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Grand Forks daily herald. (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, September 17, 1914, Image 1

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11
EVENING
EDITION
VOL. 9, NO, 321.
PUH TO
rem
MIES OF
President John Knauf, in ab
le Address, Points Out
Plan of Work.
BELIEVES GREATER
FIELD IN STORE
Big Increase In Membership During
'Fast Year—Organization Has Been
Given Healthy Strength During the
Past Year.
Stringent measures for the protec
tion of the profession against the op
erations of men not admitted to the
bar,and of the operations of out of
the state agencies, are proposed by
the North Dakota Bar association,
^rtilCh began its annual convention
heretoday.
Thfe question tf protection was jllii
cups«4 .this TOorning following the
«pn ual 'or ^r esiuent^TCitatji,
and the report of Secretary Seller,
Iwth, o^f jwhoTn discussed the problem.
•The sesalons df 'the assoeiatibn afe
being held in thfe large council cham
ber of the city hall. Short addresses
and reports by various committees
took up the greater part of the ses
sion.
Mayor James A. Dinnie welcomed
tne visiting attorneys, following the
Invocation by President E. P. Robert
son of Wesley college. Mayor Dinnie
declared that the city and people of
Grand Porks were proud to welcome
such distinguished citizens of the
state. He said that he was proud to
have.the opportunity to welcome them
here. He declared that the city in
all its departments was open to the
visiting lawyers and that it is up to
them to make use of the opportunity.
Everything possible will be done for
their comfort and convenience. Mayor
Dinnie declared.
Judge Lauder Replies.
Judge W. S. Lauder of Wahpeton
•was called upon to reply, on behalf
of the association, to Mayor Dinnie.
He stated that the members of the
association were indeed grateful for
the cordial and generous welcome
which was accorded them. He said
that such assurances as were made
by the mayor gave the attorneys a
zeellng of fine appreciation of what
is being done for them.
Judge Knauf Speaks.
Judge Knauf then called Vice Presi
dent B. W. Shaw of Mandan to the
chair and delivered his annual ad
dress. Judge Knauf declared that
members of the bar at the present
time have a serious purpose in mind.
He stated that for many years this
organization was looked upon as a
society merely organized to meet each
year "to eat, dance, drink and be
merry. The speaker said that these
may be some of the essentials of life,
but he believes there is a much higher
aim. He declared that the members
have come to a realization that they
must make progress along other
lines.
The speaker declared that North
Dakota is now passing through a
great formative period. He believes
that the early legislators provided
very wisely for the future of this state,
perhaps more so than was done in
.. other states in the union. He de
clared that it is now time that the
barrister turn to his true profession.
He is of the opinion that too many
of the practitioners at the bar 'have
commercialized the profession. Judge
Knauf declared that it Is one of the
chief aims of the bar association to
secure the release of the legal pro
fession from the grip of commer
cialism.
IiOOks
for Changes.
The speaker declared that it is time
that bench and bar of North Dakota
stood unanimously in the front rank
of the state's progress In laws, and
in fact for all that makes for a com
monwealth of high culture.
.Judge Knauf also declared that
there have been pretending practi
tioners, from other states operating in
North Dakota, and that much hirm
has resulted. He belie.vea that efforts
should be continued to eliminate this
objectionable class of lawyers.
In closing his address Judge Knauf
heartily thanked the members of the
association for placing him at the
head of the organisation during the
year.
Secretary's Report.
Following
athe
president's, address,
Secretary Seller gave his report to the
association He showed that the' as
sociation had grown In membership
considerably during the last year, 81
new members having been enrolled.
Seventy-one were added at the meet
ing last April, and 10 more were tak
en in here. It Is expected that a
large number more will be admitted
here today and tomorrow.
Mr. Seller declared that the associa
tion should strongly urge that every
reputable attorney in the state join
the organization. He believes that
the membership can be raised to the
500 mark with a good campaign.
Need for Protection.
Secretary Seller also made a report
on the proposition of purchasing fix
tures, books, etc., for offices. He stat
ed that all the proceedings of the as
sociation for the past four years are
being printed, the proceedings for
1910 being here for distribution at the
present meeting. The others will be
out soon. Mr. Seller also spoke of
(Continued on Page 10.)
FlfET COMMAND
Transfer to Admiral Fletch
er Occurred on the Wy
oming Today.
New Tork. Sept.-17.—Real Admiral
.J^Jias. Jv.'Biidger today turned over the
command of the Nor^h Atlantic, fleet
mrxhe TfnitB'd^'iBf^tfes^avy to, Beared
miral Frank F. Fletcher, who was
cbmmandet" of tlre' fleet a!t Vera- Cruz
it th'etltWlTof the Afnerican occupa
tion of that city last spring.
