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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 02, 1914, Image 6

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AID FOR ENGLAND
Native Troops of Indian,
Bound for European War,
Are Born Fighters.
Britain's native troops in India,
some of whom are to be brought to
Prance to reinforce the British army
number 140,000 men. with whom
about 70,000 white soldiers are min
gled so that no large force ol' natives
is left alone at any point. The natives
are organized Into forty regiments of
cavalry and 164 battalions of infan
try. oach having seventeen British
and sixteen native officers. The native
officers are all company or squadron
officers, the British occupying the
higher positions. Each cavalry regi
ment is divided into four squadrons,
and each infantry battalion into four
double companies.
As a further precaution against na
tive troops breaking out into mutiny,
there is no native artillery, except
twelve mountain batteries.
The backbone of the native army is
composed of Sikhs and Kurkhas, the
two elements favored in recruiting
and especially relied on by the Brit
ish officers. In the earlv days the
native troops were mainly Sepoys,
from the Hindu province of Bengal.
It was the Sopoys who mutinied in
1857 and massacred many Britons.
The Sikhs, who had been conquered
In the Punjab war only ten years be
fore, helped to su'bdue the Sepoys at
that time, and have been dependable
troops ever since.
Natural lighting Men.
The Sikhs are generally tall and
well built, and natural fighting men.
"The Sikh," says the encyclopedia
Britanica, "is a fighting man and his
best qualities are shown in the army,
Which is his natnml profession. Hardy,
brave and slow-witted, obedient to
discipline, attached to his offices, he
makes the finest soldier of the east.
Tn victory he retains his steadiness,
and in defeat he will die at his post
father than yield."
There are only 2,000.000 Sikhs in
7ndia out of the 300.000,000 people
there, but there are 30,000 Sikhs in
the British army. There is no Sikh
xribe, but the name signifies a religion,
an offshoot from Rrahmanism dating
from the fifteenth century. The Sikhs
are found in three tribes in the Pun
jab and the Northwest Presidency.
They are fatalists and their faith is
a higher type than Brahmanism.
Gurkhas All Riflemen.
The Gurkhas are little fellows, but
splendid fighters as their record in
the Afghan wars will show. They are
not from India, proper, but from Ne
pal, an independent state in the Him
alayas. northeast of India. Nepal has
been friendly to the Rritish for many
years and the Gurkhas are not dis
couraged from enlisting in the British
army. Nepal has a standing army of
her own, 50.000 strong. There are
20,000 of them in the army of Tndla,
In ten regiments of two battalions
each, all riflemen. They are the de
scendants of Brahmans who were
driven from the .plains of India by the
Moslems, centuries ago. and their
faith is a form of Brahmanism.
The other native troops of India are
picked men from the' northern part
of the country. Those of the south
are no longer worked with as army
material. Outside of the Sikhs and
Gurkhas the native regiments are of
different faiths and are brigaded with
white troops.
Praised by Roberts.
Ijord Roberts, who wrote a book on
"Forty-one Years in India," speaks
highly of the native troops as they
are now organized, though he did not
think much of the Sepoys of early
days.
"I have a. thorough belief in and ad
miration for Kurkhas, Sikhs, Dogras,
Rajputs. Jats and selected Mahome
tans." says "Bobs" in his book. "t
thoroughly appreciate their soldierly
qualities. Brigaded with British troops
I would be proud to lead them against
any European enemy."
The Sikhs are especially noted for
their devotion, and one of them made
a shield of his body to save L,ord Rob
erts in one of the Afghan battles.
HOMEOPATHY
Hereafter, instead of. dally articles
tpon Homeopathy, .we will publish In
the Sunday morning and Monday
evening Herald, articles on medical
topics that will be of vital interest to
all. You can't afford to neglect to
read these.
Country.
Anstria
Hungary
Belgium
France ....
Germany ..
Great Britain
a
•Japan
Itb. Arthur and P. Margaret Peake,
Widlund Building, Grand Forks. N.
J.—Adv. Photo waIs^a^rat^%hGeXuie atW^S.haVe
WHAT SOUTH AMERICA WANTS TO BUY
FOR SALE.
The annual trade of South America Is $965,123,447 in imports and
$1,178,829,512 in exports.
Government reports of the United States .issued bv the new South
American bureau of the department of commerce set forth the fol
ltwing imports and exports of South America:
ARGENTINA—Imports: Automobiles, agricultural and dairy machin
ery, cement, furniture, oil stoves, windmills, wire fencing, kitchen
utensils, hardware, canned and fancy foodstuffs. Exports: Beef,
mutton, hides, animal hair, bristles, flax wool and whale oil.
