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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 03, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89074405/1914-09-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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EVENING
EDITION
VOL. 0, NO. 209.
DQUCHESA
NAKED BY BALLOT
Of THE CAftWiALS
S.-
Bologna. Italy, Prelate Suc
ceeds Pope Pius X—His
Politics are Stated.
Rome, Sept. 3.—Cardinal Delia
'Chiesa was elected pope In succes
sion to Pius X. The new pope
will assume the name of Benedict
XV. His election was brought
•bout on the 'fourth ballot.
Cardinal Ciacno Delia Chiesa, who
was elected pope by the sacred col
lege, was created cardinal May 25,
1914. He was archbishop of Bologna,
Italy. He was born at Pegli in the
diocese of Genes, November 21, 1854,
and was ordained priest on December
21, 187$. He served as secretary of
the Noncialure in Spain from 1883 to
1887, in which year he was appointed
secretary to the late Cardinal Ram
polla.
He was appointed substitute secre
tary of state In 1901, and in 1907 he
was elected to the post of advisor to
the holy office.
The same year he was appointed
papal nuncio of Madrid in successsion
to Monsignor Rianoldln, hut this ap-
Jater.
ointment
was cancelled three dayB
This incident occurred just before
he was made archbishop of Bologna.
When he was given the latter post, it
w&s declared at Rome that it was
mainly with the object of combating
modern religious ideas, Bologna be
ing the headquarters of the national
democratic league, whose members
advocated what is known as modern
ism in religion.
While at Bologna this year, the new
pope, issued a pastoral letter strongly
fecmoBmnln* ttre'-tabfeo."
It.hap .been 174-years since the time
•f the .last Pdpe-^B9B"e4Jct^t- *%V
.TAKE AUTO -TRIP
Bismarck Business Men Getting Ac
quainted Along Soo line.
Bismarck, N. D., Sept. 3.—The ''Get
Acquainted'' trip by local business
men over the north branch of the
Soo took, place today, the party leav
ing early this morning. A large
crowd of business men went on this
trip. The train left Bismarck
promptly at 7:00 a. m., and was to
make stops at Baldwin, Wilton, Wash
burn, Underwood, Cole Harbor, Gar
rison, Max, Douglas, Ryder, Malfotl,
Plaza -Benedict, Kief, Dogden, Ruso
and Drake- Dinner was obtained at
Max, and supper will be taken at
Drake, where the special train will
arrive at about 7:30 o'clock. The
train will return to Bismarck Immedi
ately after supper.
The Bismarck band accompanied
the party and was to play at every
stop.
HAUVBOTWAR
OPPONENTS HELD
Austrians and Germans For
bidden to Leave Canada
—They Travel Little.
Adolph Swennumson of Bow Island,
Alberta, Canada, a former resident of
Grand Forks, arrived in the city to
day for a short stay. He is attending
to business matters and visiting with
old friends. Mr. Swennumson has not
lived here for many years, having
moved away when a boy. At one time
he attended the grades in the Central
school.
Mr. Swennumson is connected with
the Bow Island Gas and Calgary Oil
company, and states that his company
is now making arrangements to sup
ply the city of Calgary with 10,000,
000 feet of gas a day. The franchise
has not actually been granted yet,
but it is practically certain that this
concern Will get it, The gas will be
sent by pipe a distance of 190 miles.
The pipes will be placed on top of the
ground. The gas sells. for two and
one-half cents per thousand cubic
feet
Mr. Swennumson states* that the
crops, in Alberta are almost a com
plete failure this year. The largest
yield.of wheat which he has heard of
so far is seven bushels to the acre.
The farmers In that section will have
a hard time to get along as a rseult
of the bad crops.
In speaking of the war situation
in (Canada, Mr. Swennumson stated
that there is great excitement in the
dbmihion, declaring also that the
government is able to get any number
of vqlunteera to send abroad. Can
adians wll Inot allow any Germans or
Austrians to leave the country, fear
ing that they may be going back to
servarin the war. They are not al
lowed to travel very much In Cana
da itfid are closely .watched.. Mr.
Swennutnson states that the train on
Which .he- traveled yesterday was
crowded with government -detectives
who were- looking tor Germans and
Austrians who are trying to leave the
oountry. Other nationalities are not
bothered, he maintained. •,
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WAR TAX MEASURE
Will Appear Before Con
gress Tomorrow, Urging
Special Financial Laws*
Washington, Sept. 8.—President
Wilson will appear before the joint
session of congress tomorrow after
noon at 12:30 o'clock to ask for a
war tax measure to raise $100,000,000
annually.