The ceremony of the transfer was
Staged on the quarter deck of the batr
tleship Wypming, Rear Admiral Badg
er's flagship, at the Brooklyn navy
yard, in the presence of naval officers
and the Wyoming's crew. Rear Ad
miral Badger read' the order of the
navy department, instructing him to
relinquish command.
HEAD IN "FEEDER.
Moorhead, Minn.. Sept. IT.—Albert
Wirkrud of Hawley. Minn., suffered
a bad accident on a farm near Gard
ner. While pitching bundles into a
threshing machine, he slipped and fell
his head entering, the machine. The
teeth of the feeder crushed the top
of his head, fracturing the skull. The
injured man was brought to Moor
head and taken to the Northwestern
hospital where he is reported to 'be
resting fairly easily.
THE WEATHER.
North Dakota: Fair tonight
and Friday: not mnch change in
temeprature.
—1
UNIVERSITY READINGS.
7 a. m. 44: maximum 69 mini
mum
301
east wind,
12
barometer 30.26:
miles
ft
GUILTY OF CHARGE
Police Chief
Minots
Quit Department, Under
the Verdict.
Minot, N. D., Sept. 17 —Ed. Robin
son, former chief of police of Minot,
and who has been a police patrolman
since his resignation, was ordered re
moved from the department, the
charges made by President Rudd be
ing deeclared well founded in the
opinion of the city commission.
In declaring Robinson guilty, the
commission also ordered his complete
removal from any connection with
the department.
FACES WfSCONSIX CHARGE.
Harvey, N. D., Sept. 17.—Hubert
Fuller, one of the operatives of a
threshing rig north of our city, was
taken into custody by Sheriff J. N.
Kunkel, at the instance of Mr. Carl
Ja^r, sheriff of Trempealean county,
Wisconsin. The man Fuller was
wanted on a statutory charge, and
had escaped from the custody of the
Decent People Abandoned.
DAKOTA* SKATEST
4a±
sheriff on a fjj^mer occasion. Mr.
Fuller waived requisition and accom
panied Sheriff Jtahr on the return
Journey to Wiri^pnsln,
NOSE BROKEN RUNAWAY.
New Englandjr N. D., Sept. 17.—An
accident, which .nrtight easily have re
sulted in one or more fatalities oc
curred here when a horse belonging
to E. A- Ford pf: lteHinger and driven
by E. S. Hunger ran into the carriage
in which G. O. Cnlli'kson and Christ
Lear were riding. The occupants of
both buggies were thrown from the
rigs. All were", onsiderably shaken
up and Christ Le*.r sustained a brok
en nose. Both- buggies were badly
damaged.
WEBB HKt/f FOR TRIAL.
Minot, N. D., Seut. 17.—Oser Webb,
colored, was bound over to the next
term of the district court' on the
charge of keeping and maintaining a
common nuisanefe under J500 bond at
a hearing beforp Police Magistrate
John Lynch, this being his second al
leged offense.
Rebukes Uncle Sam for Taking
Troops Out of Vera Cruz Carden
Just Can't Help Expressing Self
New York, Sept. 17.—Sir Lionel Carden, one-time British minister to
Mexico and recently appointed minister to Brazil, sailing yesterday on the
Celtic for Liverpool, is quoted by the: New York City News association as
•having made the following statement concerning the- withdrawal of Ameri
can troops from Vera Cruz:
"It is a desperate shame that the United States has seen nt to abandon
the decent people of Mexico when they need help. I don'i know the. reasQn
tor this, but it would, seem that President Wilson hastJ}',4ji .ijiislBforme'd ill
.so,mo..matters, and that. If another dideof„tJie ^tiiatiMoS^-io'en. brought to
Tils attention he has not seen fit to listen to anythihg^hOTMJonttadicts those
who have bid him that the country has beeti pacified.
No Means of Protection.
"The people who did not get protection in Mexico City and elsewhere
went to Vera Cruz for protection. What will they do now? Thev have no
means of getting away and will be left to the mercies of the lawless ele
ment that will immediately overrun the town and country.
"When it is said that a state of absolute anarchy exists in Mexico, it is
liot stating the facts too- strongly. There were some 4,000 good policemen
/?aa Mexico, but thesis have been supplanted by an army- of 35,
000 soldiers that foujorht the federal government, and amon# these re sev
eral thousands of wild Yaqui Indians who two months ago fought with
bows and arrows as the only weapons they knew.