BRAZIL—Imports: Flour, cement, condensed milk, rubber goods,
pianos, furniture, dried fruits, typewriters, paints. Exports: Coffee,
cocoa, hides, manganese ore, Brabil nuts, carnauba wax, crude rub
ber, sugar and tobacco.
BOLIVIA—Imports: Cheap clothing, flour, electrical goods. Exports:
Crude rubber, ebony, cocoa, sugar cane, spices, tin, zinc, bismuth,
copper.
CHILE Imports: Cement, cotton goods, cotton yarn, manufactured
iron and steel, locomotives, petroleum, products, woolen goods. Ex
^'^ra*es- borate, iodine, wool, htdes, honey and beeswax.
COLOMBIA—Imports: Prepared foodstuffs, crockery, drugs and medi
cines, metal wares, cotton goods, perfumes, soaps. Exports: Coffee,
gold, hides, bananas, rubber, platinum and nuts.
ECUADOR—Imports: Foodstuffs, cheap textiles, boots, shoes. Ex-
P?1"'®1 Cocoa beans, coffee, Panama hats, ivory, nuts, rubber, hides.
PARAGUAY—Imports: Household utensils, sewing machines, agricul
tural implements, cotton goods, hardware, foodstuffs. Exports: For
est and livestock products, tobacco, yerba mate.
PERU Imports: Cotton textiles, leather goods, metal wares, china,
paints, prepared foodstuffs. Exports: Sugar, rubber, guano, copper,
silver sulphide, vanadium.
URUGUAY—Imports: Cotton goods, paper manufactures, wood manu
factures, chemical products, cement, refined sugar, window glass,
*«nce wire galvanized iron, paints. Exports: Livestock products.
VENEZUELA—Imports: Agricultural implements, cotton goods, flour,
lara, rice, wire. Exports: Coffee, cocoa and agricultural products.
NORMAL AND PRESENT COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES
WITH NATIONS AT WAR.
This table shows the 1918 commerce of the United States wjth th4
countries now at war:
Exports. Imports.
28,»20,7»« $ 19.1#2,41«
.. ,845,462 41,941.014
.. 146.100,201 116,877,990
.. HI,84.212 199.963,071
.. 597,149,0G9 29S.864.940
vgS16.466.214 •p29,sl5,217
•5^87,741,815 91.633,240
•J^p«n iuid Russia are the only two countries In'which the imports
exceetj the' exports. The balance, .in favor .,0* Japan 'ta $38,891,425.
while for. Rossi* it is 82,850,008.
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AND WHAT IT HAS
Condition
of Tra4e.
at Present.
Excess of
Exports.
$ 4,128,282 None.
24,904,448 Almost npne.
9,222,211 Fair.
142,721,141 None.
801,584,119 Improving.
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GERMAN'S All IS
AT STAKE IN WAR
German Eritor Lauds Hero
ism of Nation in Conflict—
Criticizes Hindu Troops.
(By Herman Ridder. Editor of New
York. Staats Zeitung.)
New York, Sept. 2.—The news that
came over the feverish wires contains
the announcement of the use of native
Indian troops 'by England against
Germany. Not many years ago, Brit
ain waged the most barbarous and ter
rible war against these same people.
Every child knows the story of Indfa,
where the natives were lashed to the
mouths of cannons and shot to pieces.
When it comes to tales of cruelty and
barbarism, let not England hold up its
hands in holy horror and, pointing at
Germany, say, "thank God, I am bet
ter than they."
In this connection. I read with con
siderable amazement of the horror of
the sensitive American press over the
dropping of bombs in Antwerp, while
the same press brought, without the
least thrill of dismay, the news of the
dropping of bombs in Nurnberg toy a
French aviator. Does a German bomb
in Antwerp differ In any way from a
French bomb in Nurnberg?
Will Not Blind History.
In England the opponents of war,
and I understand that they are repre
sented In the house of commons,
maintain that the foreign office failed
to do everything possible to avoid the
wa.r. It is certain that England knew
of the agreements, the plans and the
purpose's of France and Russia. Eng
land knew on July 1 of this year what
all the world knows now—namely,
that Germany and Atistria had been
isolated by the intrlgjies of diplomacy
at the triple entente, and that the
dream of Edward VH to crush his
1
m°re
l^
FIRST ACTUAL PHOTOGRAPH FROM BELGIUM SHOWING THE DEAD ON THE BATTLEFIELD
P, ,y
S LWGe
THE GRAND FORKS DAILY HERALD, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 2, 1014.