This announcement was made fol
lowing the visit of Democratic Lead
er Underwood to the White House.
In his message the president will not
advise the means of raising money.
North Dakota: Cooler In south
east portion tonight warmer
Friday* In west portion tonight.
I4ght frost probable in extreme
east portion tonight.
UNIVERSITY WEATHER.
7 a. m. 48 maximum A8 min
Impm 44 wind 15 miles north
west barometer 80.17.
Resolutions of the Republi
cans and Other Officers
Are Elected.
Bismarck, N. D., Sept. 8.—Frank
Sprague of Grafton, one of the best
known republicans in the state, was
elected chairman of the republican
state central committee at the biennial
meeting here yesterday.
Mr. Sprague's election was follow
ed by the designation of Grand Forks
as the headquarters for the year's
campaign.
J. M. Devine of. Mlnot was elected
secretary R. S. Lewis of Fargo was
made chairman, and M. J. George of
Flasher and Gran'd Forks, was elect
ed chairman of the executive com
mittee.
The committee on resolutions was
then named, with Joseph Devine as
chairman. The other members were
R. S. Lewis, E. E. Enge, A. Webber,
George Schafer, E. L. Garden, Major
J. G. Hamilton, L. A. Simpson and
E. C. Olsgard.
F. S. Talcott, Ralph Ward,- George
Rose, E. D. Rlchter and K. L. Ram
sett, were appointed on the commit
tee on permanent organization. In
addition to naming iMr. Sprague per
manent chairman, Mr. Devine was
elected secretary and R. S. Lewis,
treasurer.
Representatives of suffrage and an
ti-suffrage movements in the state
had hearings before the meeting. Mrs.
N. C. Young of Fargo spoke against
suffrage and Mrs. Darrow of the same
city spoke for the endorsement of the
cause.
Adopt Platform.
The following is the platform as
adopted by the committee Wednes
day:
We, the members of the state central
committee, representing the Repub
lican'party in meeting assembled, re
affirm our belief in and our loyalty
to the principles of the Republican
party as laid down by its founders and
exemplified by its great leaders.
1. We affirm our loyalty to the Re
publican principles of protection, and
believe that the tariff should be so re
vised as to reduce the growing high
cost of living and at the same time
protect, more equitably, the agricultu
ral Interests that such tariff should
be revised upon .the principle that the
customs duties enacted shall represent
no more than the actual difference
in the cost of production, between that
of the United States and all foreign
competing countries. We also recom
mend and urge that, tariff revision in
the future shall be' by'separate and
distinct schedules. We favor the cre
ation of a permanent, non-partisan
tariff commission, with ample powers
and charged with the duty of Invest
igating the cost of production, both at
home and abroad, and whose findings
shall be made direct to congress.
Condemn Democracy.
We condemn the National Democrat
ic administration' for its bad faith In
its enactment of the present tariff
law. It has succeeded only in flooding
our home markets with foreign impor
tations from both-factory and' farm,
while yet the serious question, of the
growing high cqstlof l}v)hg still pre
vails, unsettled andunanswered.
2. We favor such natiqnal and
(Continued pri Page ,i.)
Country.
Prince Frederick William Dook
His Own Life, Follow®
That Sent Countrymen $o Death
Ijortdon, Sept. 8.—Prince Frederick Wtlliam of"£ty|pe took his own
lire, following the mistake of his regiment, according ly Lady Ran
dolph Churchill, formerly Miss Jennie Jerome of Ne«#'£ork, who has
just arrived from Germany, coming by way of Hollands
"The true story of the death of Prince IMttUi William of
Uppe," said lady .Churchill, "to that he committed suicide. He was
CTiumandinjc a German cavalry regiment before liege on August*,
when his men, In darkness and the terrible 'ObnfcuiiAA' Of fighting in
barbed wire entanglements, beneath the blinding gl*#e of search*
lights from the forts, nearly annihilated a Gorman Infantry regi
ment which the cavalry had mistaken for Belgians. The prince shot
himself, fearing to face the anger of Emperor WUHmd
"His widow, with whom I am acquainted, 'waA bkformed of the
prince's death, Angust 14, ten days later."
SPRAGUE THE HAN TO
RANKS
Of PWAN PAItIYi
The election of Frank' Sprague
as head of the republican party
of North Dakota Is looked upon'
by prominent party members of
the state, as one of the best moves
that could possibly have been
made by the committee members.