Lives In Ianger.
"Neither life, liberty nor property is safe, and whenever an officer so
desires he may turn a. family out of its home and commandeer everything.
There is no redress, for there are no courts, no congress, no laws—nothing
but anarchy and njilitary despotism, with not even a supreme chief to
oversee them.
"•Huerta had some sort of a government Carranza has none whatever
the only claim he has to jerreatness is his physique, and that is not so terri
fying, either. There is not even martial law there because there is no or
ganization."
GERMANS STRENGTHEN TO MEET FOES
London. Sept. 17.—Telegraphing
HERE'S WHAT GERMAN AERIAL BOMB THROWERS DID TO PARIS
from
correspondent of the Router Telegram company says that dispatches
deceived in Mftesterlcht, from Cologne, Duseeldorf, Wcsel, Duisburg, In
dicate that these points are strengthening their fortifications to meet
the possible advance of the allies.
AVERAGE DAILY GERMAN LOSSES 3,200
Berlin, Sept. 17.—The total of published German casualties to
date is 25,786 killed, wounded and missing. Since Inst week the av
erage daily losses shown in the casualty list* to he more than 3,200.
Among the killed September 14, was Prince Otto Victor of Schoen
burg Waldenburg of Hussar guards, a brother of the Princess of Wied
Major General Nieland killed leading a brigade in street fighting In a
French town.. Count Kirbach, commander Tenth reserve corps, died
of wounds September 3.
I Sr, S W
Many Events Seem to Have Conspired to Bring About Higher Prices,Kand the
the Careful Housewife !VI^ ,be ^ide„ Awake to Make Ends Meet. She Must Read
Maestcriiht, Holland, the
"U &
GRAND FORKS, N. D.4 THURSD$Y EVENING, SEPTEMBER 17, 1914. TEN PAGES—PRICE FIVE CENTS.
The fight proceeded with renewed
fury yesterday all along the
110-mile
battle front, in which nearly all of
the two million men of the rival
armies, together with about
500,000
reinforcements to the allies, are en
gaged.
The' Germans are fighting strictly
on the defensive, battling feerociously
to prevent the utter rout of the armies
whose re-alignment the covering
movement was designed to protect.
Though no definite results have
come out of the three days' fighting,
the enemy" is" being forced back stead
ily before the allied pressure, but is
fighting with dogged resistance every
mile of the way. The advance of the
allies is described by the war office as
steady but not rapid.
For the allies, the situation con
tinues favorable generally. The Ger
mans have delivered .several counter
attacks, and occupied several new po
sitions, from which they have made
occasional rallies, but always have
been repulsed.
The British first corps, under Lieu
tenant General Sir Douglas Haig, the
hero of M&ubeuge and Guise, forms
the center of the allied line of attack
north of the Aisne, and the brunt of
the fighting has been forced on its
front, 'While the French, supportng it
on t.he left and right, have been en
gaged only Intermittently thus far.
The German losses have been heavy.
The British center captured 200 pris
oner during the day., Many detached
bodies of the invaders have been aban
doned to be taken as prisoners by the
allies, and numerous groups of strag
glers hiding in forests have been taken
into camp, as prisoners, a condition
they, welcomed owing to their exhaust
ed'and'
hungry state.
The Idcgq of France.
Along this whole frone the fighting
has been forced upon the Germans,
/principally because of the resistance
offered by the fortress of Troyon, 12
(Continued on Page 5.)
teSt
HMD THAT KAISER Willi LOOKS UPON EASTERN
THEATER AS DECISIVE POINT GREAT EUROPEAN WAX
Abandonment of Liege Confirmed, Though Experts De
clare Such Movement Wouldn't Be Surprising
Situation of Crown Prince's Army Still Bad
PARIS, SEPT. 17.—THE GERMANS ARE SLOWLY GIVING
WAY IN THE GREAT BATTLE THAT CONTINUES TODAY ALL
ALONG THE LINE OF THE RIVER AISNE, ACCORDING TO THE
OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT IN PARIS THIS AFTERNOON.
ATTEMPT REPETITION OF TURNING MOVEMENT.
London, Sept. 17.—The British and French armies seem to be attempting to
repeat on the Aisne the turning movement carried out successfully in Marne, and
in the present case they have the additional incentive of knowing that should the
German right be again turned, there is no great defensive positions behind the in-
vaders until they reach the river Meuse.
The position of the army of the German crown prince, making its way to
ward Stenaygap, remains full of interest. The French army, which barred the exit
of the crown prince by Toul, still is hurrying in pursuit of him. No confirmation was
reported of the German abandonment of Liege, but it would not be surprising in
the opinion of the observers here to see the Germans quite Belgium altogether, if
there is any truth in the report that the eastern a £em of war has became the decisive
position in the German eyes. -•:-.