'WS Sj"
tha"
BELGIUM IN RUINS THE BURNED AND BLACKENED FARMHOUSE DESTROYED BY THE FOE
v^aoo
GERMANY'S TERRIBLE FIGHTING MEN IN CAM^^^TER THE BATTLE OF VICE
?.rv
.A«.....vv.wj a ikf
WOrda could de8Cribe the horrore
terrible fighting men the world has ever seen.
hated nephew was about to be real
ized. The fart that England, Russia
and France join the chorus shouting,
"the kaiser did It, the kaiser did it."
will not blind history when it places
the responsibility for this war.
Those were trying days during July
for the German government. From
every side its enemies were preparing
its annihilation. The action of the
German socialists has made a deep
impression upon me. I know the
tempei- of that party. There is no
group of men anywhere more loyal to
its principles, more steadfast In its
purpose. Had this been a ruthless
unnecessary war .of conquest, dictated
by the kaiser, and a military autocracy
the socialist party in Germany would
have declined to participate in it.
They would have permitted them
selves to be shot rather than support
such a war. The ridiculous story
printed at the outbreak of hostilities
that 100 socialist leaders were ex
ecuted has gone to join that great
army of misrepresentation and false
hood that is 'belng augmented day by
day with reports of German cruelty
and German barbarity.
Germany Fighting the World.
Germany is fighting the-world. Civi
lized Europe is calling upon uncivil
ized Africa and Asia to wipe out the
Teutonic empires Strangely enough,
a part of public opinion in America,
stimulated by a powerful press appar
ently,. favors the allies.
Sometiities in the seclusion of my
study I ponder on this question. Am
I the less American because my sym
pathies are roused when the odds are
six to two? Am I the less American
because I am thrilled when a young,
vigorous empire defies'the world to
crush it? Why is it that I find some
thing heroic and stirring where you
remain cold and unsympathetic?
Wherein lies th» difference in your
point of view and" mine? Is there no
compromise ground upon* Which we
can meet in thorough accord and har
mony?- We agree, do we not. that Ger
man culture and German science have
placed the world under a deep debt at
gratitude.
We all deplore this miserable war
whtch can do no one any permanent
good. We all want to see it ended
within _the shortest possible space of
time. Yet we are divided in our sym
pathy over the.two parties engaged.
You rise in horiror when death is
KKn W *t vftL-nvM»
T~
war"
Thc
^cad horses and
TO",
Here they are at rest.
dropped from a Zeppelin, and I look
with dismay upon the use of African,
Turco and Asian Sikh against the
white man. You smile in satisfaction
when hundreds of millions of dollars
of German commerce is wiped out in
a few sudden weeks, and fail to realize
that you are living in the days where
a nation is taking the greatest gam
ble jn the world's history.
1
Nation Stakes All.
Napoleon staked his all on imperial
conquest, but he was only one man,
great though he was. Germany on the
other hand presents the unexampled
picture of a white nation throwing its
all on the fortune of a war against the
world. When a great empire fights for
life or death, for national greatness or
national calamity, for all or nothing,
it seems strange to me that there lives
a man unmoved bv the tremendous
gamble of it all. In my own small
way I have during my business career
staked my everything on the success
or failure of an enterprise. Posslbiv
you have done the sajne.
Life is made up of the taking and
giving of chances. Now consider a na
tion of three scores of millions risk
ing their "everything. untold millions
of property, the future of their empire
and culture and tell me that it does
not rouse in you a feeling of respect
and-a measure of sympathy. 'When
an individual makes the big gamble
you say he is a' man and when a na
tion stakes its all vou can well answer
they kre a nation of men: Neither
victory nor defeat can alter the in
spiration of German unit. When a
family is divided against itself it falls
an easy prey to its.enemles, but when
it stands strong and. together, it passes
through vicissitudes and calamities to
an. eventual victory- It is a.great and
courageous people that cai) wage a
war such, as Germany is Waging.
And some people. make a specialty
of taking advice from strangers.
E E
WAR
HELL
IS
TODAY AND TOMORROW
BRITtAN HUH! FOR WW FIRST
100,000 KM ABt
gone into training in various parts of the coun y,
men now are enrolling at a much quicker rate for the
second hundred thousand.
In London alone, ten thousand joined the colors
•n the last two days, while the response in the pro
vinces has been equally gratifying. In Birmingham
where the recruiting is particularly brisk, the Lor
Mayor, Colonel Ernest Martineau, has resigned his
office and volunteered for foreign service.
ULSTER MEETING CALLED.
