
licitation the requirement that cash
must accompany the application
doitbt as to the success of the venture
antagonism to state Insurance, on the
ground that the scheme is chimerical
and .socialistic. In message to the
legislature, Commissioner Taylor will
call attention to the system of com
pulsory hall Insurance in' vogue In the
province of Saskatechewan, Canada.
HOMELESS BEING
PROVIDED KEEP
Pari*. Sept. 2.—The decision of the
military authorities to clear the sons
of forts around Paris does not affect
the xone immediately surrounding the
old fortifications of the city .It only
applies to detached forts such as those
at Mont Valerlen, Iesy and others.*
Under this decision all- the buildings
and small structures of no great value
surrounding .the forts: will be pulled
down. ,vSteps have been taken to pro
Vide shelter for all homeless persons.
NORTH W DAKOTA** GREATEST NEWSPAPER
GRAND FORKS, N. DH TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 2, 1914.
I#l
The ^eil created by censorship over the events
transpiring in France, was momentarily lifted today.
It shows the allies battling desperately to prevent the
success of German assaults on Upper Oise, less than
fifty miles from Paris.
RUSSIA FRANKLY CONFESSES BIG LOSS.
On the eastern war stage, Russia, frankly con
fesses to disaster to two big army corps, but elsewhere
the Russian arms seemed to have triumphed. Galicia
has been successfully invaded, and Lemberg soon will
be evacuated.
AUSTRIAN MENACE NEAR AN END.
If this is true, the Austrian menace to Russian Po
land will end, Russian forces can begin to converge
for the march on Berlin, the Russian objective in north
Galicia apparently being Koenigshutte, whence the
Russians c^t march on Berlin via Breslau.
^N DESPERATE BATTLE.
On Upper Oise, the British are fighting desperate
ly *to .prevent the Germans from securing one of the
most direct route to Paris, news of this battle reaching
here from two different sources, being the first definite
information since the end of the battle of Mons. The
battle raged Sunday and Monday and by sheer weight
of numbers the Germans secured slight advance.
ADVANCE WILL INCREASE IN DIFFICULTY.
Military experts point out that from the present
position on the Upper Oise river, the German advance
will become increasingly difficult, owing to natural fea
tures of the country, as well as artificial defenses that
will have to be encountered. It is becoming evident
that along the western lines the allies are playing for
time in the hope that the German assault will become
exhausted.
GERMANY PLAYING FOR ITALY'S AID.
On the diplomatic side, Germany is making re
newed efforts to bring Italy into her camp by a procla
mation which cites that a victory for England and
France will deprive Italy of all chance of dominating
the Mediterranean.
HORRIBLE BRUTALITIES LAID TO RUSSIANS.
Washington, Sept. 2.—The German embassy re
ceived wireless from Berlin announcing that "the Ger
man and Austrian troops have occupied Lodz, the larg
est manufacturing center in Russian Poland, and that
the battle northward from Lemberg is continuing.
"The report is confirmed that the French abduct
ed 14 women and 25 children from a German frontier
place also a hospital doctor and assistant from Lorch
ingen. Fate unknown.
"The pajsers are full of Russian horrors in East
Prussia. The Russians cut off the breast of a mother
and impaled her five children on a fence.
"Four Cossacks ravished a woman while they
handcuffed hex husband and forced him to be a wit
ness."
CLAIM RUSSIANS ARE FALLING BACK.
Later, the German embassy here received the fol
lowing additional wireless from Berlin:
"The news that the German troops have left Brus
sels on account of the situation in East Prussia is
wrong. The German administration in Brussels is
very active, civil servants arriving every day for newly
organized offices. The French official statement that
the Russians have completely invested Koenigsberg,
also is a lie. The Russians never covered half the dis
tance between the frontier and Koenigsberg, and are
now retreating eastward after the annihilation of their
Narew army.' The Gazette Del Popolaro, a respectable
paper, calls London a lie factory comparable to Shang
hai during the Russo-Japitnese war."
fell
I rend
.•,' V.v -7
German Report From Berlin Denies That Troops Have Been Sent From East to Meet In
vading Russians—Government of Brussels by Germany Is Being Strengthened-*
Jr Kaiser Watches the Battle From the Firing Lines
te**
•SMil
KAISER WATCHES BATTLE'S PROGRESS. \r
London, Sept. 2.—The Daily Mails' correspond
ent at Abbeville, France, learns that Emperor William
was in Charleroi, Belgium, last Saturday, where,
viewed the battle from the firing line, going la,i
the morning to Mons. The emperor spent
night in Brussels where he stayed at the
Paris, Sept. 2.—The Petit Parisian says fourteen
German staff officers have been captured, and sent to
Nimes in the department of Gard.
London, Sept. 2.—Baron Lewis Von Horst of Co
burg, Germany, was arrested here on the charge of
espionage, and placed in one of the concentration
camps as a prisoner of war. The baron has extensive
hop interests in California. He is a brother of D.
Partullo, of New York.
London, Sept. 2.—Official casualties suffered by
the cavalry brigade and also three divisions, less on
brigade of the British force m^France, follow: Killed,
36 officers, 127 men Woutiaed, 57 officers,. 629 men
is in 9 5 of an 4 1 8 3
Rome, Sept. 2.—The Gornale d'ltaly publishes a'
dispatch from Vienna saying that the Austrian gov
ernment has made arrangements for the evacuation
of Lemberg, Galicia—Lemberg is the capitol of Ga
licia. Recently dispatches described it is invested by
Russian troops, and reports from St. Petersburg de
clared that the "Iron Ring" around Lemberg was be
ing drawn closer and closer.
GERMANS KILL THEIR SEVERELY WOUNDED^
London, Sept. 2.—The Ostend correspondent of
The Express quotes Leon Hiard, senator of Hainault,
as testifying "that the Germans killed their own se
verely wounded, only tending those who would soon
recover."
GERMAN ADVANCE STILL CONTINUES.
Paris, Sept. 2.—Reports of refugees arriving here
that the Germans are fighting in the vicinity of Com
peigne, in the department of Oise, indicate further ad
vances by the Germans. Previous reports had them
fighting at LaFere, in the department of Aine, about
70 miles from Paris. Compeign is 40 miles from Paris,
just north of the department of Seine, in which Paris
is located.
Washington, Sept. 2.—Official advices received
through diplomatic channels Tuesday reported the
two most important developments of the present Eu
ropean war.
Great Britain has asked the United States to tie
prepared to care for the British diplomatic interests in
Turkey, indicating that the allies have practically lost
hope of persuading the Ottoman empire to remain neu
tral. Dispatches received at the British embassy re
ferred to the incorporation into the Turkish army of
several German officers, which is regarded as the fore
runner of intervention by the Porte in behalf of Ger
many.
WILL EXTEND WAR ZONE.
Turkey's entry into the conflict means the imme
diate alignment of Italy, as well as Greece on the side
of Great Britain, France, Russia, Servia, Montenegro
and Roumania, diplomats here believe. Just what the
attitude of Bulgaria will be is a matter of uncertainty,
though the Turkish ambassador here issued a state
ment speaking of the community of interest of Bul
garia and Turkey. The Turkish situation is being
watched with the deepest concern by diplomats, be- s#
cause of the imminence of a general war in the Balkans
and the extension of the war drama to all £a$tern
Europe-
EVENING
EDITION
TEN PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
IB IMS Ht
CENSORSHIP PROBLEM,!*#
When the president returns tomorrow, the replies
of Germany and Great Britain, accepting the Ameri
can proposal for censoring coded messages -at the
(Continued on Page 10.)
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