Mr, Sprague is a prominent citi
zen, long closely identified with
the: state's business interests, and
he Is looked npon as a man who
can successfully brine about the
union of the republican forces
under a single banner.
Mr. Sprague's election to the
chairmanship was unanimous,
and It was only after considerable
persuasion that he consented to
take the position.
SOCIALISTS SELECT
HOT HEN FOR JOBS
ON CENTRAL COMMITTEE
Bismarck, N. D., Sept 3 —The state
central committee of the socialist par
ty met and perfected their organiza
tion. Henry S. Teigen of Mlnot was
selected as chairman of the state or
ganization, Grant S- Younmans of Ml
not as secretary and Eugene Teutsch
of Mlnot as treasurer.
The major part of the socialist
platform Is taken up with proposals
for the adjustment of the relations of
capital and labor and urges the aboli
tion of all classes and olass privileges
The abolition of the national and
state senate is advocated in the plat
form, also the abolition of t'he veto
power for the. governor. Woman's
Suffrage is endorsed.
Child labor laws, dissemination of
information regarding the raising of
Children, protection for laborers
against accident, union labor, and
home rule for counties and cities are
otber resolutions.
An Interesting clause refers to real
estate taxation, and advocates all
owners of land who are not peresonal
UBers thereof, to fix their own value
for the purpose of taxation, with the
option in the state or county to ac
quire title to same at the valuation so
fixed.
The creation of a state department
Of agriculture, In which farmers alone
eftiall have a vote. Is urged by this de
partment .to establish and maintain
elevators, flour mills, packing houses,
etc.
PROGRESSIVES NAME I
TURNER AS CHAIRMAN
PROMISE HARD FIGHT
Bismarck, N. D., Sept. t.—Members
of the Bull Moose party gathered In
the city Wednesday and perfected an
organisation. H. R. Turner of Fargo
wag elected chairman of the commit
tee. end W. D. Sweet of Fargo was
named treasurer, and P. O. Thoreson
of Grand Forks, secretary. The. plat
form of two year's ago was indorsed.:
Dorr.' Carroll of Mlnot, states that an
active campaign will 'begin soon. H.
H. Aaker of Fargo, candidate for gov.
erjior on the progressive ticket, will'
make a three weeks' tour over thfe
state In the Interests' of thd partjr«
•Hi
vr
A 0 TJKtjjW EATC S
GRAND FORKS, N. ljt Tfft$it$DAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 3,1914.
hsh
IMPORTS INTO SOUTH AMERICA,
United Kingdom.
.. .*114,616,800
8,528,041
... 77,519,726
.... 38,599,283
... 7,838,878
4,268,168
1,298,248
6,800,708
... 12,648,000
5,116,000
Argentine .......
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Qulanas (British)
Paraguay
Peru
Uraguay
Venezuela
Germany.',
$61.703.560kS
6,423,802
52,952,625#
33,189,070
2,011,886
•,. e:
1,500,968
4,667,698 "i
7,895,000
3,490,000
Total $215,362,090 $175,549,610 t's| $164,226,088
SPRAGII AND PERRY HEAD OPPOSING PIUTE W
COMHC EtfCDON GRAND FORKS IS SElfCIED AS
HEADQUARTERS Of REPUBLICAN PARTY'S CAMPAIGN AUGUST CLOUDY
lu OfAR DAYS FEW
United States,
•f $57,057,505
I 1,787,821
48,049,922
16,806,341
f. 7,612.037
2,172,587
804,888
5,763,432
5.671,000
it 6,236,000
Affairs at A. C. and Univers
ity are Discussed—-Brock
hoff Quits the Ticket.
Bismarck, N. D., Sept. 8 —The dem
ocratic state central committee held
a lively session last night at the Grand
Pacific hotel, at which time it elected
H. H. Perry, of Ellendale, chairman,
and John B. Fried of Jamestown vice
chairman.
There was a spirited fight on the
resolutions, especially on the prohi
bition and woman's suffrage planks.
About 50 members were present,
Chairman McArthur presiding, and
Secretary Fred McLean assisting. The
credentials committee reported first,
and there was a lively time over the
seating of M. A. Hildreth. the Casey
forces keeping up a fight for J. W.
McHose.
Hildreth Forces Win.
It was charged that, the precinct's
committee vote was a tie because one
of the men in the committee room
had no business there, and that this
necessitated the drawing of ballots for
position. Mr. Hildreth spoke at
length, and charged ulterior motives
in stirring in contention over the
place. The final vote was a: victory
for Hildreth, 25 to 14. This Is con
sidered the first victory for Hildreth
?ver the Casey forces, the men being
competitors for the office of United
States district attorney.