Sir Edward Carson, the Ulster Unionist leader,
has called a meeting of the leaders of the Ulster vol
unteer force for Thursday, when he 11 submit a
scheme with the concurrence of the war office for the
utilization of this force in one body. ..
At a reception by King George at Buckingham
Palace of the Belgian mission, which is enroute to the
United States to protest against the alleged German
atrocities in the war zone, an address to the kng was
read, setting forth some of the happenings in the pres
ent campaign, and thanking the king for Great Bri
tain's aid. Regarding the alleged German brutalities,
it said:
CLAIMS OF BRUTALITIES.
"Our adversary, invading our territory, has deci
mated civil population, massacred women and child
ren, carrie'd into captivity inoffensive peasants, put to
death and wounded, destroyed undefended towns,
burned churches and historical monuments and the
famous library of the University of Louvain. All these
facts are established by authenticated documents, each
of which we will submit to the government of your
majesty."
KING SHOCKED.
The king replied that Great Britain would support
Belgium that he was grateful for the gallant Belgian
resistance and added that he was shocked to the re
ports of German brutality.
Austrian Explains Why Russians
Are Successful in Making Advance
Along the East Prussia Frontier
That the reporter! Russian advance I vian victories, according to the advices
in East Prussia is due to the fact that
Germany has decided not to sacrifice
any great number of men in defense
of the territory east of the A'istula
river, is information conveyed in of
ficial advices received from the em
hasy in Wahington by Edgar Proch
nik. Austro-Hungarian consul in St.
Paul. A similar condition, according
to these advices, exists in the eastern
end of the Austrian province of Gali
cia, where the Russians report ad
vances.
Germans Retiring Westward.
The official report says.East Prussia
is an open country and the Germans
gradually are retiring westward to
ward the Vistula river along which is
a continuous line of fortifications, ex
tending from Koenigsberg in the north
to Thorn in the south. The latter for
tification will be used as a base for
the German army in its operations
against the Russians. The report says
the Germans, aided by two Austrian
army corps,. expect to occupy Paris
and then return to drive the. Russians
out of 15:ist Prussia.
Servian Accounts Kxplained.
According to the official Austrian
advices, eastern Ualicia is an open
country and no strenuous effort t.»
check the Russian advance, in tlv.it
territory will be made. The report
adds the Austrians have withdrawn
tvops from Servian territory, leaving
only a number sufficient to check a
.Servian invasion. The reported Ser-
LET'S GO to the
Minnesota
State Fair
Exposition
received here, are merely Servian oc
cupation of towns from which the
Austrians have withdrawn to make
an invasion of Russian Poland.
Austrians Toward Warsaw.
The official advices say the main
Austrian army Is concentrating its
efforts on an invasion of Russian Po
land, with Warsaw- as the objective.
The advices add that the Austrian
government, when it occupies War
saw, will make Poland an independ
ent province.
The Austrian advance through Rus
sian Poland is being made in front -of
its line of fortifications extending west
from Lambf rg. ftast of I^ainberg, how
ever, there are no fortifications, and it
is in this territory that the Russians
are operating. The Austrian armv, go
ing north from its fortifications into
Russian Poland, is reported to have
driven the Russians to Lublin.
Revolution Tales Denied.
The Austrian advices sav the Aus
tro-Hungarian mobilization progressed
satisfactorily and amid great enthus
iasm. The embassy report says all
Party conflicts in Austro-Hungary
have ceased and that all parties are
working with the government. Th»
reports r'-rv tl— -illegr.l .-o-ol-tions
»r V'h in ."fijuo am: call uL
ici.t.un to iiu: enthusiastic demonstra
tion given the German consul-general
at Prague by the Tshek residents of
that city. The rcnorted executions of
Tshek revolutionary leaders at Prague
is branded as a falsehood.
and
HAMLINE, MINN.
Midway between Mlnneapolis-St. Paul
September 7-12, 1914
We will not attempt here to list or describe the at
tractions that will be shown to do so would require
a large volume. A good fair stimulates all arteries
of agriculture, commerce and education, encourages
further development of natural resources and reflects
the prosperity s»nd growth of your state. Every eood
citizen^should if possible at least confer the benefit
his or her presence may yield by attending.
Educational, Entertaining, Inspiring
a Beneficial
W. E. HANDY, Agent
Northern Pacific Railway
A. M. CLELAND. Gen. Pass. Agent. St Paul,
Our
assortment
MI—
PUT UP YOUR
AWNINGS
of
•Jwwhw. worttS^i?*
lowest. See Our
G*and Forks Tent & Awnino
211 N. 5th St., Qrand Forks, N. D. Flthn. nT
VH
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rlP
citiier Phone I304L

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