London, Sept. 17.—The world once more has been set to the task of guessing
how terrific a clash of arms on the heights northward of the river Aisne is pro
gressing. Berlin claims that attacks of the allies have been repulsed, and that Ger
man counter attacks have succeeded, while it is asserted officially in London that the
German counter attacks have been repulsed, and that the invaders are slowly giv
ing way. Sympathizers with both sides thus are met with directly conflicting state
ments, which can be reconciled only on the assumption that the narrators are re
ferring to different points in the vast field of action.
As the crow flies, the front of the opposing armies, which with heavy rein
forcements that have reached them probably total in the neighborhood of 3,000,000
men, stretches for 110 miles. Making allowances for the deviation north of Laon,
the line must be quite 150 miles long, so there is ample room for successes on one
part of the field, and reverses elsewhere, The Germans are in their selected posi
tions, with strong reinforcements rushed up from Lorraine, consequently this great
battle may yet prove to be one of the most decisive and momenteous of the war.
ITALIAN RESERVISTS HAVE BEEN CALLED OUT.
London, Sept. 17.—In a dispatch from Paris, the correspondent of the Daily
Telegraph says that the Italian reservists in the French capital have been called for
September 28. They believe, the correspondent says, that this means Italy's en
trance into the war.
Paris, Sept. 17.—The rearguard en
gagement upon which the German re
treating wing entered' on Monday,
Sept. 14, has developed into what
promises to be the decisive battle of
'the campaign in France.
.. -r:
is&
EVENING
SEDITION
Washington, Sept. 17—The German embassy received the follow*
Ing from Berlin:
"All the French-English reports of victories in battles In France
are untrue. The German retreat of the eastern wing was a practical
manoeuvre not affecting the strategical position. The French attempt
to break through the center or uie German position was victoriously
repulsed.
"There is confirmation of German successes at several points at
the long extended battlefield. The Temps reports that the losses of the
British army in the rccent fighting amount to 15,000 dead —fl
wounded.
Ijondon, Sept. 17.—Along the 90-mile front, the German, arnriea
are at bay, the allies occupying the ledge across the river Aisne,
was won after one of tle most spectacular and thrilling river
ever nuute by an attacking force under fire. For the past two
there have been spordic attacks from both sides along this line, but, ac
cording to admissions from rival headquarters, they have not produced
any definite results. Both sides suffered enormously during the past
week, and the present pause undoubtedly being used to bring up rein
forcements and srtppUes.
Washington, Sept. 17.—Tile French embassy here announced the te.
ceipt of the following dispatch from Bordeaux:
"On September 14 and 15 the rear of the enemy has been In touch
with the pursuing forces of our army. The rear of the enemy has
been reinforced by German troops. The enemy was forced to accept
battle along the whole front, part of which was strongly organized.
"The allies are on the northOf Vlc-Sur-Nalsne, Solssons and Laon.
and also the high hills on the north of France. Hie line reaches on
the north to Vllle-Snr-Tourve, a town on the west of the Argonne
mountains, and continues over the Argonne by a line to the
north of Varennes. This last plaee has been evacuated by the enemy.
who has reached the river Meuse, close to the forests of Ftorcn on tlM
north of Verdun."
"VS
SAY RUSSIANS STIUj PURSUE AUSTRIAN'S. |. y5.
New Tork. Sept. 17.—Colonel Golejwski, military attache of it ft#'
Russian embassy, issued at the Russian consulate the following mes-*"l
sage from Petrograd:
"The fighting against the Austrian rear guards continues all along
the line. Reports about prisoners, guns and war stores Mro tkkeii.*
are coming in from all our armies.
"On the left, bank of the river Sari, we attacked sucoessfnliy UwE- W
retreating Austrians. In eastern Prussia, in spite of all the
the Germans to surround a part of our retiring foroe, their
succeed."
CHANGES IN GERMAN COMMANDS MADE?""~1
Berlin, Sept. 17.—The official report issued at the army hrartiiiMI
tera says the French front remains unchanged. The French alttESs
upon a number of points Tuesday night, Wednesday mmi WednMa*
night, yrere successfully repulsed by the Germans, who
her of victorious encounter attack)!.
Owing to illness. General Von Hansen, commander of the Moontt"^
army. was replaced by General Von Elnem. fanner minister of w*r
Generat ion Schubert was replaced by General Von Stete In tfc*
teenth reserve corps.
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