Both Perry and Fried were nomin
ated for 'chairman, but it was con
tended that Fried had expressed him
self as not desiring the position. His
name remained in nomination, never
theless, and final vote was 28 1-2 to
10 1-2 In favor of Perrv.
Fried was made vice •chairman, and
Secretary Fred McLean was re-elect
ed. Jos. M. Kelly of Devils Lake was
made treasurer. There was no con
test over the executive committee.
Recognize MoArthnr.
The names of Geo. P. Jones, J. Nel
son Kelly,-- Frank P. Willson, Jens
Peterson, J. P. Lamb, John Sprafka,
Chas.' Simons and D. H. McArthur
.were placed in nomination and unani
mously approved.
Colonel Kelly insisted on recogni
tion for Mr. McArthur.
Resolutions as read were the sub*
jeot of extended defbate, which waxed
warm at times. The principal argu
ment was' over the second clause
which had to do with the proposition
that the party's candidates, if elected,
would strictly enforce every law.
Prohibition Is Bone.
This was understood to have-par
ticular reference to prohibition, and
was construed by some to be "strad
dling" 'the Question. It- was .held that
the' party should either endorse or
coiidemn prohibition in an unquali
fied manner or leave out the plank.
The argument was great and most
heated, the principal participants be
ing Frank A. Willson. M. A. Hildreth.
Senator Puroell and Frank Hellstrom.
Objections to the clause were finally
.withdrawn, when the latter two men
stated that they, who are principally
concerned in the coming election, fev
ered the clause as It stood.
•On the matter of woman suffrage
the committee is non. committal.
Talk School Questions.
The question of existing state of
nffairs at the agricultural college and
(Continued on Page 8.)
JAPAN PUTS MORE
TROOPS cm
FWt ANMVASKM
Movement of Forces Contin
es in Spite of Neutrality
of the Great Empire.
Chefo, China, Sept. 8.—Japan land
ed 4,500 additional men at Lung-Kow
today. Of these forces 500 are
marines, the others soldiers. Lung
Kow is a Chinese port, a hundred
miles north of Tsing-Tau, in Kiao
Chow- Between ten and fifteen thou
sand Japanese troops have been land
ed at Lung-Kow previous to today.
Japaneee control telegraph lines out
of Lung-Kow,
Session of Diet.
Tokyo, Sept. 3.—The emperor of
Japan today personally directed a
special session of the diet to convene
September 9. The majority has de
cided formally not to oppose the gov
ernment's war measures.
German Governor Surrenders.
London, Sept. 3.—A dispatch from
Wellington, New Zealand, declared
that the governor of New Zealand has
received word that the German gov
erenor of Samoa has surrendered and
that he has been sent, with other
Geerman prisoners, to the Fiji Islands.
of^. Weather Condi­
tions During Month Shows
Murky Atmosphere.
According to the university
weather station there is a possi
bility for a light frost in the ex
treme east portion of the state
tonight and gardiners and people
with flowers out of doors are ad
vised to cover up their perisha
ble plants. The prediction says
cooler in the southeast portion to
night and generally fair over the
state. There is a prediction for
warmer weather for the state
generally on Friday.
The regular monthly report of the
weather station at the state university
has just been issued. The maximum
temperature for the month of August
was 93, that point being reached on
August 4. The minimum tempera
ture was 39 degrees above zero, which
was reached on two different days,
August 11 and August 26. The mean
temperature for the month was 62.8
degrees above. The mean maximum
was 75.5 degrees and the mean mini
mum was 50.1.
The total precipitation for the
month of August was 3.31 inches, the
heaviest fall In one day being 1.29
inches, which was recorded August
22. There were only six clear days,
twelve partly cloudy and thirteen
cloudy days. There were no killing
frosts during the month. There were
thunderstorms on ten different days
of the month.
Daily Temperature.
The following is the list of daily
temperatures during the month:
Maid- Mini-
Date. mum. mum.
1 79 62
2 79 53
8 91 53
4 93 62
5 80 61
6 80 61
7 82 56
8 75 53
9 •», ........ r. ..... 66 49
10 67 45
11 66 39
1J 78 41
13 73 45
14 76 42
15 86 56
16 86 53
17 78 62
18 79 52
Id 82 56
20 80 55
21 86 :, 50
22 78 59
23 65 46
24 50 41
26 55 42
26 64
27 67 40
28 65 46
29 80 51
30 81 48
SI .... 74 47
SERIOUSLY HURT
Young Cad Run Over by Auto at
Itogo.
Fargo. N. D., Sept. S.—Thomas Mc
Laughlin, a young son of Mr. and Mrs.
Miles McLaughlin of 82S Eighth
street north, was quite seriously Injur
ed by being run over by an automo
bile near the corner of Broadway and
Front street.
The lad is only about $ or 7 years
of.,age: and is in quite "a serious con
dition today, according to reports
from the. physician, who has charge
of the case. I
woman uses newspaper
more apt to get 100 cents plus for her dollar-than her neighbor who -shops haphazard*S
fan
E (fill RUSSIAN VICTOfiV OVER THf
UPORTANGE PUK DflWMD
NO OFFKML ANNOUNCEMENT HADE
~Af ANY CAPITALS TAKEN TO MEAN
BATTLES ABESTUffl THE MAWHG
Invading Aviator at Paris Believed Killed—
Will Defend French Capitol to the Last
Austrian Defeat is Crushing
The absence of official announcements from the
capitols of the belligerents is the surest indication that
the fighting in the east and west continued without
decisive results.
Such news dispatches as escaped the censors tend
ed to confirm the earlier official claims and admissions.
The Germans are pushing their right wing nearer
Paris, while their left and center appear to be held by
the French.
Russia is pressing forward in the Austrian pro
vince of Galicia, after having taken the fortified capi
tol, Lemberg. The Germans admittedly were victor
ious in East Prussia.
The Japanese'have occupied several islands near
Kiao-Chow, and have landed many additional troops
within marching distance of that German stronghold,
in the face of protests by China.
King Nicholas of Montenegro is reported deter
mined to occupy Scutari.
The government of France is now established at
Bordeaux. Foreign embassies and legations, with the
exception of those of the United States and Switzer
land, also have been removed from Paris of Bordeaux.
Military experts agree-that Paris soon will be the
pivot of the hostile forces operating in the area of the
w6st. Even the dovimfall of the French capitol, it is
believed, would hot end these operations.
A feeling of confidence among the allies was in
creased by the news of the great victory of the Rus
sians in Galicia. Reports from Petrograd tell of the
entry of the Russians into Lemberg. These appear
credible, as news of the defeat of the Austrians comes
from a number of sources.
The battle of Lemberg was one of the greatest ev
er fought. Evidently it resulted in the decisive, per
haps overwhelming defeat of the Austrians. The bat
tle line extended 200 miles, and it is estimated that
1,500,000 men were engaged.
ONE OF INVADING PLANES BROUGHT DOWN.
London, Sept. 3.—A dispatch to the Exchange
Telegraph company from Paris declares that one of
the German aeroplanes of the Taube type, which re
cently dropped bombs on the city of Paris, had been
brought down, and two German aviators aboard killed.
Last night two French aviators, who arose to
meet the invasion of three German aeroplanes over
Paris, chased the belligerents without permitting dam
age of any kind to the city. A battle in the air was
fought, and it is believed that one of the Germans,
which became separated from his fellows, was damag
ed, though the plane escaped.
WILL DEFEND CITY TO THE LAST.
Paris, Sept. 3.—It was officially announced that
Gen. Galliani, commander of the army defending the
city, today issued the following proclamation to the in
habitants of Paris:
"The members of the government of the republic
have left Paris in order to give new impetus to the de
fense of the nation. I have been ordered to defend
Paris against the invader. This order I will fulfill to
the end. (Signed)—Galliani, military governor of Par
is, commanding the army of Paris."
PUT 140,000 "HORS DE COMBAT."
Rome, Sept. 3.—A telegram from Nish, Servia,
says that in the battle at Jadar, between 200,000 Aus
trians and 180,000 Servians, the latter put 140,000 Aus
trians "Hors de Combat."
Paris, Sept. 3.—President Poincaire and his cab
inet have left for Bordeaux, the new French seat of
government, where they were scheduled to arrive be
fore noon.
AMIENS FALLS TO THE GERMANS.
London, Sept. 3.—A dispatch from Amiens,
France, to The Daily Mail, dated Sept 1, declares the
Germans had taken possession of Amiens, after three
days' fighting. Amiens is the ciapitol of Somme
v^WIED QUITS NEW KINGDOM.
Durazzo, Albania, Sept 3.—Prince William of
Weid has quit his new kingdom and has sailed for
Venice.
EVENING
EDITION
EIGHT PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
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